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OF THE

NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY

ASTOR LENOX AND TILDEN FOUNDATIONS

Vol. IX. MARCH, 1905. No. 3.

REPORT FOR FEBRUARY.

REFERENCE DEPARTMENT.

During the month of February there were received at the Library, by purchase, 541 volumes and 615 pamphlets; by gift, 985 volumes and 2,823 pamphlets; and by exchange, 9o volumes and 5,861 pamphlets, making a total of 1,616 volumes and 9,299 pamphlets.

There were catalogued 2,617 volumes and 3,053 pamphlets, for which were written 7,937 cards, in addition to which 3,362 slips were written for, and 14,695 cards received from, the copying machine.

The following table shows the number of readers, and the number of volumes consulted, in both the Astor and Lenox Branches of the Library, also the number of visitors to the Print Exhibition at the Lenox, during the month:

LENox. ASTOR ToTAL No. of readers and visitors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5, 35o 14,308 19,658 No. of readers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - 2, 137 14,398 16,445 No. of readers, desk applicants. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,238 14,669 I 5,907 No. of volumes consulted by desk applicants. . 7,o to 53,872 6o,882 Daily average of readers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 596 685 Number of visitors to Print Exhibition, etc.. 3,677

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT.

The most popular books of the month were (in non-fiction): Hearn's “Japan,

an Attempt at an Interpretation,” Guerber's “Stories of the Opera,” and Palmer's

“with Kuroki in Manchuria”; (adult fiction): Thurston's “The Masquerader,"

Kelly’s “Little Citizens,” and Stevenson's “Marathon Mystery ”; (juvenile

fiction): “Alcott's “Little Women,” Tomlinson's “Winning His ‘W',” and Douglas's “Little Girl in Old New York.”

CIRCULATION STATISTICS FOR FEBRUARY.

circulation. | *...** | -- | __New — `" | volumes branches. registra- acces- o: *: o tions. adults. total. sioned. MANHATTAN. East Broadway, 33,............ . . . . 20,759 I, I99 427 2,109 2,796 123 Chatham Square. EAST BROADwAY, 197, ... . . . . . . . . . . 21,315 4,299 987 69 EDUCATIonal Alliance Building. ELDRIDGE Street, 184............. 7,314 1,471 264 1,488 4,253 99 t Bond STREET, 49............... - - - 9,990 690 28o 2,854 4, I42 44 8th St., 135 Second Ave.,............ 16,236 922 || 306 3,670 5,519 73 OTT ENDoRFER. Ioth St., 331 East,........... . ..... 20,857 3,033 636 1,642 2,429 357 Tompkins Square. 13th St., 251 West,...... ........ ... 11,296 1,823 259 1,908 || 1,977 III Jackson Square. 22d St., 230 East, ........... - - - - - - - 2,624 55 6o Epiphany. 23d St., 130 West,.................. 9,615 || 3,490 203 66 Muhlenberg. 34TH STREET, 215 East............. 6,711 2,499 II2 - 42 40th St., 5ol West,................ - 4,215 IIo St. RAphael. 42d St., 226 West,.............. - - - 12,810 2,200 300 58 George Bruce. 50th St., 123 East, ............ - - - - - 4,728 37o I53 181 37o I6 CATHEDRal. 51st St., 463 West, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,471 4IO 122 234 672 6 Sacred HEART. 59TH STREET, 113 East. ............ 12,286 1,327 216 3,783 3,812 2O6 67th STREET, 328 East............. 11,625 2,168 863 491 2,551 1, I:25 69th St., 190 Amsterdam Ave., ..... - 7,300 I,273 4IO I,563 2,964 219 Riverside. TRAVELLING LIBRARIEs............ 36, 125 513 76th St., 538 East, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7,834 1,239 I44 II 2 436 85 Webster. 79th St., 222-224 East,.............. 21,419 || 2, 126 353 2,748 5,884 4I Yorkville. 82d St., 2279 Broadway, ............ IO,050 2,756 138 6o St. AcNEs. o 86th St., 536 AMsterdaM Ave...... ... Io,369 708 I81 I,451 2,046 91st St., 121 West, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61o 3 5 Blind. | Iooth St., 206 West, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14,208 2,006 I90 1,287 2,421 66 Bloomingdale. IIoth St., 174 East, ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . | 16,875 2,091 475 I, O34 I,034 22 Aguilar. 123d St., 32 West,... . . . . . . . . . . - - - - . 11,867 559 275 I,752 2, I32 56 Harlem Library. | 125TH STREET, 224 East. . . . . . . . ...! 12,612 2,323 263 I,4IO 1,682 31 156th St., 922 St. Nicholas Ave.,.....|| 7,679 1,813 II6 38 Washington Heights. RICHMOND. Tottenville, 137 Johnson Ave. ... 2, 142 422 46 I55 Totals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 336,942 43,272 | 7,892 29,717 47, I2O 3,686

