Louis Fourteenth, and the Writers of His Age: Being a Course of Lectures Delivered (in French) to a Select Audience in New York

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J. P. Jewett, 1855 - 413 oldal
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260. oldal - tis not to me she speaks: Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven, Having some business, do entreat her eyes To twinkle in their spheres, till they return. What if her eyes were there, they in her head; The brightness of her cheek would shame those stars, As daylight doth a lamp; her eye in heaven Would through the airy region stream so bright, That birds would sing, and think it were not night.
260. oldal - But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks! It is the east, and Juliet is the sun ! — Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, Who is already sick and pale with grief, That thou her maid art far more fair than she...
260. oldal - I will answer it. 1 am too bold; 'tis not to me she speaks. Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven, Having some business, do entreat her eyes To twinkle in their spheres till they return.
346. oldal - Woe unto you, Scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye are like unto whited sepulchres, which indeed appear beautiful outward, but are within full of dead men's bones, and of all uncleanness.
251. oldal - But by pursuing closely one argument, which is not cloyed with many turns, the French have gained more liberty for verse, in which they write ; they have leisure to dwell on a subject which deserves it ; and to represent the passions (which we have acknowledged to be the poet's work), without being hurried from one thing to another...
251. oldal - But he is always great when some great occasion is presented to him; no man can say he ever had a fit subject for his wit, and did not then raise himself as high above the rest of poets *Quantum lenta solent inter viburna cupressi.
247. oldal - Romantic poetry, on the other hand, is the expression of the secret attraction to a chaos which lies concealed in the very bosom of the ordered...
247. oldal - ... its fragmentary appearance, approaches more to the secret of the universe. For Conception can only comprise each object separately, but nothing in truth can ever exist separately and by itself; Feeling perceives all in all at one and the same time.
148. oldal - Yes, if the life and death of Socrates are those of a sage, the life and death of Jesus are those of a God.

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