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Memoirs of the late Mr. Peter Coilinson, Some singular Adventures of the itinerant

Fellow of the Royal Sociery, and of the Preacher

33

Society of Antiquaries in London, and of A Criticism of Matthew xxiij. 23. 34

the Royal Societies of Berlin and Uplal 3 Dr. Zubly's Address to Lord Dartmouth on

A necdote of King George I.

6

The American Contest and its Eficis 35

Anecdote of a King's Friend

ib. Genuine Anecdotes of an Ancestor of the

Parliamentary History on a new and impro-

Duke of Leeds

39

ved Pian

7

Dcfcription of the Counties of Stirling and

Debates in the House of Lords

15

Clackmannan

Anecdote of the Prime Minister of Portu- Maihematical Correspondence

gal

16 Imparial Review of new Publications

A Fragment from Sterne, after the Minner Barry's Observations on the Wines of the

of Rabelais

17

Ancients

ib,

Exhibition of some modern Sermonizers is Hints to Gentlemen of landed Property 44

Passages of a true Story

19

The Law of Liberty, a Sermon

45

Afiecting Story of Flavian, Maria, and Roc On illicit Love, written among the Ruins of

meo

Godstow Nunnery

ibid.

On the Intinct which actuates Brutes

Adventures of Alonzo

46

Curius Account of one Dr, Simon Formanib, An Heroic Epistle to Lord Craven ibid.

Forman's strange but true Astronomical Pro. Lift of New Books

47

gnostications

23

The British Theatre

ibid.

A Quixote Scheme for subjecting the Criiqne on the Duenna, Silent Woman,

Mats

and the Discovery

48

Explanation of Berkeley's Do&trine of POETICAL ESSAYS

ibid.

Ideas

25

In Praise of good Liquor

ibid.

Dec'arations of the American Congress, in Monthly Chronologer

53

Answer to the late Royal Proclamation 26 Account of the Execution of the two Pere

Lords Protest against the last American Bill2 8

reaus, &c.

ibid.

Memoirs of a Lay Preacher

31 L'articulars of the Damages done by the lare

Specimen of the Lay Preacher's Abilieies 32 Fail of Snow, &c.

55

With the following Embellishmenis, viz.

An eleganc Engraving of the late Mr. PESEX COLLINSON, F. R. S. and A. S.

ANO

A Map of the Counties of STIRLING and CLACKMANNIN.

LONDON, printed iur R. BALDWIN, 4 No. 47, in pdier-nofter-Row.

Of whom may be had complete Sers, from the Year 1732 to the present Time, ready bouri

and stitched, or any fing? Volume to cornplete Sets.

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Bank cock. 141

Inda Stock

Ann.

PRICES of STOCKS, &c. in JANUARY, 1776. Sou. Sea.jOld S. S.New S. S., 3 per C. , 3 per C. , 3 per C. / 3 per C.13 per C.B. 4: P. C3 {B. \Lo, An. In. B. NavyB | Lottery Stock Ann. reduced consols In Ann. B. 1726.

Prem. Difc. 1751

Tick.

Conf. 1758
87
.81

89
87

63

1 81

60 92

881

89

Wind Weath,
Deal London

S
SW
SW
WSW

Fair
Rain

87

88 1

18 19

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Snow

154

SW

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79

60

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88 I 88 89 89 $

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AVERAGE PRICES of GRAIN, by the Standard WINCNESTER Bushel. Wheat. | Rye. Barley, | Oats. (Beans,

Wheat. Rye. Barley | Oats.

Beans.

Wheat Rye. Barley: Oats. ¡Beans, d. s. d. s. d. s. d.

s. d. s. d. s. d. s. d.

s. d. d. s. d. 4 9 3 4 3 3

3 7 North Wales 5 9

4 10

8
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4 3
Scotland 4 2 6

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South Wales 57

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LIBRARY

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THE

LONDON MAGAZINE,

FOR JANUARY, 1776.

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For the LONDON MA GA Z IN E.
MEMOIRS of the late Mr. Peter COLLINSON, Fellow of the Royal Society,

and of the Society of Antiquaries in London, and of the Royal Societies of Berlin
and Upfal.

(WITH AN ELEGANT ENGRAVING:) HE satisfaction ari- the number of fuch kept increasing

sing from the view of to the last period of his life. T

a life continually em- The first rate naturalists of the ployed in commenda- age, Drs. Derham, Woodward, Dale, ble pursuits, and in Lloyd, Sir Charles Wager, and Sir acts of laiting and ex- Hans Sloane, were among his friends

tensive utility, is not a -He was one of those few who vi. (mail one.

We participate afresh in fited Sir Hans at all times familiarly, every social action of the friend whom and continued fo to do to the lateft we loved whilft living, and pay that periodand among the great variety of tribute to his name which love and articles which formed his friend's sufriendship demand-a grateful and perb collection, fmall was the numhonourable remembrance.

ber of those, with whose history Mr. The just elteem which Mr. Peter Collinson was not well acquainted. He Collinson had acquired, among the was elected a fellow of the Royal chief promoters of natural history in Society, December 12, 1728, and was most parts of the world, and among one of the most diligent and useful men of understanding in general, in members of that respectable body, not every part of useful science ; must only in fupplying them with many render any apology unnecessary for curious obfervations himself, but in exhibiting some account of him. promoting and preserving an exten

Mr. Peter Collinson was the great. sive correspondence with learned fo. grandson of Peter Collinson, who lived reigners in all countries, and on on bis paternal estate called Hugal every useful subject - and thus ex. Hall, near Winderinere Lake, ten cited others to contribute largely to miles from Kendal in Weltmoreland, the instruction and entertainment of He was born in the year 1693, and the fociety. whilft a youth he discovered a strong Indeed he suffered nothing useful attachment to natural history. Insects, in either art or science to escape him. and their several metamorphoses, em- - There were but few men of learnployed many of those lours, which at ing and ingenuity of all professions his time of life are mostly spent by who were not of his acquaintance-he others in very diferent pursuits. acquainted the learned and ingenious Plants likewise engaged his attention; in dittant parts of the globe with the he began early to make a collection discoveries and improvements in naof dried specimens, and had access to tural bistory in this country, and rethe best gardens in the neighbourhood ceived the like information from the of London. In the year 1740 he inoft eminent persons in almost every was considered among those who other. His correspondence with Cadwere best acquainted with botany wallader Colden, Efq;, of New York, and natural history in England and the celebrated Dr. Franklin of his collection was very large - the Philadelphia, furnith many instances specimens well chofen-lisbotanic of the benefit resulting from his atgarden contained many curious plants tention to all improvements. To him not to be met with in any other, and Dr. Franklin communicated his first

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essays

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