From Hon. John Bigelow were received two volumes of “The Ladies Magazine; An Entertaining Companion for the Fair Sex appropriated solely to their Use and Amusement,” for 1793 and 1794, containing the first publication in English of Franklin's autobiography, being the only time it was ever published as a serial. The translation was from the French version, in which the work shortly before had been given to the public two years after Franklin's death (1790). Other gifts were: From Henryk Arctowski, 28 of his pamphlets relating to Antarctic exploration; from the K. u. K. Reichs-Kriegs Ministerium, 9 of its publications; from the Brazilian Consul General at New York, 17 volumes and 1 Atlas relating to the boundary question between Brazil and British Guiana; from Cleveland H. Dodge, 165 volumes and 8 pamphlets, including 60 copies of the “Physiological Aspects of the Liquor Problem "; from Mrs. Henry Draper, 4 volumes, 5 pamphlets, and 72 prints, including a collection of Little Russian folk songs; from the Edinburgh Bibliographical Society a List of books printed in Scotland before 17oo; from Mrs. Paul L. Ford, 277 volumes and 31 pamphlets, including various editions of Weems’ “Life of Washington" and early American novels; from the Librarian of the Haus der Abgeordneten of Prussia, the “Bücher-Verzeichnis des Hauses der Abgeordneten,” 1900–1902, in 3 volumes; from Rev. Joseph H. McMahon, a German manuscript, probably written in the 16th century, containing a collection of medical receipts; from Dr. William James Morton, 2 photographs representing Dr. T. G. Morton's tuition tickets at Harvard Medical School, 1845, and a Diploma of Washington University granting Dr. Morton the Honorary Degree of M.D.; from the National Council of the Congregational Churches of the United States, the “Congregational Year-books” for 1893, 1901, 1902 and 1904; from the Polish Socialist Society of London, 1.4 volumes and 79 pamphlets of their publications; from Victor H. Paltsits, a copy of his “Bibliography of the Writings of Baron La Hontan”; from John Robinson, 5 annuals, including “The Jewel" for 1839, 1843, and 1846; from Elihu Root, his Argument before the Attorney General on the Canal Improvement Act; from the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Association, 18 volumes, being the writings of Thomas Jefferson, Monticello edition; from the Vermont State Library, 13 volumes and 18 pamphlets, state docnments; from Paul Weir, 3 volumes of the “Royal Gazette” of Bermuda; and from the Deutsche Gesellschaft von Pennsylvanien, 33 of their “Jahresberichte," 3 mounted photographs representing the laying of the cornerstone of their new building, 1888, and 8 pamphlets relating to the Germans in Philadelphia. One of the important purchases of the month was a volume of “Laws Of Her Majesties Colony of New-York,” printed in this city by William Bradford in 1710. With this volume in the Library our file of the New York digests is complete so far as the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries are concerned; 1694, 17 Io, 1713, 1726, 1752, 1762, 1774, 1784, 1789, 1792–1797 (first to the third, fifth to the eleventh), all are New York imprints, 1719 (fourth in the series) is the London reprint. At the LENox Branch the exhibitions of etchings by Félix Bracquemond, Robert F. Blum, and R. Swain Gifford were continued during the month, as was also that of the Smith collection of Japanese prints and the Century Company's printing exhibit. To the Gifford Exhibition there were added on February 15 three graphite drawings, by I. Ferris Lockwood, after paintings by Gifford. At the Astor Branch the plates illustrating anniversaries and holidays occurring in January to March were continued. At the ToMPKINS SQUARE Branch the Print Room exhibition of plates from Audsley's “Ornamental Arts of Japan" was continued, as were the exhibitions of Racinet's costume plates at the 125th STREET Branch and the Hollyer etchings at the 67th Street Branch. At CHATHAM SQUARE the plates from the Wilkie Gallery remained on view, and at Yorkville Racinet's costume plates, Part 2 (after the XVIth Century). At the Circulation branches the picture bulletins and temporary collections of books on special shelves were as follows: At all of the branches, Abraham Lincoln and George Washington. In addition to these there were at CHATHAM SQUARE, Charles Dickens, Lew Wallace; EAST BRoadway, Famous men and women born in February, Bond STREET, Making of an empire, Anthracite coal, California, Patriotic songs, Texas, New books; OTT ENDoRFER, Sociology, African geography; ToMPKINS SQUARE, Famous men and women born in February, Germany; JACKSON SQUARE, New books, France; MUHLENBERG, Cow boy life, Songs of Burns, Wonders of Colorado, The violin, California, Brittany and Normandy, Touraine, Switzerland; Fifty-NINTH STREET, Longfellow, Famons men and women born in February; Riverside, New books; Seventy-sixth STREET, Music, Questions of the day, St. Valentine's day; Yorkville, New books; St. AGNEs, France, Eastern geography; Blooming DALE, Lew Wallace, Wild animals; AGUILAR, Famous men and women born in February; ONE HUNDRED AND Twenty-Fifth STREET, Lew Wallace; Tottenville, Our country, a story, South America, The making of a newspaper. The new building for the Riverside Branch at 190 Amsterdam Avenue, between 68th and 69th Streets, was opened with formal exercises on Thursday, February 16th, at 4.30 P.M. Hon. Alfred J. Tailey, Civil Service Commissioner, the designated representative of the Mayor, presided and accepted the building on behalf of the City from Hon. John L. Cadwalader, who turned it over on behalf of the Trustees of the New York Public Library. Addresses were also made by Frank Dodd, Esq., President of the Riverside Association, and by Dr. J. S. Billings, Director of the Library. Music was furnished by the Glee Club and Orchestra of the High School of Commerce. This branch building is the seventh erected by the Public Library from the Carnegie fund. The branch library that occupies it was first opened in connection with the Riverside Association in its building at 259 West 69th Street on February 3, 1894. It was turned over to the New York Free Circulating Library on May 6, 1897, and received as a branch of the Public Library on February 23, 1901. After several removals it finds a permanent home in the new building just dedicated.

