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vi.

C~THE DIVINE ORIGIN OF SCRIPTURES. 24.—Harmony

of Nature, Reason, and Revelation.

SECTION V.-ANALYSIS OF THE MOSAIC NAR

RATIVE.

- WORK DONE BEFORE THE SIX DAYS. 25.-Heaven and earth-Water.

b_WORK DONE DURING THE Six Days. 26.-Light

Atmosphere—Land—Vegetation—Luminaries-Fish and Fowl. 27.-Cattle and Beasts-Man-Food for man and animals.

- DEDUCTIONS FROM THE FOREGOING ANALYSIS. 28.The Universe not made in six days—Absence of lifeEach day complete-Plants of the Coal Measures all excluded-Also, Forest Trees and Medicinal PlantsAll Carnivora excluded from the Mosaic Narrative.

SECTION VI.-THE FACTS OF SCIENCE WHICH

BEAR ON THIS SUBJECT.

- THE PHYSICAL STRUCTURE OF THE EARTH'S CRUST. 29.- Temperature-Substances contract in coolingWater and Bismuth-Exceptions—The Earth not a fused mass, encased. 30.-Rocks in Strata-Fossils in all Rocks-Eozoon Canadense. 31. --Creation, progressive. 32.—Division of Rocks, purely conventional-Life on Earth never ceased since first introduced-Origin of

existing Species. b_THE STRATA OF THE EARTH CLASSIFIED. 33.-Post

tertiary Period. 34.-Origin of Man-Rosacec-Appearance of Sheep, Camels, &c.

35.- The Tertiary. 36.--Mammals and Birds—Cotyledonous PlantsCereals. 37.-Secondary Rocks. 38.-Saurians-First appearance of Cycloids and Ctenoids—Changes among Fish. 39.—Primary. 40.--Coal-Devonian FishLaurentian Fossils.

vii.

SECTION VII.-THEORIES OF RECONCILIATION. 0—THE FIRST THEORY DEFINED. 41.-Definition. 42.

-Modifications. 43.- Fossils created. 44.- Fossils

deposited since Adam-Objections. 6—THE SECOND THEORY DEFINED. 45.-Definition.

46.—Adopted by Chalmers and Buckland. 47.- The
Punctists and Christian Fathers, on Genesis i. 2. 48.
Destruction of all at the close of the Tertiary. 49.
Geology on this point--Existing creation dates back
to the Eocene. 50.—Poetic exaggeration. 51.-Tohu
Vabohu. 52.-“Without form." 53.-" Void.” 54.
-Objections.
-THE THIRD THEORY DEFINED. 56.-Definition. 57.

65.—Exposition. 66.-A day 1,000 years. OBJECTIONS TO THE PERIOD THEORY. 67.-It assumes

the days to be unequal perioils—Dr. McCaul's hypothesis. 69.-It makes the day long. 70-72.—The Scripture use of the word day. 73.—Tt assumes the existence of plants before animals--palæontology. 74.—Dr. McAussand's modification. 75.-On the word “moved.”. Genesis i. 2. 77.-Fourth objection. 78.--Origin of coal. 79.–Plants of the coal measures. 80.—The most important plants not in the coal. 81.-Number and classification of coal plants. 82-85.- The plants of Genesis. 86.-On the word “grass.” 88-89.-On the word “herb.” 90.-Fifth objection. 91.-On “great whales "--On“ fowls.” 92.-Inconsistency of Scripture statement when viewed on this Theory-Birds of the Tertiary. 93. ---Sixth objection. 94.-On 'cattle." 95.-On “creeping things.” 96.-On “beasts." 98.-

Summary. d-THE FOURTH THEORY DEFINED. 99.-Definition.

100.—Dr. Pye Smith. 101.--Estimate of his Theory. 102.--Objections—On “heaven and earth." 103.

Local darkness. 104.-The local absence of life. e.-THE FIFTH THEORY DEFINED. 105.-Definition.

106.— The Bible, a book for man, and refers to the origin of man, not of all things. 108.--Unity of Genesis i. & ii., 1-4-The host of heaven-On the word “heaven.” 109.-On the words earth." 110.--Use of eretz in Scripture. lll.-On the word “bara," created. 112. -
Use of, in Scripture. 114.—On the word “darkness.”

SECTION IX.-EXPOSITION OF THE MOSAIC

NARRATIVE.

123.

“The beginning

" Ehohim Created"

“Heaven and earth.' 124.—“The deep

-“Spirit

_Hebrew superlative. 125. “ God said." 133.-On
signs. 134.-Races of men. 136.-Finished work.

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SECTION X.-A NEW TRANSLATION.

139.-Introduction. 140.—The first day's work-Light.

141.-The atmosphere cleared. 142.-Land, rivers, and
plants formed. 143.-Heavenly bodies appear. 144. -
Formation of fish. 145.—Creation of many domestic
animals—The oreation of man-Allotment of food.
146.-Summary and conclusion,

SECTION 1.--INTRODUCTION.*

1. In the bosom of a lofty hill reposed a village, inhabited by seafaring sons of toil. These simple men had brave hearts; they were also trained to valiant deeds, and were well accustomed to witness the frowning form of death riding on raging waves, which washed to shore many a human form ’mid fragments of shattered ships. One night two orphan children-poor, but loving sisters—wandered on the beach, far from the homes of men and from the place of their abode, for home they had not since their mother died. Men and women sought them that dark night, with lighted torches blazing in their hands. Their shouts rose high above the crash of billows, whose breakers roared against projecting crags. All efforts failed to find them. The dark and dreary night passed by, and the clear morning lighted up the scene, as the sun emerged from the rosy chambers of the east, and made the snow, which now lay thick upon the ground, look like a sea of blazing light, and the sea itself a sea of polished metal.

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* The introduction has reference to the circumstances under which the Lecture was delivered, rather than to the subject to be discussed; but it is retained here by desire.

In a sheltered nook, beneath vast threatening rocks, and looking toward the east, the two lost children were discovered, both rigid, cold, and dead. The sun smiled on them as he rose, and his

rays

of gold fell warm upon their lifeless forms, and lighted up the pale, but pleasant countenance of the elder sister. The crowd gazed upon them with admiration as they saw them seated with their dark shadows falling on the white snow. Women wrung their hands in grief, and looked heavenward as if they felt that the gate of heaven was not far off. Strong and daring men were seen to bury their faces in their brawny hands, and weep like women. What touched the hearts of these, and made them weep? It was not the sight of death; that was but a common sight to them. They had often witnessed sadder scenes upon the beach. Why, then, do they weep? Not because they see two flowers so young and fair nipped by the freezing air, and blasted before they had bloomed - not because two bright and lovely stars have fallen from the sky, as falls the glittering crown from royal brow, when the assassin deals his blow.

The children sat like statues of purest marble upon the pure snow. The elder sat upon the ground with the younger upon her knees. She had taken off her shawl and had wrapt her youthful charge in its thick folds to keep her warm, and placed her tiny

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