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LONDON:
HENRY G. BOHN, YORK STREET, COVENT GARDEN.

1854.

192

Lelp

710383

LONDON:

MARY S. RICKERBY, PRINTER, 73, CANNON STREET,

CITY.

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AN ESSAY CONCERNING HUMAN UNDERSTANDING.
Introduction by the Editor

112
Epistle Dedicatory to the Earl of Pembroke

114
Epistle to the Reader......

116

BOOK I.

CHAP. 1.- Introduction

2.-No Innate Principles in the Mind
3.—No Innate Practical Principles......
4.-Other Considerations concerning Innate Principles,

both speculative and practical

128
134
154

179

BOOK II.

CHAP. 1.--Of Ideas in general and their original

2.—Of Simple Ideas
3.-Of Ideas of one Sense
4.-Of Solidity
5.-Of Simple Ideas of divers Senses
6.—Of Simple Ideas of Reflection
7.–Of Simple Ideas of both Sensation and Reflection
8.-Some further Considerations concerning our Simple

Ideas......

205
224
226
228
233
234
234

240

Page
CHAP. 9.Of Perception

253
10.--Of Retention

262
11.--Of Discerning, and other Operations of the Mind 270
12.–Of Complex Ideas

279
13.-Of Simple Modes; and, first, of the Simple Modes
of Space

282
14.–Of Duration and its Simple Modes

300
15.–Of Duration and Expansion, considered together 317
16.-Of Number

325
17.-Of Infinity

330
18.–Of other Simple Modes

345
19.–Of the Modes of Thinking

347
20.-Of Modes of Pleasure and Pain

351
21.-Of Power

359
22.-Of Mixed Modes........

415
23.—Of our Complex Ideas of Substances

422
24.–Of Collective Ideas of Substances..

447
25.--Of Relation ......

449
26.-_Of Cause and Effect, and other Relations

454
27.-Of Identity and Diversity

458
28.-Of other Relations

482
29.–Of clear and obscure, distinct and confused Ideas ... 498
30.-Of real and fantastical Ideas ..

508
31.–Of adequate and inadequate Ideas

510
32.—Of true and false Ideas

520
33. Of the Association of Ideas

531

..........

PRELIMINARY DISCOURSE.

"Εοτι δε τό γε αληθειά τις ταύτα τα γράμματα των Παρμενίδου λόγω προς τους επιχειρούντας αυτόν κωμωδεϊν. .

PLAT. PARMENIDES.

An edition of the Philosophical Works of Locke has long been wanting. It is in fact matter of surprise, that a body of writings, in which the most popular metaphysical system of modern times is developed, should never before have been presented to the world in a collected form, and detached from all miscellaneous compositions. The object of the present discourse is to describe briefly and with simplicity, the character of these various pieces, in order that the reader who happens not to be already acquainted with them, may proceed with the greater curiosity to their perusal.

The Essay on the Human Understanding, the principal of Locke's writings, has now been before the world for nearly two centuries. It has excited the strongest opposition; it has been assailed by calumny, it has often been misunderstood, and sometimes neglected. Nevertheless, such is its character, such are the principles it contains, such the clearness, fulness, and satisfactory nature of its interpretations of intellectual phenomena, that it can never be wholly laid aside so long as the study of philosophy shall retain any charm for mankind.

That it is not a popular work must be admitted; nor can it, perhaps, by any art or contrivance be rendered so. For, in the first place, the public possess but little inclination to penetrate backwards, as it were, to the dim and misty fountains of human knowledge, lying remote from observation, and thickly shaded by the foliage of doubts and uncertainties; and secondly, to be frank and candid, the guide himself who undertakes to conduct us

VOL. I.

B

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