COLLATION OF THE WARIOUS ISSUES OF. THE AMERICAN DIPLOMATIC CORRESPONDENCE (1776–1783, 1783–1789) IN THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY.

By A. R. HAsse, Chief of the Document Department.

Because of frequent inquiries for information about the two series of printed diplomatic correspondence known as the Diplomatic Correspondence of the American Revolution (1776–1783) and Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States (1783–1789), and because of frequent confusion of the two series, or of their various issues, as noted in catalogues, the following statement is made of the set owned by the New York Public Library. The set is believed to be complete.

Of the first series, which covers the period 1776–1783, two editions were issued, namely:

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Of the second series, which covers the period 1783–1789, three editions were issued, namely:

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The Diplomatic Correspondence | of the American Revolution. || Being the letters of Benjamin Franklin, Silas Deane, John Adams, John Jay, Arthur Lee, William Lee, Ralph Izard, Francis Dana, William Carmichael, Henry Laurens, John Laurens, M. Dumas, and others, concerning the foreign relations of the United States | during the whole revolution; together with | the letters in reply from the Secret Committee of | Congress, and the Secretary of Foreign Affairs. || Also, the entire correspondence of the French ministers, Gerard and Luzerne, with Congress. | Published under the Direction of the President of the United States, from the original Manuscripts in the Department of State, conformably to a Resolution of Congress, of March 27th, 1818. Edited | by Jared Sparks. | Boston : M. Hale and Gray & Bowen. G. & C. & H. Carvill, New York, 1829–30. 12 v.

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4. 1829. xxvi, 507 pp.

Correspondence of Franklin, continued, Aug. 23, 1782– Nov. 29, 1788, p. 1-231. Correspondence of John Adams, one of the commissioners to France, minister plenipotentiary to Holland, and one of the commissioners for negotiating a treaty of peace, Dec. 3, 1777–Apr. 16, 1780, p. 233507.

5. I829. xx, 504 pp. Correspondence of John Adams, continued, Apr. 17, 1780– May 16, 1781, p. 1-504.

6, 1830. xxiii, 512 pp. Same, continued, May 16, 1781–Dec. 4, 1782, p. 1–512. 7. 1830. xxiv, 512 pp. Same, continued, Dec. 14, 1782-Sept. ro, †. p. 1-167. Correspondence of John Jay, Dec. 20, 1779-Nov. 28, 1781, p. 169-512.

1830. xxiv, 510 pp.

Correspondence of John Jay, continued, Dec. 13, 1781-Jly' 25, 1784, p. 1-237. Francis Dana's correspondence, Aug’ 1o, 1780-Dec. 17, 1783, p. 239-51o.

9. 1830. xxvii, 531 pp.

Correspondence of William Carmichael, chargé d'affaires from U.S. to court of Spain, Nov. 2, 1776-Aug. 30, 1783, p. 1-192. Correspondence of John Laurens, special minister to the court of France, Dec. 23, 1780–Sept. 6, 1781, p. 193249. Correspondence of Charles W. F. Dumas, agent of the U.S. in Holland, Dec. 19, 1775-Je. 23, 1783, p. 251-531.

Io. 1830. xxviii, 500 pp.

Correspondence of Gen. La Fayette on the foreign affairs of the U.S.; Nov. 23, 1781–Oct. 15, 1787, p. 1-66. Correspondence of the American commissioners [John Adams, ranklin, Jay, Henry Laurens, and Jefferson] for negotiating a peace with Great Britain, Je. 15, 1781—Sept. 10, 1783, p. 67–230. ‘.... of C.A. Gerard, minister plenipotentiary from the court of France to the U.S., Mch. 28, 1778–Sept. 25, 1779, p. 231-356. Correspondence of C. A. de la Luzerne, minister plenipotentiary from France to the U.S., Sept. 16, 1779-Sept. 6, 1781, p. 357-500.

II. 1830. xxxii, 503 pp.

Correspondence of Luzerne, continued, Sept. 10, 1781–? 1787, p. 1-193. Correspondence of Robert Livingston, secretary of foreign affairs, Jan. 10, 1781-Je. 2, 1783, p. 195—342. Correspondence of obert Morris, superintendent of finance, Feb. 7, 1781—Nov. 2, 1781, p. 343-503.

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