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PAGE MODERN PHYSICISTS AND THE ORIGIN OF Man. By George Dering

Wolf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 The hostility of modern physicists to Christianity, 126; Their method of investigation, 127; Uncertainty of scientific conclusions, 128; Prof. Tyndall on the supernatural, 130, And on religion, 132: Professor Tyndall's theories, 133-135 ; His admissions, 136; Researches of Father Thebaud, 139; Iwo propositions explained and proved, 140; The primitive condition of man, 143; His primeval barbarism disproved, 144; The dispersion of mankind, 146.

THE CATHOLIC CHURCH IN AMERICAN HISTORY. By John Gilmary Shea, . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . 148 Catholics the first explorers of America, 149; The Spaniards in Florida, 149; The French in Canada, 150; The missionary journeys, 150; Catbolics in Maryland, 150; And in the other colonies, 151-153; France in the valley of the Ohio, 153, The English conquer Canada, 153; American Catholics and the revolutionary struggle, 154; The Catholics in 1783, 155; Bishop Carroll, 156 ; A half century of progress, 157; Anti-Catholic agitation, 158; State proselytism, 159; The education question, 159; The Public School Society, 160; The Bible question, 161; The German emigration, 161: The Native American Party, 161: The Philadelphia riots of 1844,162: Religious orders in America, 163, Catholics in office, 163; Catholic authors, 164; The Indian Missions, 165, 166; Catholics and the civil war, 167: Results of the war, 168: President Grant and the proposed amendment, 168, 169; Present position and strength of the Catholic Church in America, 170; Examples of virtue and sanctity, 172; The Church's inherent vitality, 173; Her future in Ainerica, 173.

ACTUAL SITUATION OF THE CHURCH. By Rev. Aug. J. Thebaud, S.J., 193

The mission of the Church, 194; A beautiful symbol, 194; The formation of Christendom, 195; The position of the Popes, 197; The idea of the Church, 198, 199; The great teacher, 200, The judge of men and institutions, 202; The great tribunal, 204; Feudalism and war, 206; The Church the avenger and consoler, 207; The Church and the poor, 210; The principles of Wycliffe, 212-215; Their spread, 216-218: Applied in modern times, 219; Attack on the Papal States, 220: Napoleon III and Victor Emmanual, 221-224; Garibaldi in Italy, 225; The canonization of Japanese Martyrs, 225; The entry of the Italians into Rome, 227; The unity of Italy, 229; Italy and the Pope, 230.

SHALL WE HAVE A UNIVERSITY? By Right Rev. T. A. Becker, D.D., . 230

The necessity of improving the higher education, 230: Position of Catholics in re-
gard to education, 231; Catholic Colleges, 233; Need of a Catholic University, 235 :
Increase in the number of Catbolics, 257; Their educational wants, 238; Advantagog
of a University, 239; Dr. Newman's opinion, 241; Action of the Council of Balti-
more, 242; Feasibility of establishing a University, 244; Examples from the past.
245: It is a work of time, 246; Qualifications of the Professors, 247; and of the
students, 250; The difficulties not insuperable, 252.

THE INQUISITION. J. G. S.,. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254

The question of religious coercion, 254; The ancient belief, 255; The modern theory, 255; The Albigenses, 258; Foundation of the Inquisition, 259; The Inquisition and the Jews, 261; Protestant intolerance, 262; The Spanish Inquisition, 263; Llorente's account. 265 : The Jews in Spain, 266; The Moors, 267; The terrible ravages of the reformers, 268; The Inquisition checks them, 268; It becomes a state engine, 268; Apd persecutes the Jesuits, 269; Method of the Inquisition, 270; Autos de Fe, 271 The numbers who perished, 272; Severity of penal codes, 273; Protestant misrepresentations, 275; Catholic writers, 276.

SECULAR EDUCATION IN ENGLAND AND THE UNITED States. By T.

