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Meteorological Register, kept at the Surveyor General's Office, Calcutta, for the month of January, 1838. Mioimum Tein perature Maximum Pressure Observations made at Maximum temperature

Minimum Pressure

Observations made at observed at sun rise, observed at 9h. 50m.

Apparent Noon.
observed at 2h. 40m.

observed at 4h. Om.
Temperature. Wind. Temperature. Wind. Temperature.

Wind. Temperature. Wind. Temperature. Wiod. Temperature Wind

sunset.

Rain Gauge.

N.

N.

N.

W.

N

N.

N.

,030 67,3 71,066,0 N. E, |, 000 68,5] 78,0 73,8 m. E. 1,950 70,0 79,7 74.5 x. E. 1,930l 69,3 75,372,6| N. E.,940|68,865,0|65,0| Cm.
,06669,972,867,0) N. E. ,030 72,3 77,7 69,5 N. E. ,980 73,8 78,0 73,6 N. E. ,960 73,0 73,7 72,5 ,972 71,3 66,679,01 Cm.
,050 65,5 67,061,3 ,020 69,5 73,7 67,0 ,973 70,7 75,070,0 N. w.1,966 69,0 72,0 68,2 x. w.,978 68,265,067,9
,038 66,0 67,3 62,0 N. ,002 69,5 73,0 68,0 N. W. ,947 70,075,0 70,8 x.b w.1,942 69,6 73,4169,8 N. w. ,953 68,0 67,967,5 Cm.
,012 66,0 66,0 61,0 N. w. 1986 69,8 73,0) 68,5 w.bx. ,902 71,275,2 70,9 N. w.,898 70,11 73,469,7 N. w. ,906 68,0 67,5 67,3 Cm.
,951 66,3 69,063,0 w.b n. 1923 70,4 74,6 70,4 W. ,877 72,7 77,0 71,0 W. ,870 72,5 74,3 70,2 ,880108,567,767,41 Cm.
,000 66,5 70,064,9 ,970) 70,8 75,0 70,8w.bn.,920 72,7| 77,5 70,9 w.b n.,913 70,8 73,869,9 w.bn. ,920 68,3 57,0 67,0 Cm.
,012 68,9 71,565,5 ,978 71,7| 79,8 74,0 N. W.,914 73,6 81,076,0 N. w..906 72,0 76,372,7 N. w.1,916170,5 70,771,11 Cm.
,990 67,065,265,3 s. w. ,965 71,3 76,4 73,0 W. ,918 73,5 79,0 73,9 W.

.909 71,5

76,773,5 W ,918 70,068,368,5 Cm. ,030 67,3 69,564,8 N.b E. ,000 70,7 75,0 70,8 ,970 71,4 77,9 73,2 W. ,955 69,8 74,3 70,0

