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THEY RETURN TO PLYMOUTH.

229

XIV.

1621.

fishing-ground.' Many, yea most of the islands have CHAP. been inhabited, some being cleared from end to end. But the people are all dead, or removed.

Our victual growing scarce, the wind coming fair, and having a light moon, we set out at evening, and through the goodness of God came safely home before Sept. noon the day following 3

22.

trance of Boston bay. It is sup They were absent on this expe-
posed that in this or some subse. dition four days. Winslow was
quent voyage the three Brewsters probably one of the party, and
were named in honor of their ven wrote this account.
erable elder, and Point Alderton,

“ All the

summer no want. the head-land of Nantasket, after While some were trading, others Isaac Allerton. See note on page were fishing cod, bass, &c. We 195.

now gather in our harvest; and as ! The neighbourhood of these cold weather advances, como in rocks is excellent fishing-ground. storo of water fowl, wherewith this

. They had been swept off by the place abounds, though afterwards pestilence mentioned on pago 184. ihoy by degrees decrease ; as also

• Governor Bradford adds, " with abundance of wild turkeys, with a considerable quantity of beaver, venison, &c. Fit our houses against and a good report of the place, winter, are in health, and have all wishing we had been seated there." things in plenty.” Bradford, in Prince, p. 198.

Prince, p. 198.

CHAPTER XV.

A LETTER SENT FROM NEW ENGLAND TO A FRIEND IN THESE
PARTS, SETTING FORTH A BRIEF AND TRUE DECLARATION
OF THE WORTH OF THAT PLANTATION; AS ALSO CERTAIN
USEFUL DIRECTIONS FOR SUCH AS INTEND A VOYAGE INTO
THOSE PARTS.

XV.

CHAP. Loving AND OLD FRIEND,'

Although I received no letter from you by this 162 1. ship, yet forasmuch as I know you expect the per11. formance of my promise, which was, to write unto

you truly and faithfully of all things, I have therefore at this time sent unto you accordingly, referring you for further satisfaction to our more large Relations."

You shall understand that in this little time that a few of us have been here, we have built seven dwelling-houses and four for the use of the plantation, and have made preparation for divers others. We set the last spring some twenty acres of Indian corn, and

page 113.

"This letter I think was addressed help, showing us how to set, fish, to George Morton. See note on dress, and tend it.' Bradford, in

Prince, p. 190. The Indians' seaThe Fortune, in which this let son for planting the maize was ter and the preceding Journal were “ when the leaves of the white oak sent to England.

are as big as the ear of a mouse." • The preceding narrative. See Belknap's Hist. of New Hamp* See note ? on page 173.

shire, iii. 70. • " Wherein Squanto is a great

THE FIRST THANKSGIVING.

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XV.

Dec. 11.

sowed some six acres of barley and pease; and ac- CHAP. cording to the inanner of the Indians, we manured our ground with herrings, or rather shads, which we 1621. have in great abundance, and take with great ease at our doors. Our corn did prove well; and, God be praised, we had a good increase of Indian corn, and our barley indifferent good, but our pease not worth the gathering, for we feared they were too late sown. They came up very well, and blossomed; but the sun parched them in the blossom.

Our harvest being gotten in, our governor a sent four men on fowling, that so we might, after a special manner, rejoice together after we had gathered the fruit of our labors. They four in one day killed as much fowl as, with a little help beside, served the company

almost a week. At which time, amongst other recreations, we exercised our arms, many of the Indians coming amongst us, and among the rest their greatest king, Massasoyt, with some ninety men, whom for three days we entertained and feasted; and they went out and killed five deer, which they brought to the plantation, and bestowed on our governor, and upon the captain and others. And although it be not always so plentiful as it was at this time with us, yet by the goodness of God we are so

7, says,

,' Or rather alewives. Morton, in and an acre thus dressed will prohis New English Canaan, b. ii. ch. duce and yield so much corn as

" There is a fish, by some three acres without fish." The called shads, by some allizes, that Indians used to put two or three at the spring of the year pass up fishes into every corn-hill. the rivers to spawn in the ponds ; · Bradford. and are taken in such multitudes in 3 This was the first Thanksgivevery river that hath a pond at the ing, the harvest festival of New end, that the inhabitants dung their England. On this occasion they ground with them. You may sce no doubt feasted on the wild turkey in one lownship a hundred acres as well as venison. See notes on together set with these fish, every page 229. acre taking a thousand of them ;

A See note

on page 175.

