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JOHNSON, his proposed tour to Italy for his health, iv. 350, 359.
........ progress of his dissolution, iv. 430, to the end.
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........ his will and codicil, iv. 438, 439, 442, 441.-Remarks

On them, iv. 441, 442, 443.
...... his burning his MSS. iv. 442.
...... his MS. account of his own life, iv. 443, 444.

.... his death, iv. 455.
...... his funeral, iv. 457.

.... his monuments and epitaphs, iv. 457, 461, 462.

His Character and Manners.
........ bis peculiarities of person and manners i. 18, 69, 74,

121, 122, 123, 222, 225, 375, 462 ; ii. 343, 421 ; ii. 69,
385; iv. 196.
.... his attention to small things, i. 444 ; ii. 316; iv.

348.
........ his candour, i. 384 ; iv. 205, 206.

increased as he advanced in life, iv. 253.
........ not a complainer, iv. 121, 184, 379; seldom courted

others, jïi. 339.
........ not prone to inveigh against his own times, iii. 4, 246,
....... a great observer of characters, iii. 20.

...... never courted the great, iv. 121.
....... never got entirely rid of his provincial pronunciation,

ii. 162, 483.
........ by what means he attained his extraordinary accuracy and

flow of language, i. 180.
........ his visit to his native town, where he finds things altered,

i. 351
.... his library, i. 414.
.. his love for the acquaintance of young persons, i. 423.

his observance of certain days, i. 461.

his custom of talking to himself, i. 462.
.. his watch-inscription, ii. 58.

... his amusements in his solitary hours, iii. 428.
...... his company sought by few of the Great, iv. 121.
...... general traits of his character and mode of living, i. 40,
67, 79, 378, 439; ii. 13, 116, 144, 171, 300, 312; iii. 7.
100, 177, 207, 334, 357 ; iv. 12, 20, 58, 116, 197, 249,
326.

his course of study desultory and irregular, i. 408.
bis instructions for study, iii. 210, 211.
his early acquisition of general knowledge, i. 424.

.......
......

JOHNSON, his manner of composing his Poetical Works, ii. 13.

..... his · Rambler,' iii. 41.
........ his censure of one of his ? Ramblers,' iv. 4.
........ at a late period of life could have made his · Ramblers

better, iv. 333.
........ his manner of composing his other works, iii. 62, the
........ never looked at his · Rasselas' since it was first pub-

lished, iv. 124.
........ wrote six sheets of translation from the French in one

day, iv. 171.
........ wrote a hundred lines of the Vanity of Wishes in a day,

ii. 13.
....... wrote seventy lines of the Vanity of Human Wishes

in a day, without putting one of them on paper, till all was

finished, i. 168.
..... wrote three columns of the Gentleman's Magazine,

containing Parliamentary Debates, in an hour, iv. +47.
........ wrote forty-eight of the printed octavo pages of the

Life of Savage at a sitting, i. 145.
........ his style formed on Sir William Temple's, a paper of

Ephraim Chambers respecting the second edition of his
Dictionary, and Sir Thomas Browne, i. 197, 199; iii.

279, n.
........ his own remarks on, and masterly vindication of his

style, iii. 189, 19).
........ his extraordinary memory, i. 16, 24.
...... retained in it verses of obscure authours, ii. 132 ; iv.

108 ; N.

.... his superlative power of wit, ï. 237.
........ his dexterity in retort, i. 372; iv. 198.

his conversation eminently distinguished by fecundity of
fancy, and choice of language, iii. 342.

nothing of the old man in it, iii. 363; iv. 197.
....... his early, long, habitual, and systematick piety, i. 15, 43,

226, 460, 465; ii. 24, 45, 67, 108, 144, 192, 218, 30), 368,
371; iji. 91, 100, 101, 102, 268, 337, 409, 431; iv. 6, 293,
309, 400, 433, 448, 454.

.... his indepencence, i. 421.
....... his superstition, i. 462; ii. 495.
..... his awful fear of death, ii. 88, 103, 123, 312; iii. 86,

168, 319 ; iv. 290, 300, 321.

JOHNSON, his general tenderness of nature, humanity, and affa.

bility, i. 56, 212, 237, 252, 265, 274,388, 396, 428; ii. 33,
45, 67, 106, 292, 316, 37, 482; iii. 81, 82, 139, 149, 200,
201, 243, 331 ; iv. 128, 141, 193, 200, 291, 303, 344, 367,

428.
....... his warm and sometimes violent manner, i. 221 ; ïi. 77,

103, 121; iii. 23, 201, 295, 314, 340, 364, 372, 413; iv.

116, 184, 294. 357.
........ his placability, ii. 106 ; iii. 295.

...... his charity, ii, 118.
........ his occasional jocularity, i. 178, 248, 377, 406; ii. 76,

95, 270, 374, 389, 473, 485; iii. 167, 174, 410; iv. 26,
86.
..... his invariable regard to truth, i. 128, 229, 333,415, ii.

251, 450 ; iii. 249, 264, 317 ; iv. 49, 328.
........ his love of little children, iv. 208.
........ his kindness to his servants, iii. 95; iv. 208.

..... his fondness for animals which he had taken under his

protection, iv. 208.