W

,96169,568,270,0 Cm.
,028 66,8 69,8 63,5 W. ,006 71,6 76,5 71,0 N. ,964 73,4 79,0 73,2 N. ,962 71,5 75,5 72,9 N. ,974 70,068,5 69,3 Cm.
,014 67,0 68,064,5 N. ,988 71,0 75,471,0 ,934 72,079,2 73,4 N. E. 1.934 71,376,072,3 N. ,948 70,2 69,070,3 Cm.
,034 67,8 71,065,5 N. ,011 70,9 75,2 71,01 N. ,9701 71,779,073,2 N. ,966 71,075,5 72,0 N.
,046 66,0 63,5 65,3 N. ,010 68,0 77,5 73,6 N. 1976| 71,2 79,01 73,5 N. ,966 69,776,0/72,7 N. ,973 69,068,868,8 Cm.
,060 65,9 69,064,2 N. ,040 71,4 77,072,5 ,974 73,5 0,01 75,0n.h w.,900 71,5 75,773,0 N.b w..970 70,0 68,7 69,5 Cm.
,088, 68,5 72,365,0 N. ,070 71,5 77,871,1 W 1,024 73,0 81,074,5 ,022 73,277,073,3 W. ,02470, 1 69,969,0 Cm.
,092 66,4 68,963,2 N. ,069 71,0| 77,0 71,01 W ,000 73,5 78,5 73,2 s.b w ,978 73,2 76,372,9 s. bw.1,978/70,369,070,2 Cm.
,000 70,5 72,068,71 S. ,990 75,2 77,8 73,0 ss. w.,932 76,4 81,275,21 s. w. 1,952 76,71 79,675,0 s. w. ,938 72,7171,5 71,5
,122 69,0 71,566,1 N. E.,098 73,6 78,073,4 ,044 73,279,073,5 N.b E.,044 72,8 76,0/73,0 N.b E. .06070,669,2 69,3 Cm.
,178 67,9 69,2 64,2 N. ,138 72,0 75,070,5 N. ,068 72,6 77,8 71,5 N.b E.,050 72,9 74,6 72,5 N. ,056 70,5 69,069,0 Cm.
,097/66,0 68,8 63,5 N. ,0661 68,075,070,8 N. ,000 68,077,5 71,7) N. ,998 68,5 74,072,0 N. ,007 68,0 68,8|68,5 Cm.'
,090 66,3 66,8 62,0 n. bw. ,058 70,11 76,0 69,7 N. ,004 72,476,2 72,6 W. 1,000 71,3 76,272,7 N. ,002 69,1 67,969,2
,114 66,8 70,263,4 N. ,090 71,7| 77,8 71,0 N. w.,02673,079,2 73,7x. w.,020 72,0 77,5 73,5 n. w. ,024 69,5 69,3 68,71 Cm.
,110 66,3 72,5 65,8 N. ,090 70,878,872,41 m. ,024 72,41 79,0 72,3 N. 1,016 72,0 78,074,2 N. ,024 70,070,070,8 Cm.
,140 66,3 69,065,0 N. 118 71,4 76,2 68,0 N. W.1,050 72,8 77,9 72,0 N. w. ,03072,5 74,872,3 N. w.,036 70,6 69,2 69,5 Cm.
,114 67,0 70,864,0 N. w. 1,995 73,1 76,5 70,0 N. 1,03075,579,5 73,2 N. w.,022 73,6 77,573,0 N. w.,022 70,870,970,9 cm.
,098 67,5 71,064,5 N. ,066 73,979,072,0 N. 1,999 76,4 84,5 81,3 x.b w.,980 75,0 81,781,3 N. W. ,994 71,371,271,2 Cm.
,000 68.3 72,365,5

,092 69,6 80,7 73,0 W. 1,047| 72,7 85.3 81,8 1,023 72,5 82,081,5 w.nw.,030 72,080,079,8 Cm. ,005 69,8 73,3 67,0 W ,990 77,8 83,2 73,0 N, w.,954 79,3 66,0| 77,0

,938 79,0 83,276,2 N. ,942 72,974,872,8 N. ,02 69,6 70,8 68,2

,012 74,1 79,6 74,8 N. ,972 79,31 85,0 72,4 N. 960 79,3 83,878,0 N. 96273.576,5 76,0 Cm. ,080171,3 76,169,0 N. E. ,062 75,8 81,01 73,0 N.DE,982 75,9 83,0 75,1

73,7) 80,674,7

,972/71,0/72, 273, Cm.

W.

N.

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W.

W.

N.

29,970 62,557,6 56,0 Cm. 30,020 63,3 57,0 58,5 N.

,000 62,0 55,0 56,2 N.

,003162,9 50,8 51,9 Cm.
29,972|62,8 51,0 52,8 Cm.

,917 63,2 52,0 53,0 Cm.
,930 63,251,2 53,0 Cm.
,929 64,3 53,5 54,7 Cm
,968 64,5155,8 56,9 Cm
,980 61,0 53,0 54,3 Cm.
,932 63.454,0 55,11 Cm.
,992 64,3 54,5 54,5 Cm.
,996 61,7 55,0 56,0 Cm.

30,010 64,0 53,2 54,0 Cm.

,036 63,5 53,0 53,8 cm

,040 63,0 52,3 53,5 Cm
29,945 63,8 55,0 57,0 Cm
30,070 62,9 53,0 54,9 Cm.

