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Inbold, part, pa. 1309, L. W. 1932, heholden. Y-juped, part. pa: 17094, tricked, deceived. r=c}]«d, part. pa. T. i. 1090, relicved. See Lifjed. r-liche, y-like, adj. Sax. relembling, 594, 1541, equal,

2736. 2-liche, y-like, adv. Sax. equally, alike, 2528, 7796. Y-limed, part. pa.6516, limed, caught as with birulime. r-logged, part. pa. 14997, lodged. 2-inasked, part. pa. T, ii. 1740, mashed or mclied;

mosche, Belg. mucula retis, Kilian. 7-incint, part. pa, 2172, mingled, Y-mell, prep. Sax. among, 4169. Preneus, pr. a. Hymenzus, 2004. 2 Hough, ynowy, adv. Gax. enough, 11020, 13988. Yolden, part. pa. of yelde, given, 3054-yielded, T. ii.

1217--repaid, R. 4556. Yongbede, n. Sax. youth, R. 351. forc, adv. Sax, of a long time, 4692, 7044-a little

before, 9990myora agon, 13639, long ago; in olde

times yore, 9016; of time yore, 11275. Xove, pa. t. of yeur, C. I.. 688, gave. Youre, pron. pof. Sax. is usid for youres, 16776; T..

587; L. W.683; C. L. 755. Youres, pron. pori. Sax. ulcd generally when the noun

to which it belongs is understood or placed before it, 7495,8379, 10911; he was an old telaw of youres, 12606, he was an old companion of yours, i, o, of or

among your companions. See the Ebay, 80, n. 24. Youtbhede, n. Sax. youth, R. 4931. Yoxe, v. Sax. to hiccough, 4749, ypx"; fantia,

Prompt. Paie. 1-piked, part. pa. 367, picked, fpruce 7-queint, part. pa. 2752, quenchid. Y-reight, pa. i. F. iii. 284, reaclicada

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Y-reken, 3880, seems to be put for the old part. pr.

y-rekend, recking. Pren, n. Sax. iron, 1996, 6488. r-rent, part. pa. 5265, torn. Y-ronne, y-ronnen, part. pa. 3891, 2695, run. 2-fatuled, part. pa. 10279, settled, established. Yje, n. Sax. ice, F. iii. 40. 1-ferved, part. pa. treated, 965. 2-Seite, part. pa. 10487, set, placed, appointed, 1637. Yifbent, fart. pa. 6894, damaged. 7-Souve, part. pa. L. W. 726, pulhed forwards. 7-lawe, part. pa. 945, 4904, Nain. Yjope, pr. n. M. 264. So the name of the fabulist was

commonly wiitten, notwithstanding the distinction pointed out by the following technical verse;

Yfopus eft herba, fed Æsopus dat bona verba. In this and many other passages which are quoted from Æfop by writers of the middle ages it is not easy to say what author they mean: the Greek collections of fables which are now current under the name of Æfop were unknown, I apprehend, in this part of the world at the time that Melibee was written: Phadrus too had disappeared: Avienus indeed was very generally read. He is quoted as Æsop by John of Salisbury, Polycrat. l. vii. Ut Æfopo, vel Avieno, credas. - But the name of Æfop was

was chiefly appropriated to the anonymous * author of sixty

* Several improbable conjectures, which have been made with respect to the real name and age of this writer, may be seen in the Menagiana, vol.i. p. 172, and in Fabric. Bibl. Lat. vol. i. p. 376, ed. Patav. In the edition of these fables in 1503 the commentator (of no great authority I confess) mentions an opinion of some people that Galterus Angelicus fecit bunc librum fub nomine Flopi. I suppose the person meant was Gual. terus Anglicus, who had been tutor to William II. King of si

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fables in elegiack metre, which are printed in Ne

velet's collection under the title of Anonymi Fabula cily, and wasArchbishop of Palermo about the year 1170. I cannot believe that they were much older than his time, and in the beginning of the next century they seem to be mentioned under the name of Æfopus among the books commonly read in schools, by Eberhardus Bethuniensis in his Labyrinthus,traa. iii. de Versificatione, v. 11. See Leyser, Hift. Post. Med.Ævi.p. 826. About the middle of the same century (the 13th) Vincent of Beauvais, in his Speculum Hiftor. I. iii.c. 2, gives an account of Æsop, and a large specimen of his tables, quas Romulus qui. cam de Greco in Latinum transtulit, et aut filium suum Tyberi. num dirigit,: they are all, as I remember, in the printed Romu. lus. - Soon after the invention of printing that larger collection of the fables of Æsop was made and publithed in Germany which has been mentioned in vol. iv. p. 143, n.; it is divided into fix books, to which is prefixed a life of Æfop e Greco larina per Rimicium fatła. The three firft are composed of the fixty elegiack fables of the metrical Ælopus, with a few trifling variations, and to each of them is subjoined a fable on the fame subjca in prose from Romnulus; book iv.contains the remaining fables of Romulus in profe only. The tifth book has not more than one or two fables which had ever appeared before under the name of Æfop; the rest are taken from the Gefia Romanorum, the Calilahu Damnih, (See vol. iv. p. 138, n. *, p. 141,1. 1,] and other obscurer authors. The fixth and last book contains seventeen fables with the following title, Sequuntur fabule nove Esopi ex translatione Remicii. There has been a great diversity of opinion among learned men concerning this Remicius or Rimicius, [See Pref. Nilant, ] while some have confounded him with the fictitious Romulus, and others have considered him as the editor of this collection. I have no doubt that the person meant is that Rinucius who trandated the life of Æfop by Planudes and ninety-fix of his fables from the Greek into Latin, about the iniddle of the 15th century. [See Fabric. Bibl. Medt. Æt. in v. Rimicius. in his trandation of the epifties of Hippocrates, inf. Hirl. 3527, he is styled in one place Verdenjis, and in another Caftilione njis.] All the fables from Re