W. M. Marshall, LL.D., . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278

Teaching an essential function of the Church, 278: The project of secular education. 279: The secularist and the sectary, 280; Excellence of Catholic schools, 281; Protestant testimony, 282-285; The attacks of modern science, 286, 287; Authority, the defence of mental freedom, 288; The proposed divorce of religion and education, 289; Education no preventive of crime, 290; The so-called religious difference in education, 291; State education in France, 292; In Germany, 293; The condition of religion in Germany, 294-296; And of Russia, 296-298: The American common scbools, 298; Testimony as to their effects, 299; Dr. Edson, 300; M. Tremen heere. 301 : Mr. Mann, 302; Evils of secularism, 303, 304; Advantages of Catholic education. 305; President Grant's speech, 307; A question, 309; The Church and the world, 310, A beautiful vision, 311.

RAMBLES IN THE Rocky MOUNTAINS. By General John Gibbon, U.S.A., 312

The discoveries of Captains Lewis and Clarke, 312: The valley of the Yellowstone.
313: A journey up the valley, 314; The beauties of the valley, 316; The terraces
and the cap of liberty, 318; The hot springs, 319; Their wonders, 321; The frozen
cascade, 322; The "bee-hive," 325; Down the valley, 327; difficulties of western
travel, 328; Falls of Gardner's River, 330; A bridge on the Yellowstone, 331; A
magnificent view, 333; A mud volcano, 335.

PAGE MIRACULOUS POWERS IN THE TRUE CHURCH. By Very Rev. James A.

Corcoran, D.D., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 337 Miracles and prayer, 337; The prayer test, 338; Mr. Buckley on miracles, 340; The Purpose of miracles, 341; Miracles under the old law, 342; Their object and purpose various, 344; The conversion of Europe, 346; Miracles wrought in its conversion, 347; Miracles may still be performed, 348 ; But the reformers wrought none, 350; Nor protestant missionaries, 351; Wesley on Miracles, 352.

GENERAL BANKS AS A HISTORIAN. By M. F. S.,. . . . . . . . 353

The position of General Banks, 353; His statements on the elective principle, 354; Political principles in the Old Testament, 354 ; No democracy among the Jews, 355 ; Nor among their neighbors, 357; Assyrian government, 358; Government of Persia, 361; and of India and China, 362; The Grecian states, 363; Mr. Gladstone on Homer, 365: Character of the Greek Republics, 368: Researches into chronology, 370; General Banks on the Pope and King Pepin, 370 ; Parke Godwin and Gibbon on this case, 371; The facts of the case, 373; The Church and the equality of man, 374; The Church and governments, 375.

THE ITALIAN OCCUPATION OF THE CITY OF ROME. By Rev. Henry Formby, .

. . .

. . . . . . . . . . . 385 The manner in which Christ identified himself with the world, 386; The consequences of this, 387; The position of the old Roman Empire in history, 388, 389; And of the city of Rome, 390 ; The occupation of the city of Rome by the Italians, 392; The apatby with which this is regarded, 393; And the reason for it, 396-399: The history of Rome as viewed by Protestants, 399-401 : The Catholic significance of Roman history, 401; Babel as the centre of revolt, 401; Is destroyed, 401; Rome as the centre of faith and truth, 402; Our duty to rebuild the walls of Jerusalem, 403.

CATHOLIC INDIANS IN MICHIGAN AND WISConsin. By Very Rev.

Edward Jacker, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 404 The permanence of the Jesuit missions, 405; The Indians on Lake Huron in 1660, 407 : The tribes and their numbers, 408-410: Dacotas, Ojibwas, and Ottawas, 410-412; The French missionaries, 413; Their travels and sufferings, 414; Fathers Medard and Bruga, 414, 415; Father Claude Alloez, 416; His journeys, 417-419; Father James Marquette, 419; Mission of La Pointe, 421: Father Druillettes, 423; Jesuits at Sault St. Marie, 425; Green Bay mission, 425; The Isle of Mackinaw, 427; Bishop Fenwick's visit, 432; Modern Algonquin mission, 435.

THE ORIGIN OF IDEAS. By Rev. Walter H. Hill, S.J.,

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Theories on the origin of ideas, 436 ; Statement of the question, 438 ; The scholastic
method the most reasonable, 439; Illustrated by their theory of vision, 440-445; The
action of the intellect iu apprehending, 445-447; An objection stated and answered,
447 : The real difficulty of philosophical inquiries, 448; Theories to explain this, 448 ;
The scholastic theory, 449; Proofs that this theory is true, 451-453; The present
state of the question, 454.

