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THE ALARUM CLOCK

1. A lady, who found it difficult to awake as early as she desired in the morning, purchased an alarum clock. This kind of clock is so contrived as to strike with a very loud whizzing noise at any time the owner pleases.

2. The lady placed the clock near the head of the bed, and at the appointed time she found herself fully aroused by the loud rattling sound. She immediately obeyed the summons, and felt the better all day for her early rising.

3. This continued for several weeks. The alarum clock faithfully performed its office, and was distinctly heard, so long as it was promptly obeyed. But, after a time, the lady grew tired of early rising, and, when awakened by the noisy monitor, merely turned herself, and slept again.

4. In a few days the clock ceased to arouse her from her slumber. It spoke just as loudly as ever, but she did not hear it, because she had acquired the habit of disobeying it.

5. Finding that she might just as well be without an alarum clock, she formed the wise resolution, that if she ever heard the sound again, she would jump up instantly, and she would never allow herself to disobey the friendly warnings.

6. Just so it is with conscience. If we obey its dictates, even to the most trifling particulars, we always hear its voice clear and strong. But if we allow ourselves to do what we fear is not quite right, we shall grow more and more sleepy, until the voice of conscience has no longer any power to awaken us.

purchased, bought. ceased, stopped. immediately, at once.

arouse, awake. summons, call.

slumber, sleep. promptly, instantly. conscience, the inward

monitor, reminder. monitor. a-la-rum whiz-zing faith-ful-ly re-so-lu-tion a-wake a-rous-ed o-bey-ed friend-ly de-sir-ed rat-tling a-wak-en-ed dic-tates con-triv-ed con-tin-u-ed ac-quir-ed par-tic-u-lars

What did the lady buy? When does it strike? Where did she place the clock? What did she do when she heard the alarum ? How long did she continue to do this? What did the lady do after a time? Why did she not hear the alarum ? What wise resolve did she make? How does conscience speak to us if we obey it? When does conscience lose its power over us?

ALI THE BOY CAMEL-DRIVER.

PART I.

1. Hassan was a camel-driver who dwelt at Gaza. It was his business to go with caravans backwards and forwards, across the desert to Suez to take care of the camels of travelling merchants. Hassan had a wife and one young son, called Ali.

2. Hassan had been absent for many weeks, when his wife received from him a message, brought by another camel-driver, who returned with a caravan from Suez. It said:-"Send the boy with the camel to Suez with the next caravan that starts from Gaza. I have some merchandise to bring home, and I will stop at Suez till he comes.”

3. Ali's mother prepared to obey the message. She grieved at the thought of sending her young son away to such a distance for the first time; but she said to herself that Ali was now quite old enough to be helping his father, and she immediately set about doing what was required for his journey. Ali got out the housings for the camel, and looked to the water-skins to see that they did not leak. His mother mended a rent in Ali's tunic, and bought him a new pair of slippers. She did all that was needed to make him quite ready the moment she knew that a caravan was about to start.

4. Ali was delighted to think that he was to go to his father, and that at last the day was come when he too was to be a camel-driver, and to take a journey with the dear old camel which he was so fond of. He had long wanted to ride on his back across the desert, and to lie down by his side when they rested at night. He had no fear.

5. The camel, which belonged to Hassan, and of which Ali was so fond, had been bought with the savings of many a year's hard work, and formed the sole riches of the family. It almost, indeed, caused Hassan to be looked upon as quite a rich man by the other camel-drivers, and Ali, besides having a great love for the animal itself, was proud of his father being a camel owner. He fed the camel every day himself, and though it was a great creature by the side of the young boy, yet it would obey the voice of Ali, and come and go at his bidding, and lie down and rise up just as he wanted. He called his camel by an Arabian word, which meant “Meek-eye."

6. At last there was a caravan about to start for Suez which Ali could join. The party of merchants

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met near the gates of the city, where there were some wells, at which the water-skins could be filled. Ali's mother attended, and bid her son a loving farewell.

7. The caravan started. The camels which were to lead the way had round their necks jingling bells, which the others hearing, followed without other guidance. Ali looked round and saw his mother standing on a mound near the city gate. He took his cap off and waved it round his head, and his another camel-driver, who returned with a caravan from Suez. It said:—“Send the boy with the camel to Suez with the next caravan that starts from Gaza. I have some merchandise to bring home, and I will stop at Suez till he comes.”

3. Ali's mother prepared to obey the message. She grieved at the thought of sending her young son away to such a distance for the first time; but she said to herself that Ali was now quite old enough to be helping his father, and she immediately set about doing what was required for his journey. Ali got out the housings for the camel, and looked to the water-skins to see that they did not leak.

His mother mended a rent in Ali's tunic, and bought him a new pair of slippers. She did all that was needed to make him quite ready the moment she knew that a caravan was about to start.

4. Ali was delighted to think that he was to go to his father, and that at last the day was come when he too was to be a camel-driver, and to take a journey with the dear old camel which he was so fond of. He had long wanted to ride on his back across the desert, and to lie down by his side when they rested at night. He had no fear.

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