,090/62,655,1 55,0 N.
,022 62,250,0 51,5 Cm.
,010 62,2 49,0 51,0 Cm.
,051 62,5 50,0 51,91 Cm.
,04462,752,0 52,91 Cm.
,058 62,0 50,0 51,6 Cm.
,058 63,751,8 52,9 N

,030 63,8 51,9 63,0 Cm.
29.992 64,6 55,7 56,4 W.

,953 65,067,9 59,0 Cm.

,986 68,563,0 63,5 Cm. 80,018 68,060,0 161,2

Cra .

N.

N.

THE

CALCUTTA CHRISTIAN OBSERVER.

No. 71.—April, 1838.

1.-The connexion of the British Government with the Ido

latry of India.

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The connexion of the British Government with the idolatry of India, has become a subject of deep interest and solicitude to the philanthropists of Britain and of India. The feelings of the religious and humane at home have been excited towards the subject, and their first energies put forth to effect a separation of the unholy alliance between the powers of darkness and the representatives of a Christian people in a heathen country; an alliance as disgraceful to the country we represent, as it is opposed to the reforming principles and practice of professedly liberal statesmen, and a blot--a most foul blot-on a system of Government matured by the statesmen of a Christian nation. We feel assured that those feelings have but to be legitimately wrought upon and that energy rightly directed, to effect " the consummation so devoutly to be wished.” Feeling that we, who are on the spot, have a part to play in this important drama, as well as those at home, our inquiry has been in what way can our efforts and energies apply with the greatest advantage to the good cause? We have been led to the conclusion that, as violence is to be deprecated in the advocacy of all truth, so agitation of a violent character would be impolitic in this, until the public mind shall be enlightened upon a subject on which we wish it to feel in unison with ourselves, and to act as with the energy of one man. We were the more inclined to this peaceful but, we hope, effectual way of effecting our design, from the fact that a large proportion of those who might be expected to understand the subject are but very imperfectly informed either as to the nature or influence of the connexion reprobated and condemned. We have therefore determined to publish periodically, as matter may present itself and opportunities

VII. 2 c

serve, the most accurate information relative to this subject, accompanied by remarks dictated, not by the love of party, but by a sincere desire to advance the cause of equity and truth. In order that the information obtained may not lose its force by going forth under an anonymous signature, a provisional committee has been organized, whose object it will be to inquire into the accuracy of such statements as are presented for publication. It is hoped that while this may, on the one hand, be a check upon exaggerated reports, it will on the other give a character and influence to the statements which they could not possibly derive from individual influence however potent. We have no party purposes to serve in this matter ; the advocacy and advancement of true religion, the upholding of public morals, and the protection and extension of civil and religious liberty-these are the only causes that “move us to the deed.” We firmly believe them all to be retarded, prostrated or impeded, by the connexion which at this moment subsists between a Government exclusively composed of professedly Christian men representing a Christian people in a heathen land, and the idolatry of the country. In carrying out our intention, we have no wish to touch men but measures ; nor to attack Jagannath or the Imámbárá separately, but the great principle of the union ; hoping, if we should succeed in showing that to be at variance with civil freedom, moral rectitude, and

religious truth, we shall have made out a case that must induce “ the powers that be,” to say of the idolatry of India, “ Thy money,” if we must administer it for such purposes,“ perish with thee!" Should we employ in this or any future papers in this series, a word or expression that may appear to bear with undue severity on those whom we respect in high places, we once for all disavow any thing personal or a desire unnecessarily to wound; we entreat them to believe that our love of truth would rather induce us " in calmest reason” to beseech them to retire from the questionable position which as the followers of Christ they now hold. Rather would we do this, than rashly wound and exasperate; and we hope our regard for truth would not only induce us to expostulate with them, but to sacrifice on its altar the most endeared connexion we may or can have, were it necessary, to vindicate the insulted Majesty of Heaven. We most willingly concede to them sincerity of intention, while it is not only our duty, but our imperative duty, to reprobate the position in which they are content to remain, withal most sacredly protesting against the dark measures to which they often affix not only their official seals but also their signatures. How sinful must it appear in the eyes of the Omniscient, when a poor deluded pilgrim casts himself for salvation at the feet of jagannáth, that the regulation