RAMBLES IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS. By General John Gibbon, U. S. A., 455

En route for the falls, 455; its branches, 456; Mud geysers, 459 ; An eruption, 461;
Secondary shores, 462: A group of hot springs, 463: Their peculiarities, 465, 466;
Lake Madison, 467: Upper geyser basin, 468: The National Park, 471; Amagnificent
spectacle, 473; Sketch of the discovery of the Yellowstone region, 474.

TAE DIVINITY OF Christ. By Right Rev. P. N. Lynch, D.D., ... 475

Christianity the greatest of facts, 475; Christ its central point, 476; The upity and
unchangeableness of the Church, 477 ; Changes in modes of speech, 478; The teach-
ing of the Apostles respecting Christ's divinity, 481 ; Their accounts of Him, 482;
And of His death, 485; St. John's gospel, 486: The Word of God," 487; Meaning of
the phrase in literature and philosophy, 487-492; St. John's statements analyzed,
492-495: Passages in the Epistles explained, 495-500; The meaning of the word
figure, 501; A survey of the whole argument, 503.

THE CHURCH AND THE INTELLECTUAL WORLD. By Rev. Aug. J. The

baud, S.J., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 504 Modern intellectualism. 504; Terms offered to the Church, 505; The Church as an intellectual body, 506; The Augustan age, 508: The new ecclesiastical literature, 508 ; The school of Alexandria, 510; Origen, 511; The Greek fathers, 512; The Scriptures, 513: The Latin writers, 514: Syriac, 515; Armenia, 516; The Church as the creator and guide of nations, 517; Influence of the clergy, 518; The Church and the Christian people, 519; The formation of languages, 520; Universities founded, 522; Europe in the 18th century, 523: Effects of the Reformation, 524; Freemasonry, 526;

urch and education, 529; Education in France, 629-531; The modern conflict, 532; Resources of the Church, 535; A hopeful prospect, 537.

PAGE HOMERIC TROY: Its SITE AND REMAINS. By Prof. F. A. Paley, . . 539

Discoveries of Dr. Schliemann, 539; The site of Troy, 539; Is Hissarlik the site of
Homer's Troy? 541; Difficulties of ibis theory, 543; Was Troy a real city ? 546-548;
The curious balle of clay, 649; What they are, 550; Dr. Schliemann's conjectures,
651, 552; The rude art of Hissarlik, 553; Dr. Schliemann has proved nothing, 555;
Mr. Gladstone's opinion, 557; The historic character of the Iliad an open question,

559. IN MEMORIAM: ORESTES A. BROWNSON. By The Editor, . . . . . 560 THE CHURCH AND THE PEOPLE. By Rev. Aug. Thebaud, S.J.,. . . . 577

The Church and the people, 577; Love of the people for the Church, 579; The causes
of the alienation of the working classes in France, 583: Evils of the medieval period,
584; Feudalism and want of comfort, 586; Slanders on the monks, 589; Nature of
civilization, 591: Principles of the middle ages on politics, 592; Its social principles,
594; Principles of liberalism as regards politics, 596 ; Socialistic theories, 600; At-
tacks upon the Church, 602; Axioms of the French atheists, 604; The Anti-Christ-
ian movement, 606; The Catholic position, 607; Misunderstanding of the real char-
acter of the French people, 609; The French people really religious, 610; Tha rea-
son why modern socialists endeavor to destroy, in the French working classes, belief

in the immortality of the soul, 611. WHAT THE CHURCH AND THE POPES HAVE DONE FOR THE SCIENCE OF

GEOGRAPHY. By John Gilmary Shea, . . . . . . . . . 612 The mission of the Church, 612; Geography during the first ages, 613; The Church encourages scriptural geography, 615; Geographical knowledge in Rome, 616; Migsionarieg increase geographical knowledge. 617; The crusades and their influence

iscience of geography, 619; Geographical progress in the fifteenth century, 621; Cosmography of Pope Pius II. 622: The voyages of Christopher Columbus, 623; American explorers, 625; Globes and mural maps ofthe Popes, 627; Jesuits and priests as cosmographers, 630; They explore America, 633; Tbe amount of

information gathered, 634. THE PAST AND THE PRESENT INDISSOLUBLY UNITED IN RELIGION.

