Oldalképek
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Full of a nature

Nothing can tame,
Changed every moment,

Ever the same;
Ceaseless aspiring,

Ceaseless content,
Darkness or sunshine

Thy element;
Glorious fountain,

Let my heart be
Fresh, changeful, constant.
Upward, like thee!

JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL.

10

blithesome (blith'sum): gay, happy

aspiring (a spir'ing): reaching up

ward

HELPS TO STUDY

Read this poem carefully to yourself; then read it aloud in a lively way, that shows that you feel the rush and dash of the water as it leaps and plays.

1. How does the fountain look in the sunlight ? 2. In the moonlight ? 3. In the fifth stanza, explain the last line. 4. In the sixth stanza, what is said about the nature of the fountain ? 5. What lesson does the poet wish to learn from the fountain ?

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Who comes dancing over the snow,

His soft little feet all bare and rosy? Open the door, though the wild winds blow,

Take the child in and make him cosy.

Take him in and hold him dear, He is the wonderful glad New Year.

DINAH M. CRAIK.

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5

“There's a merry brown thrush sitting up

in a tree, He's singing to me! He's singing to me!” And what does he say, little girl, little boy? “Oh, the world's running over with joy!

Don't you hear? Don't you see?
Hush! Look! In

In my tree
I'm as happy as happy can be !'”
And the brown thrush keeps singing: “A nest

do you see, And five eggs, hid by me in the juniper-tree? Don't meddle! don't touch! little girl, little boy, 10

Or the world will lose some of its joy.

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5

Now I'm glad! Now I'm free!

And I always shall be, If you never bring sorrow to me.” So the merry brown thrush sings away in the

tree, To you

and to me, to you and to me; And he sings all the day, little girl, little boy, 0, the world's running over with joy!

But long it won't be,

Don't you know? Don't you see?
Unless we are as good as can be!

10

LUCY LARCOM.

juniper (jū'ni per) : an evergreen tree

lose (looz): to be deprived of

HELPS TO STUDY

1. The first stanza of the poem seems to be a conversation. Who are talking? 2. What is the spirit of the thrush's song, gay or sad? 3. Of what does he sing ? 4. Read the poem freely and easily, and give the right feeling to it. Notice that if you read it quickly and freely, it is more like the song of the bird.

5. Stevenson has a poem called “Singing.” Do you know it?

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Don't you hear? Don't you see? Hush !

Look! In my tree, (2d verse) Now I'm glad ! Now I'm free! And I al - ways shall be, (3d verse) But. long it won't be, Don't you know? Don't you see?

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1. From what book is the story of “Tom and the Lobster” taken ? Who wrote it? Who was Tom? What funny habits and ideas had he?

2. What lines can you recite from “ The Sandpiper ” ? Describe the scene of the poem.

3. Of what things does the fountain make Lowell think? Find some lines in the poem that remind you of the motion of the fountain.

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