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Some verbs ending in t and d are the same in the present and preterimperfect tense, and in the passive participle; as, cast, cost, hit, read, Tent, &c.

& First of your kind! society divine !

Still visit thus my nights, for you reserv'd,
And mount my soaring soul to thoughts like your's ;
Silence, thou lonely pow'r, the door be thine ;
See on the hallow'd hour that none intrude,
Save a few chosen friends, who sometimes deign
To bless my humble roof, with sense refin'd,
Learning digested well, exalted faith,
Unstudy'd wit, and humour ever gay."

THOMSON,

SECTION VII.

OF AN ADVERB.

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“ A very

AN

N ADVERB is a part of speech joined to a verb,

adjective, &c. to restrain and qualify their signification; as, “ He reads distinctly,' . fine house," &c.

Adverbs are variously denominated, according to their various significations; as, of order, time, place, distance, motion, quantity, quality, &c.

Some adverbs are compared; as, often, oftener, oftenest ; soon, sooner, soonest; well, better, bèst'; happily, more happy, most happily,

Many words are used both as adjectives and adverbs; as, mone, most; little, less, least';, weekly, monthly, yearly, &c.

Substan

Substantives are sometimes used as adverbs; as, yesterday, to-day, to-morrow.

In poetry, adjectives are very frequently used for adverbs; as,

« The vineyard swells, refulgent on the day,

Spreads o'er the vale, or up the mountain climbs
Profuse, and drinks amid the sunny rocks,
From cliff to cliff increas'd, the heighten'd blaze,
Low bend the weighty boughs; the clusters clear
Half through the foliage seen, or ardent Aame,
Or shine transparent, while perfection breathes -
White o'er the turgent film the living dew.”

THOMSON,

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SECTION VIII.

OF A CONJUNCTION.

A
CONJUNCTION is a part of speech, which is used

to join words or sentences together. Of conjunctions, some are copulative and some disjunctive.

A conjunction copulative joins sentences together, and denotes a continuation of the sense; as, He is a good man, and a scholar.”

A conjunction disjunctive connects and continues the sentence; but denotes more or less, an opposition in the sense; as, “ I went, but did not succeed.”

“ Nor would the Nile more watry stores contain,

But that he ftagnates on the Lybian plain;
Nor would the Danube run with greater force,
But that he gathers in his tedious course
Ten thousand streams; and swelling as he goes,
In Scythian scas the glut of rivers throws."

ROWE.
SECTION

SECTION IX.

OF A PREPOSITION.

PREPOS
REPOSITIONS are usually placed before the

words to which they relate, and are used to shew the relation betwixt one word and another.

Those relations, which in some languages are signified by cases, or different terminations of the substantive, adjective, or pronoun, are, in English, expressed by prepositions.

Prepositions are very often prefixed to verbs, and considered as a part of them; as, outrun, overcome, undergo.

Such prepositions as are used in composition only, are called inseparable prepositions ; as, a, be, con, mis, un, &c. abide, bestride, conjoin, mistake, undo.

" For him alone, Hope leads from goal to goal,

And opens still, and npens on his soul?
'Till lengthen'd on to Faith, and unconfin'd,
It pours the bliss that fills up all the mind.
He sees why nature plants in man alone
Hope of known bliss, and Faith in bliss unknown:
(Nature, whose dictates to no other kind
Are given in vain, but what they seek they find)
Wise in her present; the connects in this
His greatest virtue with his greatest bliss ;
At once his own bright prospect to be blest,
And strongest motive to assist the rest."

Pope.

SECTION

SECTION X.

OF AN INTERJECTION.

A
N INTERJECTION, thrown in between the

parts of a sentence, is expressive of some affection, or passion of the mind; as, ah! alas! phy! foh! « Oh thou! whatever tiile please thine ear, Dean, Draper, Bickerstaff, or Gulliver !"

Pope. " By charms like thine, which all my soul have won, Who might not-- ah! who would not be undone ?"

IBID: “Alas how chang'd!. what sudden horrors rise !”

IBID.

SYNTAX:

OR THE

THIRD PART OF GRAMMAR.

SHIT

YNTAX, or construction, is the proper dispo

sition of words in a sentence. Syntax is usually divided into two parts ;concord and regimen.

Concord is the agreement of one word with another, in number, case, gender, or person.

Regimen, or government, is when one word requires another to be put in some particular case or mood.

There are some necessary Rules in English Syntax which cannot properly be arranged, under either of these divisions.

SECTION

SECTION I.

RULES OF CONCORD.

THE

'HÉ verb

agrees

with its nominative case in number and person; as, “ I love, thou lovest, he loves; we love, ye love, they love." • Meantime in shades of night Æneas lies;

Care seiz'd his soul, and sleep for sook his eyes.
But when the sun restor'd the chearful day,
He rose, the coast and country to survey,
Anxious and eager to discover more :
It look'd a wild uncul:ivated shore.
But whether human kind, or beasts alone
Possess'd the new-found region was unknown.”

DRYDEN,

Two or more nominatives singular, with a conjunction copulative betwixt them, will have a verb plural; as,

Homer, Virgil, and Milton were great poets.

I and you are reading Corderius. « Despair and rage and love divide her beart; Despair and rage had some, but love the greater part.”

IBID. A noun of multitude singular may agree with the verb either in the singular or plural number; as,

“ The flock feed, or feeds. The fleet sail, or sails.** The Tyrian train admitted to the ast, Approach, and on the painted couches rest."

IBID.

" The

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