By Rev. Henry Formby, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 635 The growth of the New World, 636; Aim of modern statesmanship, 637; Designs of God in our day, 638; Past associations and present dangers, 642; Knowledge of God presupposed in the preaching of the gospel, 644; Two props of the anti-Christian canse-first, modern statesmen, 646; Then modern scientists, 648; Design of Father Thebaud's work, 649; God's "treasure" and gist, 651; Antagonism of modern science to religion, 652; Value of Father Thebaud's work to Christians in this conflict, 653; Reasons for the confusion of languages and the dispersion of mankind, 654; Collateral subjects still remain for discussion, 655.

A PLAN FOR THE PROPOSED CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY. By Right Rev.

T. A. Becker, D.D., . . . . . . . . . . . . . 665 Deficiencies of schools and colleges, 656 ; Plan for the proposed building, 658; The corporators, 659; The endowment, 661; The faculties and professors, 663; Deficiencies of so-called graduates, 665; Urgent plea for a change, 666 ; Suggestions as to the professors, 667; The German system, 668; The completeness of the lecture system in Germany, 668; Examination of professors, 669; When and how a professor should be removed, 670; Examination of students-how it should be conducted, and what it should comprise, 670-673; Discipline of the students, 674; How instruction should be given, 674, 675; Other suggestions, 675, 676; Importance of the subject, 677-679.

THE NINE DAYS' QUEEN. S. M., . . . . .

. . . .080 Absence of the heroic in English royalty, 680; Lady Jane Grey, 681; Her talents unknown to her contemporarice, 682; Her parents, 684; Charles Brandon, his character of Lady Jane Grey, 686; Her early days, 686; Her associates, 688; Terrible death of Henry VIII, 691 ; Subsequent events, 692; Death of Catharine Parr, 694; Jane Grey in Seymour's care, 697; Bucer, 697; Seymour's execution, 698; Latimer's character of Seymour, 698; Aylmer and Ascham, 699; Lady Jane's letters, 701 : Her marriage, 703; Her dislike of her husband's parents, and wapt of affection for him, 704; Death of Edward VI, 705; Lady Jane's reign, 706; Her death, 710.

WHO IS TO BLAME FOR THE LITTLE BIG HORN DISASTER? By Very

Rev. Edward Jacker, . . . . . . . . . . . . . 712 Custer's defeat, 712; Our Indian policy, 713; The Dacotas, 714; Their first visitors, 716; Father Menard on Lake Superior, 718; The war of the Dacotas and the Hurong, 719; Father Allooez and the Dacotas, 724; Massacre of Dacota envoys, 728 ; Jesuit

efforts to open a mission, 730; First mission, 732; Linguistic appendix, 739. How SHALL WE MEET THE SCIENTIFIC HERESIES OF THE DAY? By

X. C. S. P., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 741 Guizot's misrepresentations, 743; Balmes' refutation of them, 744; Variety of method and harmony of belief, 745; History of European philosophy, 746; Necessity for the cultivation of natural sciences, 748; Modern needs and the remedy, 750; The strength of the religious position, 751 ; The scientific infidelity of the day, 752.

BOOK NOTICES.

WOW

.

....

........

570

..., 187

**.

.**..................

184

570

.................................. 765

186

576 576

Adventures of a Protestant in Search of a | Kenrick's Primacy of the Apostolic See........ 574 Religion ................... ................... 188 Key of Heaven......

..... 575 Alzog's Manual of Universal Church History, 377 Allies' Formation of Christendom.........

Lavelle's, Madame de, Bequest...................... Acolyte, The........................... .......... American State and Statesmen...................... Miscellanea

Meditations, New Practical..

..... 190 Brute, Memoirs of Bishop.......................... Mathilda of Capossa.............

380 Confession, Segur's.......

Newman's, Dr., Characteristics................... S82 Ceremonial for the Use of the Catholic

Church in America...... Catholicity, Evidences of................

187 officium Parvum Beatæ Mariæ Virginis........

........... 18 Chesnel's Les droits de Dieu et les Idees Modernes................

i Principia, a Basis of Social Science...... Catholic Church and Christian State............ 569 Painting, Schools and Masters of................ Coleridge's Life of our Life..

Puritan Revolution....

...... 767 Catholic Church in the United States, History of..................

