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WRITTEN UNDER TAL PICTURE OF DR. HAYTIR,

BISHOP OT NORWICH,

SOON AFTER

HE WAS DISMISSED FROM

HIS POST 01

GOVERNOR TO THE PRINCE OF WALLS IN 17520

Not gentler virtues glow'd in Cambray's breaft,
Not more his young Telemachus was bless'd ;
'Till envý, faction, and ambitious rage
Drove from a guilty court the pious sage.
Back to his flock with transport he withdrew,
And but one figh, an honest one he knew!
O guard my royal pupil, heav'n! he said;
Let not his youth be, like my age, betray'd !
I would have form'd his footsteps in thy way-
But“ vice prevails, and impious men bear sway.”

A N O DE

TO THE MOST UNPOPULAR MAN LIVING.

WRITTEN IN THE YEAR 1753.
SIR, while your heart with transport glows
To find your most important nose

Lost in your PC s ear ;
Perceive you not, with strange surprize,
How Fortune smiles on some folks lyes,

Tho' Truth herself appear?

While your wise counsels, and your cares
Affect a nation's vast affairs,

A kingdom, and a
Is all your breast calm and ferene,
As when you walk'd on * Winton's Green,

And dreamt of no such thing?
Envy, you'll say, your worth attends
Maliciously, like treach'rous friends,

Perfidious to their truft ; Nor may

ev'n Fortune's fav’rites find, That they alone, of all mankind,

Escape by being juft.

But say, since in a luckless hour
You roll in wealth, and rose to pow'r,

How relish you the scene ?
Is then ambition quite as blest
As she in Fancy's garb is drest ?

How feel you, Sir, within ?
Can you reflect, without remorse?
I fear you can so much the worfem

But, Sir, How are your dreams ?
Free are they all from guilt and fear?
See you not injur'd Norwich there,

Or Harcourt cross the Thames ?

* The family seats

Or

s him to print it; and we order that no other petfon do presume to print the same at their peril. “ Done as one of our greatest acts, this last moment of our administration.

GL.

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INTRODUCTION. THERE is not any thing so eagerly read by the publick, as those thining periods of history which are filled up with the important negotiations and fagacious conduct of some great politician. But the qualities which must conspire to form an author ca. pable of doing justice to fo grand a period, are so rarely to be met with, that it will perhaps be esteemed an unpardonable presumption in a common writer, to attempt so arduous a task. Yet invited by the grandeur of the subject, and spurred on by the love of glory, who can forbear to enter on fo great a design? The work will immortalize the workman. In hopes therefore of a glorious immortality, and inspired with the dignity of the subject, I sit down to write the ensuing history with all the candour, truth, and impartiality that becomes an historian, entering on the performance of fo elaborate and magnificent a work.

PART

PART THE FIRST.

ON the tenth day of February one thousand seven hundred and forty-five, his grace the duke of Newcastle, aud the right honourable the earl of Harrington resigned the seals into his My's hands. And

The King was pleased to appoint the right hon. John earl Granville to be principal secretary of state.

And now was to commence such a revolution in Our political conduct as was to astonish all Europe. The king of France, the queen of Spain, the pope, the devil, and the pretender, were all to be demolished in the twinkling of an eye. It was prophesied by the London Evening Poft, that several dark parsages in our modern annals were to be cleared up ; that certain trials, which had been for some time fuspended, were to go on without a screen ; and

many other great things were to be accomplished. In order thereto several changes were to be brought about ; one in particular is told by a tart historian of the present times in the following manner.

A certain wag, well known by the name of Will Waddel, played a comical unlucky trick the other day, with a companion of his who is lately come from Carlisle. Will told this youth, that he could procure him an admirable place in the family of a certain great man of his acquaintance; and accordingly took the youth, who had powdered and beB 6

drefled

!

dressed himself in a very smart manner, to the gentle. man's house. Will went in to the gentleman, and left his friend without to cool his heels, as the phrase is, in the antechamber, having acquainted him, that he should soon be called in and hired. The Carlisle lad waited a long time expecting the return of Will, who had flipt down a pair of back stairs and departed ; at laft the house-maid coming to fweep the rooms, found this young man walking backward and forward, and, instead of getting his place, he narrowly escaped being carried before juftice De Veil, on suspicion of having a felonious design on the house.

Many other changes and experiments were to have been attempted ; but Heaven always tries the virtues of a hero by some disappointments, which balk his hopes and baffle all his great designs; as you will see in the second part of our important history,

PART THE SECOND,

ON the fourteenth day of the same month of February, in the

very
fame
year

of our Lord one thou. sand feven hundred and forty-five, the right hon. earl Granville resigned the feals into his Majesty's hands, which his Majesty was pleased to deliver to his grace the duke of Newcastle, and to the right honourable the earl of Harrington. And thus endeth the second and last part of this aftonishing adminiftra

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