Part the first. History of libraries

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Trübner & Company, 1859
 

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Tartalomjegyzék

CHAPTER V
57
The Herculaneum excavations
63
Sir Humphrey Davys experiments
71
Early Researches for MSS
74
Concurring testimonies during three Centuries of the want of Public
77
The main objects of the Monastic Life
83
The Monasteries of the Nitrian Desert
89
And of the Augustinians
95
And that of St Augustine
102
Literary treasures amassed at Whitby
109
Abbot Benedicts transcriptions for Peterborough
116
Catalogue opthe Library of the Benedictine Monastery op Christ
122
The Libraries of the German Flemish and Swiss Benedictines
236
Transfer of the remains of the Corvey Collection to Marburg
250
The Ueichenau Library
259
Labours and Sorrows of Abbot Tritheiiu at Spouhcim
265
Boccaccios Visit to Monte Cassiuo
271
Library at lomposia in the Eleventh Century
277
The taxtariff of Abbot Macarius
283
The founder of Clugni
291
Catalogue of the Library of St Kicjuier in the Ninth Century
297
Hiihard of Burys account of the Mendicant Booklovers
304
The Franciscan Library at Aunaberg
310
The Rules for delivery and return of books
316
Loans to Strangers
318
The Rules of the Scriptoria
325
Catalogue of the Rievaux Library
336
CHAPTER VII
342
The Controversy as to the cultivation of Jewish literature 341
348
Personal character of the Commissioners
355
John Lei ami s mission
362
The Library of Tonantius Ferreolus at his Castle of Prusiana
368
Surviving fragments ofjiis Library
371
Richard of Busys account of his method of Bookcollecting
377
Notices of varioussmall Collections bequeathed by Wills of the Four
384
That of Charles V of France and its subsequent dispersion
392
Cliarueter and extent of his Library
408

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Népszerű szakaszok

598. oldal - The King to Oxford sent his troop of horse, For Tories own no argument but force; With equal care to Cambridge books he sent, For Whigs allow no force but argument.
778. oldal - Ewart, to report on the best means of ' extending the establishment of libraries freely open to the public, especially in large towns, in Great Britain and Ireland.
342. oldal - To bud out fair, and her sweet smells throw all around. No tree, whose branches did not bravely spring ; No branch, whereon a fine bird did not sit; No bird, but did her shrill notes sweetly sing ; No song but did contain a lovely dit: Trees, branches, birds, and songs were framed fit, For to allure frail mind to careless ease.
3. oldal - ... the purest efficacy and extraction of that living intellect that bred them. I know they are as lively, and as vigorously productive, as those fabulous dragon's teeth; and being sown up and down, may chance to spring up armed men.
754. oldal - God, and the special food of man's soul, that all christian persons are bound to embrace, believe, and follow, if they look to be saved ; whereby they may the better know their duties to God, to their sovereign...
360. oldal - I know a merchantman, which shall at this time be nameless, that bought the contents of two noble Libraries for forty shillings' price: a shame it is to be spoken.
379. oldal - In that city are delightful libraries in cells redolent of aromatics ; there flourishing green-houses of all sorts of volumes ; there academic meads trembling with the earthquake of Athenian peripatetics pacing up and down ; there the promontories of Parnassus, and the porticos of the Stoics.
350. oldal - ... divers and great solemn monasteries of this realm wherein, thanks be to God, religion is right well kept and observed...
60. oldal - Read and wonder !" says the historian himself : and the solitary report of a stranger who wrote at the end of six hundred years on the confines of Media, is overbalanced by the silence of two annalists of a more early date, both Christians, both natives of Egypt, and the most ancient of whom, the patriarch Eutychius, has amply described the conquest of Alexandria.
60. oldal - Monophysite controversy were indeed consumed in the public baths, a philosopher may allow, with a smile, that it was ultimately devoted to the benefit of mankind. I sincerely regret the more valuable libraries which have been involved in the ruin of the Roman empire; but, when I seriously compute the lapse of ages, the waste of ignorance, and the calamities of war, our treasures, rather than our losses, are the object of my surprise.

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