765 Rituale Romanum.......... Cortes' Essays.........

............... 7

Reformation, History of the Protestant........ 187 Darwiniana, Fisher's.....

Reader, Young Ladies' Progressive..............

Real Life..... England, Lingard's History of............

Roper, Margaret; or, the Chancellor and His Essays......

............
Daughter .........

............. 576 Freemasonry; its Secret Warfare Against

Saints, Lives of the............. Church and State.........

Seigneret, Life and Letters of Paul............. Franciscan Missions........

................ 766

Spalding's Archbishop's Miscellanea.............. Fourier's Theory ...............

Sin and Its Consequences.

Sacred Heart, New Manual of.. ..................... Ghost, Holy, The Internal Mission of the..... 174

Sisters of Mercy, Little Companion of the..... Graduale de Tempore et de Sanctis..............

Sacred Heart, Glories of............. ............ 572 Gentilism, Thebaud's.....

......... Gospels, Exposition of. By Bishop McEvilly.. 759 Geographies, Mitchell's..

Talmud, Selections from the......................... Geographies, Sadlier's .............

Thomas, St., of Canterbury.......................... Geographies, O'Shea's......

Terra Incognita; or Convents of the United
Kingdom .....................

............ 573 Haven's Ancient and Modern Philosophy.... 378 Two Thousand Years After............ ............. 768 John, St., Life of the Apostle......

Vesperale Romanum........... Jesus, Heart of, Devotion to the..

.................. 188 ......... 192 Jenkins', 0. T., Handbook of British and

Wiseman's, Cardinal, Essays................. 177 American Literature............... ............. 384 Jesus Christ, Union with Our Lord............ 576 Yoland of Groningen....... ............

.............

...... 768

......

......

1

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USED IN THE BEST SCHOOLS.

Brown's English Grammars

REVISED EDITIONS BY HENRY KIDDLE, A.M.,

Superintendent of Schools of New York City.

Brown's First Lines of English Grammar, $0 45
Brown's Institutes of English Grammar, 100

The excellence of Brown's Grammars is very generally, admitted, and notwithstanding the multitude of School Grammars which have come in competition with them, they have steadily advanced in public favor. In perspicuous arrangement, accuracy of definition, fullness of illustration, and comprehensiveness of plan, they stand unrivalled, and are probably more extensively used throughout the United States than any other works on the subject. Brown's Grammar of English Grammars,

Over 1000 pp., royal 8vo, ........$6 25 The Grammar of English Grammars is an invaluable book of reference, and every scholar should have a copy in his library. No teacher can afford to be without it.

“Brown's Grammar is unquestionably the Grammar of the English Language. In an experience of nearly thirty years in teaching, I have seen the fraternity annually encountering a flood of new Grammars, intended to submerge Brown. But the stout old teacher refuses to be submerged; his solid masonry resists the flood-which latter is itself an incontestible proof that a better Grammar than Brown's has not yet been found."-BENJAMIN MASON, Yonkers Military Academy.

FRIENDS' ELEMENTARY AND HIGH SCHOOL, BALTIMORE, MD., 5th mo. 12, 1873. I am still using Brown's Grammars in this institution, preferring them to others because they are at once comprehensive and methodical. Beginning with an explanation of what grammar is, and the parts into which it is divided, it takes up each part in detail, places the great principles of the language before the eye of the learner, and impresses them upon his mind by definitions and rules so perspicuous, So simple, yet so comprehensive, that he cannot fail to understand them

Definitions are illustrated by examples; rules are followed by practical exercises both in parsing and false syntax. Parsing commences with etymology, and thus the student not only learns what each part of speech is, but its relation to other words in the sentence. Going on by constant repetitions aud easy gradations he becomes thoroughly acquainted with the whole subject.

Prosody is treated in a manner as thorough and methodical. The examples are so well chosen, the

Prosody is treated in a manonly acquainted with the whole suho by constant repetitions and exercises for practice so numerous, that with the aid and direction of a competent teacher the student can gain so full a knowledge of versification, and the right use of figurative language, as almost to preclude the necessity for studying that branch of rhetoric.

ELI M. LAMB, Principal.

Very Favorable Terms for Introduction.

ADDRESS

WILLIAM WOOD AND CO.,

27 Great Jones St., New York.

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