r-reken, 3880, seems to be put for the old part. pr.

y-rekend, recking. Yren, n. Sax. iron, 1996,6488. r-rent, part. pa. 5265, torn. Y-ronne, y-ronnen, part. pa. 3891, 2695, run. 7--Jateled, part. pa. 10279, settled, established. Yje, n. Sax. ice, F. iii. 40. Y-ferved, part. pa. treated, 965. 7-feite, part. pa. 10487, set, placed, appointed, 1637. 7.fbent, part. pa. 6894, damaged. 7-fsuve, part. pa. L. W. 726, puned forwards, 7-slawe, part. pa. 945, 4904, lain. 1/ope, pr. n. M. 264. So the name of the fabulist was

commonly wiitten, notwithstanding the distinction pointed out by the following technical verse;

Ysopus eft herba, fed Æsopus dat bona verba. In this and many other passages which are quoted from Æfop by writers of the middle ages it is not easy to say what author they mean: the Greek collections of fables which are now current under the name of Æfop were unknown, I apprehend, in this part of the world at the time that Melibee was written: Phadrus too had disappeared: Avienus indeed was very generally read. He is quoted as Æsop by John of Salisbury, Polycrat. I. vii. Ut Æfopo, vel Avieno, credas. - But the name of Æfop was chiefly appropriated to the anonymous * author of sixty

* Several improbable conjectures, which have been made with respect to the real name and age of this writer, may be seen in the Menagiana, vol.i. p. 172, and in Fabric. Bibl. Lat. vol. i. p. 376, ed. Patav. In the edition of these fables in 1503 the commentator (of no great authority I confess) mentions an opinion of some people that Galterus Angelicus fecit burc librum fub nomine Ffopi. I fuppofe the person meant was Gualterus Anglicus, who had been tutor to William II. King of Si

fables in elegiack metre, which are printed in Ne

velet's collection under the title of Anonymi Fabula cily, and wasArchbishop of Palermo about the year 1170. I cannot believe that they were much older than his time, and in the beginning of the next century they seem to be mentioned under the name of Æfopus among the books commonly read in schools, by Eberhardus Bethunienfis in his Labyrinthus,traa. iii. de Versificatione, v. 11. See Leyfer, Hift. Poat. Med.Ævi.p. 826. About the middle of the same century (the 1 3th) Vincent of Beauvais, in his Speculum Hifior. I. iii.c. 2, gives an account of Æsop, and a large specimen of his fables, quas Romulus qui. cam de Greco in Latinum transtulit, et aut filium fuum Tyberinum dirigit,: they are all, as I remember, in the printed Romu. lus. —Soon after the invention of printing that larger coliection of the fables of Æsop was made and publithed in Germany which has been mentioned in vol. iv. p. 143, n.; it is divided into fix books, to which is prefixed a life of Æsop e Græro l.a. rina per Rimicium faéta. The three firft are composed of the fixty elegiack fables of the metrical Ælopus, with a few trifling variations, and to each of them is subjoined a fable on the same subje& in prose from Romulus; book iv.contains the remaining fables of Romulus in prose only. The fifth book has not more than one or two fables which had ever appeared before under the name of Æfop; the rest are taken from the Gesta Romanorum, the Calilah u Damnah, [See vol. iv. p. 138, n. *, p. 141, n. 1,) and other obicurer authors. The fixth and laft bouk contains seventeen fables with the following title, Sequuntur fabule nove Egopi ex translatione Remicii. There has been a great diversity of opinion among learned men concerning this Remicius or Rimicius, [See Præf. Nilant,) while fomc have confounded him with the fictitious Romulus, and others have confidered him as the editor of this colection. I have no doubt that the perfoo meant is that Rinucius who tranlated the life of Æfop by Planudes ar.d ninety.fix of his fables from the Greek into Latin, about the iniddle of the 15th century. (See Fabric. Bibl. Met. Æt. in v. Rimicius. In his trandation of the epiftles of Hippocrates, inf. Hırl. 3527, he is styled in one place Verdensis, and in another caftilionezjis.] All the fables from Re

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