.... his bow to an Archbishop, iv. 209.
....... his laugh, ii. 389.
...... his engaging to write the history of the Authour's family,

209, 210.
........ his respect to birth and family, i. 115, 117, 126,426 ;

ii. 155, 181, 269, 341 ; iii. 381; iv. 168.
........ his love of good eating, i. 445; iii 70, 203, 309; iv.

306.
......... his political character and opinions, i. 16, 287, 403,

410; ii. 61, 115, 121), 125, 161, 173, 199, 225, 331, 332,
364, 365, 380; iii. 4, 44, 170, 223, 306, 339, 351, 384 ;

iv. 87, 122, 149, 178.
...... his pamphlets, i. 119, 120; ü, 108, 109, 135, 136,

149, 296, 328, 329, 330.

For his other works see their different titles, and see iv. 447.
......... his general character summed up by the Authour, ir.

463.

... catalogue of his works, i. xxvii.
c......, catalogue of works proposed to be executed by him, iv.

413, 414, 415, 416, &c. See iv. 249, 448.
........ stories to his prejudice refuted, iii. 212; iv, 180, 181.

See Hawkins and Piozzi.
........ various portraits of him, iv, 459, 460.

* Johnsoniana, the collection so called, ii. 453.
Johnston, Sir James, iv. 302.
Jones, Miss, i. 299.
...... Sir William, ii. 125; iii: 415.
Jorden, Mr. i. 37, 38.
Journal, or diary of life, its utility, i. 312, 412; ii. 224, 369;

iii. 187, 237, 248, 282; iv. 189.
Ireland, and the Irish, i. 297, 298; ii. 247, 321 ; iii. 440.
Irishmen mix better with English than the Scots do, ii. 247.
Irish clergy, considerable scholars among them, ii. 132.
.... their disregard of quantity, ii. 132.
• Irene,' Johnson's tragedy of, i. 77, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88,

129, 130.
...... acted, i. 173, 174, 175, 176, 177..
Islam, a description of, iii. 204.
Judges, ii. 355, 356.
Junius, ii. 136 ; iii. 405; iv. 328. .
Juries, iii. 15, 16.
Justitia hulk, an inadequate punishment, iii. 290.

K.

K ought to be retained in the words publick, musick, critick, &c.

iv. 31.
Kames, Lord, ii. 206.
...... his · Elenients of Criticism,' ii. 86.
...... his "Sketches of the History of Man, iii. 268, 367, 368,

380.
Kelly, Hugh, Johnson's prologue to his Word to the Wise,' iii.

121.
.... curious anecdote of, i. 446. .
Kemble, J. P. Esq. iv. 257.
Kempis, Thomas à, iii. 247 ; iv. 21, 299.
Ken, Bishop, iii. 184, n. .
Kennedy, Rev. Dr. his, Astronomical Chronology,' i. 316.
........ M. D. A singular Tragedy by, iii. 259.
Kennicot, Mrs. iv. 306, 309.
........ Rev. Dr., ii. 127.
Kenrick, Dr., i. 476 ; ii. 62.
Killaloe, Bishop of. See Barnard.
Killingley, Mrs. her curious address to the Author, iii, 225.
VOL. IV,

KK

Kindness, actual, always in our power, through fondness not, ip.

176.
King, Rev. Dr. of St. Mary Hall, i. 257, 260, 328.
.... (dissenting Minister,) iii. 313.
King Charles I. II. James II. George I. II. III. and William IJI.

see their respective initials.
Kings, their situations, i. 403, 420; ii. 173, 381.
Kippis, Dr., iii. 191.
Kneller, Sir Godfry, anecdote of, jii. 257.
Knowledge, ii. 174, 192, 225, 372,382 ; iii. 35 ; iv. 231,
.......... the desire of, natural to man, i. 434.
.......... however minute or inconsiderable, of some value, i

369, 468.
Knowles, Mrs., jïi. 308, 322, 323.
Knox, Mr. the traveller, ii. 317.
...... Rev. Vicessimus, iv. 352.
...... his imitation of Johnson's style, iv. 426.

Landlords and tenants, ii. 97 ; iii. 270 ; iv. 177.
Langton, Bennet, Esq., i. 221, 296, 307, 312,414 ; ii. 192 ; iit-

282, 388, 389; iv. 444.
..... Johnson's high praise of his moral character, iii. 176 ; iv.

301.
.... Johnson's letters to, i. 267, 301, 312, 313, 335; ii. 14,

16, 47, 136, 148, 291, 372 ; iii. 133, 393; iv. 255, 285, 376,

389.

his Johnsoniana,' iv. 1-33,
...... Miss Jane, Johnson's letter to, iv. 292.
...... Peregrine, Esq. account of his admirable and genteel

economy, ii. 16, 17, 18.
Languages, i. 454 ; ii. 30, 79, 159, 193; iii. 256; iv. 338, 339.
Landsdown, Marquis of, i. 296 ; iv. 204.
Latin, Jobnson's accurate knowledge of, ii. 421.
...... poetry, modern, ii. 382.
La Trobe, Rev. Mr., iv. 449.
Lauder, William, his forgery against Milton, i. 207, 208, &c.
Laughter, the various modes of, indicate what kind of company

the laugher has kept, i. 427.
Laughers, the, the use of sometimes living with them, iv. 196.
Law, Johnson's intention of studying, i. 468.

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