A Manual of Ethics

Első borító
Cosimo, Inc., 2005. jan. 1. - 472 oldal
The ethos of a people... we may say, constitutes the atmosphere in which the best members of a race habitually live...-from "The Virtues"Offered as a textbook for university students and drawing from both classical and modern schools of philosophical thought-from Aristotle and the Bible to Mill, Hume, and Kant-this comprehensive 1901 overview of the universe of ethical thought is still a valuable resource today. The fascinating discussions within explore: .the nature of ethics.the art of conduct.ethics and the physical sciences.ethics and economics.psychological hedonism.the true sense of freedom.the origin of conscience.the moral connoisseur.the general problem of authority.the social universe.theories of punishment.morality and religion.and more.A book to dip into at random or to read in-depth, this is as fresh and original today as it was a century ago.British philosopher JOHN STUART MACKENZIE (1860-1935) was professor of logic and philosophy at the University College of South Wales and Monmouthshire, and a fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge.

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Tartalomjegyzék

Application of Evolution to Morals 2 Develop
243
The General Problem of Authority 2 Different Kinds
269
The Social Unity
291
The Social Imperative 2 Justice 8 Law and Public
319
Note on Justice
329
Note on Rules of Conduct
349
The Higher Individualism 2 Conversion 8 Con
374
Moral Pathology
393

Note on Sociology
113
ChapTBR VI This Significance op the Morai
126
Note on the Meaning of Conscience
146
Early Greek Ethics 1 2 The Sophists 3
151
The General Idea oe Morai Law 1 1
190
Chapter VILMoral Progress
413
Social Evolution 9L The Moral Universe 8 Inner
426
The Demand for the Infinite 10 The Two
451
Note on Kant 203
460
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428. oldal - By faith Abraham, when he was called to go out into a place which he should after receive for an inheritance, obeyed ; and he went out, not knowing whither he went.
219. oldal - No reason can be given why the general happiness is desirable, except that each person, so far as he believes it to be attainable, desires his own happiness. This, however, being a fact, we have not only all the proof which the case admits of, but all which it is possible to require, that happiness is a good : that each person's happiness is a good to that person, and the general happiness, therefore, a good to the aggregate of all persons.
96. oldal - For my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade, love or hatred, pain or pleasure. I never can catch myself at any time without a perception, and never can observe anything but the perception.
213. oldal - The only proof capable of being given that an object is visible is that people actually see it. The only proof that a sound is audible is that people hear it; and so of the other sources of our experience. In like manner, I apprehend, the sole evidence it is possible to produce that anything is desirable is that people do actually desire it.
183. oldal - ... you cannot form a notion of this faculty, conscience, without taking in judgment, direction, superintendency. This is a constituent part of the idea, that is, of the faculty itself : and to preside and govern, from the very economy and constitution of man, belongs to it. Had it strength, as it has right ; had it power, as it has manifest authority, it would absolutely govern the world.
170. oldal - A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored by little statesmen and philosophers and divines. With consistency a great soul has simply nothing to do.
414. oldal - I stand and look at them long and long. They do not sweat and whine about their condition, They do not lie awake in the dark and weep for their sins, They do not make me sick discussing their duty to God...
75. oldal - In being desired for its own sake, it is, however, desired as part of happiness. The person is made, or thinks he would be made, happy by its mere possession, and is made unhappy by failure to obtain it. The desire of it is not a different thing from the desire of happiness, any more than the love of music or the desire of health. They are included in happiness. They are some of the elements of which the desire of happiness is made up. Happiness is not an abstract idea, but a concrete whole ; and...
196. oldal - There are who ask not if thine eye Be on them; who, in love and truth Where no misgiving is, rely Upon the genial sense of youth: Glad hearts! without reproach or blot, Who do thy work, and know it not: Oh ! if through confidence misplaced They fail, thy saving arms, dread Power!
382. oldal - What does he therefore, but resolves to give over toiling, and to find himself out some factor, to whose care and credit he may commit the whole managing of his religious affairs; some divine of note and estimation that must be. To him he adheres, resigns the whole warehouse of his religion, with all the locks and keys into his custody, and indeed makes the very person of that man his religion ; esteems his associating with him a sufficient evidence and commendatory of his own piety.

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