which sanctions the deed and the ticket which obtains him admittance within the pale of the refuge of lies," are signed if not actually approved, by otherwise sincere followers of Jesus ! Oh! are there no Daniels, no Ezras, no noble-spirited men amongst the high and powerful, who can rise superior to the vulgar and enslaved prejudices of the world ? men who will by washing their hands of these evils set a nobly contagious example? We are not unmindful that many of these are diligently endeavouring to promote the object so near our heart, and we hope, though we cannot approve their timid policy, that, as the mysteries of divine Providence are explained by the great and all-wise Interpreter Himself, it will be seen that our great purpose will be ultimately subserved even by their fluttering residence within, as well as by our more daring flights without, the idolatrous pale. Our warmth and their prudential proceedings may both be essential to place things in such a state as, the more effectually, at some future period, to sever the connexion at once and for ever. We think the time has come, however, when it would be impious in us either to be silent or calm on such a topic ; patience alone has done nothing to remedy the evil; nor, were it exercised for some coming ages, unaided by a fearless yet true exposure of things as they are, would it meet with other reward than disappointment and chagrin. As we impute no evil motives eren to those who oppose us, much less to such as cannot accompany us the full extent of our feeling and action on this subject, we crave the mere indulgence of being permitted to pursue our work, without the imputation of improper motives, and we hope we shall be able to avoid every thing which might exasperate or increase the opposition of the abettors of the system.

Many of our friends appear to be comparatively in the clouds on the subject of the Government connexion with Idolatry, either as to its nature or influence. It may not therefore be impolitic to state that the connexion involves matters pecuniary, civil, moral and religious. The union does not subsist merely between the Government and Hindu temples and holy places, but extends also to Mussolman mosques and places of holy resort. The Revenue is derived from endowments of land and money, from the incomes of temples, religious places and mosques, from taxes paid by devotees and pilgrims,—from the accumulated and accumulating lakhs of the Imámbárás; and from the miserable rupee of the hunted and infatuated pilgriın. The immediate sanction which is given by the Government, consists in receiving the income of these places; in repairing, arranging, and supporting, even to the very minutest details, the worship of the temples and mosques; and, would that it could be blotted out of the page of history! that a Christian Government sends forth men, “ as pilgrim-hunters,” to find victims whose superstition shall be made the means of replenishing the coffers of the Company! Nor does it rest even here ; for not only does the paternal government of India afford its protection to hold its debased Hindu and Mussulman subjects in ignorance, but forces those who are the professors of a purer faith, in opposition to the dictates of an enlightened conscience and a sense of common decency, to be officially present at heathen and Mussulman festivals, and to fire salutes on the days held sacred by either sect, thus giving honour equally to Christ their divine Master, to the false prophet, and to Vishnu, &c.! This we believe is the nature of the connexion we seek to dissolve. Of its injurious tendency, we need scarcely say a word; it is “ of the earth earthy;" it can but continue to debase and enslave the miserable millions of Hindus and Mussulmans, and to inflict the severest pain on the upright Christian servants of the Government.

We are free to confess that that there is much difficulty in that part of the subject which affects endowments made by the sulijects of former Governments, and which were made over to the British at the time of their conquest of India, to be appropriated, in perpetuum, to the special purposes of the donors. The intentions of the dead should, if possible, be held sacred; but still, if the dead should even have bequeathed property for the upholding or extending of that, which after ages shall discover to be error, both in a philosophical, rational, and religious sense, surely a wise and paternal government is warrant. ed, in applying that property to purposes which would have comported with the donor's intentions, had he lived in an enlightened instead of an iron age. Nor are we without examples of this kind in the feelings and operations of governments ; nor should we be at a loss for support to such a mode of proceedure in some very recent movements of the Indian Government. There are legitimate means at hand to surmount these and all other difficulties. But, as it regards the dissolution of partnership between the other, idolatrous, departments and the Government, there can be no difficulty-no, not the shadow of one.

As it is not improbable our wishes in this matter may be misunderstood and misrepresented, it may be as well to state what it is we desire. We do not wish the government to move in a crusade against all temples and mosques, nor to throw their revenues into the sacred stream, nor divide their lands ainong its servants. This is not what we wish. All that we ask is, that the government should be in practice, what they boast they are in theory-neutral in matters of religion.

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