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CLASS IV.

PHILOSOPHY.

CHAP. I.

LOGIC, OR THE RIGHT USE OF REASON. ADVANTAGES to be derived from its cultivation.' It consists of four parts. 1. SIMPLE APPREHENSION. Sensation and Reflection. Ideas, Words, and 'Definitions. II. JUDGMENT, of which the foundations are three-- Intuition, or the ground of scientific knowledge-Experience, or the ground of natural knowledge—Testimony, or the ground of historical knowledge. III. REASONING-its different kinds-Epichrerna, Dilemma Sorites. The modes and figures of Syllogisms no helps to the discovery of truth. IV. METHOD analytic and fynthetic. A found understanding, Practice, and the Imitation of good examples necessary to form a good Reasoner.

P. 53-82,

CHAP. II.

THE MATHEMATICS. I. The Utilility of Mathematical Knowledge. Opinion of Locke favourable to fcientific pursuits-their great perspi. cuity--the method of reasoning pursued in them. Mathematics are pure or mixed. I. Pure: Arithinetic-AlgebraGeometry—Trigonometry. --Mixed: MechanicsPneumatics Hydrostatics-Optics--Altronomy,

P. 82-126.

CHAP. III.

THE SUCJECT CONTINUED. Men of Science have been remarkable for the purity of their morals. Notices of those whose discoveries and researches form memorable èras in the hiftory of Science.--PYTHAGORAS - ARCHIMEDES — FRIAR BACON COPERNICUSGALILEO-KEPLER -CASSIN!--LORD BACON-Box LE. The most able interpreter of the Laws of Nature was NewTON-Sketch of his discoveries-HERSCHEL. The proper fubordination of Science to polite Literature in a general Syflem of Education. Union of both in the eminent Students of the University of Canubridge.

P. 127-154. 2,2

CHAP. CHAP. IV. THE WORKS or NATURE. THE survey of the Works of Nature is both instructive and bigbly pleasing. The researches of Naturalists are 'directed to, I. ANIMALS; II. VEGETABLES; III. MINERALS. The System of the Animal Kingdom according to LINNÆUS. The comparative nature of Man. The inftin&t of Animalsthe admirable care of Nature in their structure and preservation.—Her prolific power in the production of organized Bodies appear to be boundless. The Organs of Animals adapted to their convenience and preservation-illustrated by the formation of the Eye. Prospect of the dominion of Man over the inferior Animals.

· P. 155–185.

CHAP. V.

THE SUBJECT CONTINUED. - "The vegetable Kingdom. Botany. The Linnæan System. --The fexual System was established not discovered by LINNÆUS. The structure of Plants-Local usefulness of particular Vegetables-Proofs of the ardour with which the Study of Botany has inspired its followers. Pleasures of the Boa tanift.

P. 186-206.

| CHAP. VI.

THE SUBJECT CONTINUED. O The Principles of MINERALOG Y and CHEMISTRY in their prelent improved State. The works of Nature furnish our minds with convincing proofs of the power, wisdom, and goodness of their GREAT AUTHOR.

P. 207-243.

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POLITE LITERATURE AND THE FINE ARTS.

CHAP. I.

TASTE.

: DEFINITION of Taste-Its priuciples are implanted in every mind distinguished by good sense. Tatie is capable of

.. .high

high cnltivation—Its proper Limits and Standard. Individuals, as well as Nations, improve their Taste, in proportion to the progress of Knowledge and Refinement. All the beau. tiful appearances of Nature are objects of Taste instanced in Forms and Colours. Line of Beauty. Description of GENIUS. Men of Genius in various ages. Remarks on some of the moft eminent Critics,

P. 244–268.

CHAP. II.

THE SUBJECT CONTINUED. Observations on Music. PAINTING. Poetry. The beauties of the GREEK AND LATIN CLASSICS. The pleasures which result from the exercise of a cultivated Taste."

P. 269–297.

CLASS VI.

THE SOURCES OF OUR NATIONAL PROSPERITY, &C.

CHAP. I.

AGRICULTURE

HAS been esteemed an object of great importance both in ancient and modern times. Eminent Writers upon the subject -Hefiod-Xenophon, &c. It has flourished most in the foil of liberty--gradually improved as old errors have been ex. ploded, and new experiments have been tried and adopted. The best method of forming general principles upon this subject. Population is limited by the means of subsistence. The character and relative importance of the HUSBANDMAN, The general advantages of Agriculture-Its fuperiority to Commerce as a fource of national good, and permanent power,

P. 298_-318.

CHAP. II.

THE SUBJECT CONTINUED.

THE state of Agriculture in ENGLAND compared with that of ERANCE, IRELAND, and AMERICA. Causes of the superio ority of England. Plans of farther Improvement suggefied. All other Arts are inferior in point of utility to that of causing

the

the Earth to bring forth a copious produce for the support of Mankind.

P. 319-334.

CHAP. III.

COMMERCE. THE prospect of Industry displayed in every part of Great Britain excites our curiosity to inquire into, I. The Advantages, II. The Principles, III. The comparative State of Commerce. The natural, advantages of the Illand of Great Britain as a commercial Country have been gradually improved by great public works. The influence of Cominerce upon Agriculture, Character of the ENGLISH MERCHANT. The methods which have been adopted for the promotion of Commerce. A Comparifon between the present and former Stute of England proves the beneficial effects of Connierce-'ibe obft:cies oppofed to its farther improvement may be removed - Great Britain fuperior to most other Countries in the requisite means for a widely-extended Commerce.

P. 335–373.

CHAP. IV.

FOREIGN TRAVEL.

ITS chief Adtantages. The qualifications necessary for a Gentleman wlio vifits foreign Commtries. The Curiosities of his own IBand to be previously viewed. Bad effects of going abroad too young. Halle in palling through different Countries, and Ignorance of foreign Languages censured. Eminent modern Travellers-GRAY-HOWARD-SIR JOSEPH BANKS SIR WILLIAM HAMILTON, &c. &c. The Traveller gratities his taste by treading on classic ground.--He visits places celebrated in the writings, and diftinguished by the actions of the Ancients. He views the ancient and modern Specimens of the fine Arts ---Architecture-Sculpture--Medals-- Pictures--Books. He examines the State of Government--Religion-Commerce Agriculture, &c. and remarks their combined effects upon the Mimers, Cuttoms, and Prosperity of Nations.—Their benefical iz!luence of liis travels upon his Opinions and Conduct.

P. 374_405.

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CHAP. V.

THE PROFESSIONS.

CLASSICAL Learning and the Elements of Science and Philosophy are highly beneficial to those who do not follow a profession, as well as afford the only folid foundation for profersional knowledge. The attainments requisite for, I. The BARRISTER. II. THE PHYSICIAN. III. THE CLERGYMAN.

P. 406-414.

THE CONCLUDING CHAPTER.

Final Exhortations to the improvement of the faculties of the mind, and the acquirement of useful knowledge, arising chiefly from the circumitances of the PRESENT TIMES.

P. 445-473.

THE APPENDIX.

List and Characters of such USEFUL. Books, as illustrate more clearly, and explain more fully the preceding lubjects. To these are added Lifts of the bett Editions of GREEK and ROMAN CLASSICS, and of the most APPROSED Authors in all important branches of LITERATURE and SCIENCE.

P. 474.–-55%.

END OF THE GENERAL TABLE OF CONTINTS.

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