Lessons in Elocution: Or, A Selection of Pieces in Prose and Verse, for the Improvement of Youth in Reading and Speaking

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Hori Brown, 1817 - 407 oldal
 

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Tartalomjegyzék

Sincerity
92
Benevolence and humanity
93
Industry and application
94
Proper employment of time
95
The true patriot Art of Thinking
96
On contentment Spectator
97
Needlework recommended to the ladies
100
On pride Guardian
102
Journal of the life of Alexander Severus Gibbon
104
Character of Julius Cesar Middleton
105
On misspent time Guardian
106
Character of Francis I
110
The søpper and grace Sterne
113
Pustic felicity
115
House of mourning ib 12 100 102 104 105 106 110 113 115
116
SECTION III
119
Character of Addison as a writer Johnson
120
Pleasure and Pain Spectator
121
Sir Roger de Coverlys family
123
The folly of inconsistent expectations Aitkin 7 Description of the vale of Keswick in Cumberland Broun
128
Pity an allegory Adkin
131
Advantages of commerce Spectator
134
On public speaking
135
Advantages of history Hume
136
On the immortality of the soul Spectator
139
The combat of the Horatii and the Curiatii Livy
141
On the power of custom Spectator
144
On pedantry Mirror 16 The journey of a day a picture of human Kfe Rambler 128 131 133 135 136 139 141 144
146
Description of the ampitheatre of Titus Gibbong
153
Reflections in Westminster abbey Spectator 153
154
Importance of virtue
164
The Monk
170
Uncle Tobys benevolence
178
Story of the siege of Calais Fool of Quality
184
Liberty and slavery
208
SECTION VI
221
Diversity in the human character
227
Extract from the temple of fame
233
The camelion Merrick
240
On the order of nature Pupe
241
Description of a country alehouse Goldsmith
242
The PassionsAn ode Collins
256
SECTION VIII
259
LAllegro or the merry man ib
260
On the pursuits of mankind Pope
262
Adam and Eves morning hymn Milton 264
268
The creation of the world Milton
273
Overthrow of the rebel angels ib
274
Alexanders feast or the power of music Dryden
275
PART 1 LESSONS IN SPEAKING SECTION I
278
On doing as we would be done unto Atterbury
280
On benevolence and charity Seed
282
On happiness Sterne
285
On the death of Christ Blair
289
ELOQUENCE OF THE SENATE Page 293 1 Speech of the Earl of Chesterfield
293
Lord Mansfield
298
SECTION III
303
Pleadings of Cicero against Verres 2 Cicero for Milo 303
306
Romulus to the people of Rome after building the city Hooke 2 Hannibal to Scipio Africanus
314
Scipios reply
315
Calisthenes reproof of Cleons flattery to Alexander Q Curtius
316
Caius Marius to the Romans Hooke
317
Publius Scipio to the Roman army
320
Hannibal to the Carthaginian army
323
Junius Brutus over the dead body of Lucretia
331
Demosthenes to the Athenians Lansdown
333
Jupiter to the inferior deities Homer
338
Æneas to queen Dido Virgil
339
Moloch to the infernal powers
341
Speech of Belial advising peace ib 318 317 320 323 325 329 331 333 338 339 341
342
Milton SECTION V
344
Lady Townly and Lady Grace Provoked Husband
346
Priuli and Jaffier Venice Preserved
351
Boniface and Aimwell Beaux Stratagem
353
Lovegold and Lappet Miser
355
Cardinal Wolsey and Cromwell Henry VIII
359
SPEECHES AND SOLILOQUIES
369
Henry IVs soliloquy on sleep 2 Henry IV
375
Speech of Henry V at the siege
381
Falstaffs soliloquy on honor Henry IV
388
Gay
402

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221. oldal - Whilst all the stars that round her burn, And all the planets in their turn, Confirm the tidings as they roll, And spread the truth from pole to pole.
371. oldal - She'd come again, and with a greedy ear Devour up my discourse. Which I observing, Took once a pliant hour; and found good means To draw from her a prayer of earnest heart, That I would all my pilgrimage dilate...
245. oldal - Twilight gray had in her sober livery all things clad : Silence accompanied ; for Beast and Bird, they to their grassy couch, these to their nests, were slunk, — all but the wakeful nightingale; she, all night long, her amorous descant sung; Silence was pleased. Now...
363. oldal - All this? ay, more: Fret till your proud heart break; Go, show your slaves how choleric you are, And make your bondmen tremble.
239. oldal - Yet he was kind, or if severe in aught, The love he bore to learning was in fault...
222. oldal - The sober herd that low'd to meet their young ; The noisy geese that gabbled o'er the pool, The playful children just let loose from school ; The watch-dog's voice, that bay'd the whispering wind, And the loud laugh that spoke the vacant mind ; These all in sweet confusion sought the shade, And fill'd each pause the nightingale had made.
238. oldal - Lives through all life, extends through all extent, Spreads undivided, operates unspent: Breathes in our soul, informs our mortal part, As full, as perfect, in a hair as heart; As full, as perfect, in vile man that mourns, As the rapt seraph that adores and burns: To him no high, no low, no great, no small; He fills, he bounds, connects, and equals all.
356. oldal - Why, well : Never so truly happy, my good Cromwell. I know myself now ; and I feel within me A peace above all earthly dignities, A still and quiet conscience.
255. oldal - Orphean lyre, I sung of Chaos and eternal Night ; Taught by the heavenly muse to venture down The dark descent, and up to reascend, Though hard and rare : thee I revisit safe, And feel thy sovereign vital lamp ; but thou Revisitest not these eyes, that roll in vain To find thy piercing ray, and find no dawn ; So thick a drop serene hath quenched their orbs, Or dim suffusion veiled.
364. oldal - There is no terror, Cassius, in your threats, For I am arm'd so strong in honesty That they pass by me as the idle wind, Which I respect not.

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