232

THE INDIANS WELL-DISPOSED.

XV.

1621. Dec. 11.

us.

CHAP. far from want, that we often wish you partakers of * our plenty.

We have found the Indians very faithful in their covenant of peace with us, very loving, and ready to pleasure us. We often go to them, and they come to

Some of us have been fisty miles 2 by land in the country with them, the occasions and relations whereof you shall understand by our general and more full declaration of such things as are worth the noting. Yea, it hath pleased God so to possess the Indians with a fear of us and love unto us, that not only the greatest king amongst them, called Massasoyt, but also all the princes and peoples round about us, have either made suit unto us, or been glad of any occasion to make peace with us; so that seven of them at once have sent their messengers to us to that end. Yea, an isle at sea,which we never saw, hath also, together with the former, yielded willingly to be under the protection and subject to our sovereign lord King James. So that there is now great peace amongst the Indians

" This representation was rather Ohquamehud, Chikkatabak, too encouraging, as will be seen

Саопасоте,

Quadaquina, hereafier.

Obbatinnua, Muttmoiden, : Winslow himself had been to Nallawahunt, Apannow.Pokanoket, a distance of forty

Caunbatani, miles. Sec page 208.

3 Morton has preserved in his Cawnacome was the sachem of Memorial, p. 67, the following do. Manomet, or Sandwich, Caunbacument,

tant of Mattapuyst, or Swanzey,

and Chikkatabak, of Neponset. September 13, anno Dom. 1621.

Quadequina was the brother of “Know all men by these presents, Massasoit, and A pannow was prothat we, whose names are under- bably Aspinet, the sachem of Nauwritten, do acknowledge ourselves Obbatinua is supposed to have to be the loyal subjects of King been the same as Obbatinewat, the James, king of Great Britain, sachem of Shawmut, or Boston. France, and Ireland, Defender of But see note on page 225. the Faith, &c. In witness where * Capawack, or Nope, Martha's of, and as a testimonial of the Vineyard. See Bradlord, in Prince, same,

have subscribed p. 195, and Mass. llisi. Coll. xii. names or marks, as followeth : 89.

set.

we

our

THE CLIMATE OF NEW ENGLAND.

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XV.

Dec. 11.

themselves, which was not formerly, neither would chap. have been but for us ; and we, for our parts, walk as peaceably and safely in the wood as in the highways 1621. in England. We entertain them familiarly in our houses, and they as friendly bestowing their venison on us. They are a people without any religion or knowledge of any God,' yet very trusty, quick of apprehension, ripe-witted, just. The men and women go naked, only a skin about their middles.

For the temper of the air here, it agreeth well with that in England; and if there be any difference at all, this is somewhat hotter in summer. Some think it to be colder in winter; but I cannot out of experience so say.

The air is very clear, and not soggy, as hath been reported. I never in my life remember a more seasonable year than we have here enjoyed ; and if we have once but kine, horses, and sheep, I make no question but men might live as contented here as in any part of the world. For fish and fowl, we have great abundance. Fresh cod in the summer is but coarse meat with us. Our bay is full of lobsters' all the summer, and affordeth variety of other fish. In September we can take a hogshead of eels in a night, with small labor, and can dig them out of their beds all the winter. We have muscles and othus 5 at our doors. Oysters we have none

he says,

4

1

The writer of this letter, Ed ? The writer himself was the ward Winslow, afterwards correct first to bring over cattle to the planed this statement in his Good News tation, in 1624 — a bull and ihree from New England. “Whereas,' heisers. See Prince, p. 225. myself and others in for 3 See note

on page 164, and mer letters, (which came to the press also page 205. ag: ainst my will and knowledge,)

• See note

on page 196. wrote that the Indians about us are o This I think a typographical a people without any religion, or error* for cther - the word shellknowledge of any God, therein 1 fish being accidentally ornitted ; or erred, though we could then gather perhaps the word in the MS, was no better."

clams.

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