Elements of Criticism

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Conner & Cooke, 1833 - 504 oldal
 

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363. oldal - The moon shines bright: in such a night as this, When the sweet wind did gently kiss the trees, And they did make no noise; in such a night, Troilus methinks mounted the Trojan wall, And sigh'd his soul towards the Grecian tents, Where Cressid lay that night. Merchant of Venice, Act V. Sc. 1.
290. oldal - XXIII. 144. But when loud surges lash the sounding shore, The hoarse rough verse should like the torrent roar. Pope's Essay on Criticism, 369. Dire Scylla there a scene of horror forms, And here Charybdis fills the deep with storms: When the tide rushes from her rumbling caves, The rough rock roars: tumultuous boil the waves.
416. oldal - showers; and sweet the coming on Of grateful evening mild, the silent night With this her solemn bird, and this fair moon, And these the gems of heav'n, her starry train. But neither breath of morn, when she ascends With charm of earliest birds, nor rising sun On this delightful land, nor herb, fruit, flow'r,
358. oldal - give examples. Antony, mourning over the body of Caesar murdered in the senate-house, vents his passion in the following words Antony, O pardon me thou bleeding piece of earth, That I am meek and gentle with these butchers. Thou art the ruins of the noblest man That ever lived in the tide of time. Julius
250. oldal - (O heav'n! a beast that wants discourse of reason, Would have mourn'd longer)—married with mine uncle, My father's brother; but no more like my father, Than I to Hercules. Within a month! Ere yet the salt of most unrighteous tears Had left the flushing in her gauled eyes, Like Niobe, all tears Why she, ev'n she—
416. oldal - statutes; he shall not die for the iniquity of his father; be shall surely live, The soul that sinneth, it shall die; the son shall not bear the iniquity of the father, neither shall the father bear the iniquity of the son; the righteousness of
378. oldal - Figuring human life to be a voyage at sea: There is a tide in the affairs of men, Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune; Omitted, all the voyage of their life Is bound in shallows and in miseries. On such a full sea are we now afloat, And we must take the current while it
407. oldal - Do cream and mantle like a standing pond; And do a wilful stillness entertain, With purpose to be dress'd in an opinion Of wisdom, gravity, profound conceit ; As who should say, I am Sir Oracle, And when I ope my lips, let no dog bark! O
116. oldal - Show scarce so gross as beetles. Half-way down Hangs one that gathers samphire; dreadful trade! Methinks he seems no bigger than his head. The fishermen that walk upon the beach, Appear like mice; and yon tall anchoring bark Diminish'd to her cock ; her cock, a buoy That on
362. oldal - 1 Can'st thou, O partial Sleep, give thy repose To the wet sea-boy in an hour so rude; And, in the calmest and the stillest night, With all appliances and means to boot, Deny it to a King 1 Then, happy low! lie down Uneasy lies the head that wears a

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