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105. Of the final cause or use of instincts

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CHAP. VI.-THE MALEVOLENT AFFECTIONS.

Page

151. Of the comparative rank of the affections

174

152. Of the complex nature of the affections

175

153. Of resentment or anger

176

154. Illustrations of instinctive resentment

155. Uses and moral character of instinctive resentment

. 177

156. Of voluntary in distinction from instinctive resentment

178

157. Tendency of anger lo excess, and the natural checks to it 179

158. Other reasons for checking and subduing the angry passions

159. Modifications of resentment. Peevishness.

. 182

160. Modifications of resentment. Envy

. 183

161. Modifications of resentment. Jealousy

162. Modifications of resentment. Revenge

185

163. Illustrations of the malevolent passions

185

164. Nature of the passion of fear

. 186

CHAP. VII.-THE BENEVOLENT AFFECTIONS.

165. Of the nature of love, or benevolence in general

188

166. Love, in its various forms, characterized by a twofold action . 189

167. Of the parental affection

168. Illustrations of the strength of the parental affection

191

169. Of the filial affection

170. The filial affection original or implanted

193

171. Illustrations of the filial affection .

194

172. Of the nature of the fraternal affection .

196

173. Of the utility of the domestic affections

197

174. Of the moral character of the domestic affections, and of the be-

nevolent affections generally

198

175. Of the moral character of the voluntary exercise of the benevolent

affections

199

176. Of the connexion between benevolence and rectitude

200

177. Of humanity, or the love of the human race

178. Further proofs in support of the doctrine of an innate humanity,

or love for the human race

203

179. Proofs of a humane or philanthropic principle from the existence

of benevolent institutions

205

180. Other remarks in proof of the same doctrine

207

181. Objection from the contests and wars among mankind

182. The objection, drawn from wars, furt considered

211

183. Illustration of the statements of the foregoing section

212

184. Of patriotism, or love of country

213

185. Of the affection of friendship

214

186. Of the affection of pity or sympathy

216

187. Of the moral character of pity

217

188. Of the affection of gratitude

218

CHAP. VIII.—THE BENEVOLENT AFFECTIONS.—LOVE TO THE SUPREME

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225

194. The absence of this principle attended with an excessive and sin.

ful action of other principles

226

195. Further illustrations of the results of the absence of this principle 228

196. Views of President Edwards on the subject of human depravity 230
the existence of right or rectitude in the things approved of 271
PART SECOND.

.

• 258

CHAP. I.-PROOFS OF A MORAL NATURE.
Section

Page

207. Reference to the general division

247

208. Proof of a moral nature from consciousness

248

209. Evidence of a moral nature discoverable in what we notice in

children

248

210. Proofs of a moral nature from the manner of our intercourse with

our fellow-men

250

211. Proofs of a moral nature from the terms used in different languages 251

212. Proofs from the operation of the passions of anger and gratitude 252

213. Prooss of a moral nature from feelings of remorse

253

214. Evidence of a moral nature from the ideas of merit and demerit,

reward and punishment

254

215. The existence of a moral nature involved in systems of moral phi.

losophy, and in other writings and treatises of a moral na-

ture

254

216. Proofs from the uniformity of law

255

217. Evidences of a moral nature even among Savage nations

218. Further remarks on the morality of Savage tribes

259

219. The existence of civil or political society implies a moral nature 260

220. A moral nature implied in the motives of human conduct which

are recognised in historical works

261

221. Evidence of a moral nature from Scripture

262

222. Concluding remarks on the general fact of a moral nature 263

Chap. II.—EMOTIONS OF MORAL APPROVAL AND DISAPPROVAL.

223. Classification of the moral sensibilities

264

224. Nature of the moral emotions of approval and disapproval · 265

225. Of the place or position, mentally considered, of the emotions of

approval and disapproval

266

226. Changes in the moral emotions take place in accordance with

changes in the antecedent perceptions

267

227. Of objects of moral approval and disapproval

268

228. Of the original ground or basis of moral approbation and disappro.

bation

269

229. Emotions of moral approval are called forth in connexion with

.

Page

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. 276

• 278

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CHAP. III.-RELATION OF REASONING TO THE MORAL NATURE.

Section

230. Of the doctrine which confounds reasoning and conscience 272

231. Of the close connexion between conscience and reasoning

273

232. Illustration of the preceding section

233. Further illustrations of the same subject

275

234. Remarks upon the case stated in the foregoing section

235. Of the training or education of the conscience

277

236. Of guilt when a person acts conscientiously,

237. Illustrations of the statements of the preceding section from the

case of the Apostle Paul

279

CHAP. IV.-NATURE OF MORAL BEAUTY.

238. Of the origin of emotions of moral beauty

280

239. Of the origin and import of the phrase, moral deformity

281

240. Of the correspondence between the degrees of moral beauty, and

the quickness or liveliness of the moral sensibilities 282

241. Or the perception of moral beauty considered as a source of hap-

283

242. Of the moral beauty of the character of the Supreme Being 284

Chap. V.-NATURE OF MORAL SUBLIMITY.

243. Remarks in explanation of the moral sublime

286

244. Instances and illustrations of the moral sublime

287

245. The moral sublime involves the morally beautiful

288

246. A degree of moral sublime in acts of strict and undeviating integ-

rity or justice

289

247. Other instances of the sublimity of justice

290

248. Instances of friendship and the parental affection illustrative of

the subject :

290

249. Of the moral sublimity of great benevolent undertakings

250. The spirit of forgiveness in some cases sublime .

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THE MORAL SENSIBILITIES OR CONSCIENCE.

MORAL OR CONSCIENTIOUS SENTIMENTS.

CLASS SECOND.

FEELINGS OF MORAL OBLIGATION.

CHAP. I.--EXISTENCE OF OBLIGATORY FEELINGS.

Section

Page

251. Feelings of moral obligation distinct from feelings of moral ap-

proval and disapproval

297

252. Proof of the existence of obligatory feelings from consciousness : 297

253. Further proof from the conduct of men

298

254. Further proof from language and literature

299

255. Further proof from the necessity of these feelings

300

CHAP. II.-NATURE OF OBLIGATORY FEELINGS.

256. Feelings of obligation simple, and not susceptible of definition 302

257. They are susceptible of different degrees

302

258. Of their authoritative and enforcing nature

209. Feelings of obligation differ from those of mere approval and dis-

approval

304

260. Feelings of obligation have particular reference to the future 305

• 303

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