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THE

SCOTTISH REVIEW. .

A QUARTERLY JOURNAL

OF

SOCIAL PROGRESS & GENERAL LITERATURE.

VOL. I.

GLASGOW:

SCOTTISH TEMPERANCE LEAGUE.

Office, 30 St Enoch Square.
EDINBURGH: JOHN DICKSON. MANCHESTER: W. BREMNER.
LONDN: HOULSTON AND STONEMAN; WM. TWEEDIE.
BELFAST: JOHN SHEPHERD.

1853.

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PREFACE.

TAE first volume of "THE SCOTTISH REVIEW' is placed in the hands of the British public.

Twelve months ago, when the importance of such an organ of “Social Progress and General Literature' was clearly apprehended, and its necessity and connection with the special interests of Temperance felt and avowed, it was scarcely deemed at all probable, by even the most sanguine, that a circulation of seven thousand should be attained on issuing the Fourth Number. One half the amount would have been regarded by not a few as a highly encouraging award of public favour; but so opportunely had the conception of a cheap Quarterly been entertained, and so happily had the subjects of Education, Sanitary Reform, and other social improvements been hit upon in their united bearing, that to their discussion on the pages of this journal the public have at once responded, and crowned the enterprise with a very obvious approval.

"THE SCOTTISH REVIEW' was based on the principle that the friends of social advancement, whether seeking that advancement through the medium of physical, intellectual, moral, or other personal and social reforms, were really one in the object aimed at, however diversified the instruments employed. Consequently it was believed that no real antagonism could ever arise in pursuing their common end—each in the use of their own appropriate means. The removal or mitigation of intemperance, the removal or mitigation of ignorance ainong large masses of the people, the improvement of their dwellings, the drainage of their towns and cities, the admission of more air, more water, more light,-these, and other like objects bearing on the wellbeing of the state, could never, it was believed, if fairly looked at, be regarded otherwise than as mutual helps in the attainment of our common weal. So the originators of this periodical thought, and so they acted in giving it form and pressure.' And hence on the pages of "THE SCOTTISH REVIEW' will be found contri

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