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Tell artes they have no soundness,

But vary by esteeminge ;
Tell kollers lack profoundness,

And stand too much on seeminge.
If artes and lkollers replye,
Give artes and skollers the lye.

Tell faith its fled the cittye ;

Tell how the country errethe ;
Tell manhood shakes of pytie;

Tell virtue least preferreth.
And if they do replye,
Spare not to give the lye.

So when thou haft, as I

Commanded thee, done blabbing ;
Althoughe to give the lye

Deserves no less than stabbings
Yet stab at thee who will,
No ftab the foul can kilt.

A PARODY ON THE FORE GOING

WRITTEN IN 1764. Go, truth, unwelcome guest!

Upon a thankless errant; Fear not to touch the best,

For truth is a safe warrant. Go, fince thou needs muft dic, And give them all the lye.

Gay

Go, tell the Tory faction,

Now in their noontide hour, England won't bear an action

Of an arbitrary power. If Tories should reply, Give Tories all the lye.

Go, tell th' ennobled thief,

While cares oppress him most,
He ne'er shall tafte relief

From guilt-from Ayliffe's ghoft.
And if the thief reply,
Then give the thief the lye.

Go, tell the Scottish Thane,

Rais'd high by r-last,
That luft shall prove his bane,

And lay him in the duft.
And should the Thane reply,
Then say proud Thane you lye.

1

Go, tell the immortal Pitt,

Author of England's glory, He shall recorded fit

Foremost in future story.

Cætera desunt.

EPIGRAM.

1

E P I G R A M.

SAY when will England be from faction freed?

When will domestic quarrels cease ? Ne'er till that wilh’d-for epitaph we read,

“ Here lies the man that made the peace.” E. G.

A SINGULAR ADVERTISEMENT VERSIFIED.

TO THE GENTLEMEN, CLERGY, AND FREEHOLDERS

OF THE COUNTY OF GLOUCESTER
A Courtier profess’d, much esteem'd by the great,
As a weather-cock fixt to a point, or as fate,
I send my best compliments round the whole fire :
A steady old boy, and a young voluntier :
Tho' as fate I am fix'd, and resolv'd to abide,
In turns, as it happens, by this or that fide ;

* To the Gentlemen, Clergy, and Freeholders of the county

of Gloucester.
GENTLEMEN,
THOUGH I am fixed as fate, to abide by the determination
of the general meeting of the 13th instant, permit me to de-
clare my wishes that Lord Coleraine may be the object of your
choice, as I know him to be a man of honour and principle,
and most ubnoxiousto the late convention of the 28th of March.

I have the honour to be,
Grosvenor-Atreet, Gentlemen,
April 4, 1763 Your obliged and devoted servant,

N. BERKLEY.

Permit me, good people, to now recommend
This very good lord, and my very good friend;
Pray let him have yours, as I give him my voice,
And make this choice object your object of choice.
I know him--that's all he will stick to his plan,
Like a harmless, obnoxious, pretty sort of a man.
My merits you know, and you'll thank me, I'm clear,
For thinking so much of your cyder this year :
In behalf of which tax I'd be proud to divide,
Tho' the whole house oppos'd, with my friend on

my fide.

Obnoxious I am, and obnoxious is he,
And obnoxious this lord-so obnoxious all three.
I rely on your favours-fo grant me this suit,
And depend on my service to tell my Lord Bute.

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Now tremble, coloniits! your time is come:
From matchless genius wait your

settled doom. C-nw-y no more shall weave your filken chains; Play with your bit, or trifle with your reins. Fame sends his son to curb your flaming state; 'Tis Botetourt, and he is fix'd as fate. L. V. * Sir Dde

ON

ON A CERTAIN LA W Y E R's

TAKING A PATENT OF PRECEDENCE IN 1764 *.
SEE! from his colours turncoat Yorke" retreat!
And humbly cast himself at Grenville's feet;
Warm from his heart, in copious mufic now,
Prerogative's melodious accents flow;
While tame servility, with longing eyes,
Courts, and would hope, a Henley's feal the prize t.
Why lives not Churchill's fpirit to rehearse
Such prostitution in immortal verse;
And, on the strong foundation of such shame,
Erect a monument to Norton's fame?
Tho' dead the muse, yet hift'ry still remains,
And truth, to blush at such unmanly strains.

ON MR. YORK E's

TAKING A PATENT OF PRECEDENCE IN 1764,
YORKE's great humility, I own,
At first

may

seem a stretcher; He takes a patent from the crown,

To fit below Sir Fletcher to

The late Hon. Charles Yorke. + Lord Henley, afterwards Earl of Northington, was at that time Lord Chancellor,

I Norton, afterwards Lord Grantley.

EPIGRAM

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