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3. The flower should be double to the centre, high on the crown, round in the outline, and regular in the disposition of the petals.

4. The petals should be imbricated, and in distinct rows, whether they be reflexed, like some of the velvety Tuscan kind, or cupped like a ranunculus ; and the petals to the centre should continue the same form, and only be reduced in size.

5. The colour should be distinct and new, and stand fast against the sun and air, till the bloom fail.

6. The stem should be strong, the footstalk stiff and elastic; the blooms well out beyond the foliage, and not in each other's way.

The very worst habit a Rose can have, is that of throwing up several blooms close together, on short stiff footstalks, some of which must be cut away before the others can be fully developed ; as show-flowers they are bad, and as plants they are very untidy. The side buds prevent the centre flowers from opening circularly, and when the first beauty is off them, they exhibit dead Roses held fast between two living ones. As these show Roses may be found in almost every family, we must say nothing about the general character of a plant. We now proceed to other distinct families.

THE PROPERTIES OF NOISETTE ROSES. However singularly some catalogues class these Roses, we intend, by this name, to distinguish those Roses which bloom in clusters.

1. The petals should be thick, broad, and smooth at the edges.

2. The flower should be highly perfumed, or, as the dealers call it, fragrant.

3. The flower should be double to the centre, high on the crown, round in the outline, and regular in the disposition of the petals.

4. The cluster should be sufficiently open to enable all the flowers to bloom freely, and the stems and footstalk should be firm and elastic, to hold the flower face upward, or face outward, and not to hang down, and show the outside, instead of the inside of the blooms.

5. The bloom should be abundant at the end of every shoot.

6. The blooming shoots should not exceed twelve inches before they flower.

7. The bloom should stand out beyond the foliage, and the plant should be compact and bushy.

We now proceed to a family which we shall designate Climbing-roses, and which comprise blooms of the Noisette kind, that is, in bunches ; blooms which come singly, large and small ; flowers early and late ; and, in fact, which comprise all sorts of Roses that grow tall enough for training.

PROPERTIES OF CLIMBING ROSES. 1. The petals should be thick, broad, and smooth at the edges.

2. The flower should be highly perfumed, or, as the dealers call it, fragrant.

3. The flower should be double to the centre, high on the crown, round in the outline, and regular in the disposition of the petals.

4. The joints should be short from leaf to leaf. The blooms should come on very short branches, and all up the main shoots. The plant should be always growing and developing its flowers, from spring to autunın, and the foliage should completely hide all the stems, whether the plant be on front of a house or on any given device.

Having now travelled through the chief of the families which require separate notices of their properties, the first three properties numbered being required in all of them, we add, by way of a finish for all, except Mosses, that

The foliage should be bright green and shining, and, though not likely to be found in many varieties, it should be permanent, and constitute an evergreen.

By this we mainly establish a point in favour of an evergreen. We mention nothing about size, because size forms the distinction between many roses which have no other difference, and has little or nothing to do with the properties of the Rose.

THE PROPERTIES OF THE RANUNCULUS.

1. The flower should be of the form of twothirds of a ball, two inches in diameter, the under part of it square or horizontal.

2. The outline of the bloom should therefore form a perfect circle.

3. The petals should be thick, smooth on the edges and gently cupped ; they should lie close, so that very little but the edges should be seen, and that little only the inside surface.

4. The flower should be symmetrical to the centre, which should be close, so as to perfectly conceal the seed-vessel, even with the surface, and perfect so as to exhibit a complete finish to the surrounding petals.

5. The colour should be very dense, whatever be its hue; if an edged flower, the edging should be well defined, and the marking even and uniform in every petal ; in no case should the ground colour break through the edging, but spotted flowers with one spot on each petal are allowable.

6. The stem should be strong, perpendicular, and long enough to raise the flower clear six inches above the foliage, and no more, but this has reference to the plant, rather than to the flower.

7. Striped flowers are not perfect, nor are flowers speckled on the edges; the colour or edging of flowers, like those of edged picotees or tulips, ought not to exhibit a single break.

From what we have said, the reader will

observe that all thin petalled flowers, all those with serrated or notched edges, all those which are rough in the outline, flat or sunk in the centre, or confused in the laying of the petals, are faulty ; and in choosing from the stock while the flowers are in bloom, they are to be avoided. The real objection to thin petals is, that they do not preserve their form so well, nor remain in perfection so long, nor give the colour so dense. Shaded flowers are allowable, though stripes are not; but like the exhibitors. of picotees, the growers will retain the speckled edges, though they are decidedly inferior to those which possess the colour unbroken at the extreme edge. The true spotted varieties have only one spot on each petal, but the spot must be well defined. The rank in which these different classes of flowers stand, is—first, the edged ; second, the spotted ; third, the shaded ; fourth, the selfs. We do not place the broken edged or speckled in any rank at all.

PROPERTIES OF THE SWEETWILLIAM. With regard to the properties of a Sweetwilliam

1. The head of bloom should be large.

2. The individual flowers should be round, smooth on the edge, flat on the surface, thick in the petal, and the edges should touch each other. without lapping over,

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