The History of Christianity in India: From the Commencement of the Christian Era, 2. kötet

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R. B. Seeley, 1839
 

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Arrives at Coulanhistory of its capture by the Portuguese 167
19
Session 1st Opened with the Archbishops address explanatory
23
Capuchins separate from communion with the Jesuits 462
24
Zeal of the heathen at Calaré an example for Christians 172
25
Carmelites again propose the abdication of bis dignity and
26
Papal opposition to the translation of the Bible especially in Eng
31
Death of Menezes sister and the King of Spainhe imposes on
37
Children to be baptized in
45
DECREE PAGE
97
PROCEEDINGS AFTER THE SYNOD
119
to them 189
120
Instructs the Syrian ecclesiastics in the Roman ceremonials and pro
130
BOOK FIFTH
143
He is disturbed by the exhibition of a farce at Pallur which he sup
190
The Rajahs alleged superstitious character
199
Progress of the Roman church in Malabardestitute state of some
205
Missionaries from Goa dispersed over India
210
Failure of his schemes in India
212
Failure of the Bengal Mission
217
Commencement of the Madura Mission
218
Robert de Nobili the Jesuit Missionary there
221
Extent of their influence
222
Their immoral character
227
Jesuitsexclusive attention to the brahmins
228
Jesuits assume the dignity and character of brahminsthey forge a deedreflections on this imposture
230
The objectionable character of their publications in the native lan guage
232
The four Hindoo Vedas R de Nobili forges a fifth
237
Epic poem of R C J Beschi
241
Jesuits adopt brahminical customs
244
Their contempt of the lower castes
245
Jesuits incorporate the heathen customs with the ceremonies of the Roman Church
249
Protest of other orders against their proceedings
253
The Popes endeavours to restrain them prove unavailing
254
Concluding remarks
256
CHAPTER IV
260
His letter to the King of Portugal
261
Proofs of liberality
265
Portuguese ambassador at his court at whose suggestion he sends for Jesuits
267
Several arrive at his court aud are favourably received
269
Declares his preference for Christianity 26
270
Akbars candour 271
271
Argues with Mahornedans in favour of the Gospel 272
273
One induced to remain by his renewed expressions of regard
274
He returns triumphant from the field again appears less friendly to the missionary
275
causes himself to be wor shipped
276
Reflections on his impiety
277
The missionary leaves him
278
Prosperity of his affairs
279
J Xavierand E Pinnero sent to Akbar who perseveres in his own new law
281
He flees in alarm to Cashmere
282
JahanGueir baptism of his nephews
284
re view of his works
285
Vestiges of the lost ten tribes of Israel in Cashmere and other countries
287
ment of facts
293
Stephen de Britto and Francis Garzia successively prelates of Malabar 294
294
The Christians dissatisfaction at the Jesuits oppressionsobtaining no redress from Rome they revolt and choose the Archdeacon for their ruler
295
Four Carmelites sent from Rome to reclaim them
296
The Dutch take Columbothe Christians seek a prelate from Syria
297
Bishop Attalla appointed from MosulRomanist attempts to depre ciate his character
302
A letter imputed to him
303
Christians attempt to rescue him but without effect
304
They resolve to expel the Jesuits
305
Consternation of the Jesuits and Inquisition
308
Two Carmelites arrive at Suratdissatisfaction of the Jesuits and Portuguese at their arrival
312
They reach Cannanore under protection of the Dutch
313
Interview with the cattanar of Palur
314
Visit to RapolinoArchdeacon receives them with suspicion Jesuits oppose them
315
They refuse to recognise Archdeacons consecration
316
Apply to Portuguese for protectionobtain it after some demur
317
Jesuitsopposition to it unavailing
318
Ruin of Portuguese in India attributed to Jesuits
319
Christians there demand separation from the Jesuits
320
25 The rector favours themArchdeacon publishes a circular againsl them he is induced to be more moderate
321
removal to Cochin or Goaproposal rejected
323
Portuguese give them further supporta grand mass at Corolongate
324
They consult the commissary of Inquisition how to proceed and receive a visit from himmurder of a Syrian
325
Several churches submit to Rome
340
He proposes to submit through fear of the heathen princes
342
Archdeacon warned against them by an anonymous letterbreaks off the conference
343
Another assemblydisturbed by the JesuitsJoseph the Carmelite elected Bishop of Malabar
344
Hi F Garzia protests against itgains no redress
345
The union of the southern churches effected F Garzia tries in vain to recover sole possession of the diocese
347
CHAPTER II
349
A Romish Archdeacon nominated by F Garzia
350
Is welcomed in Malabar the Jesuits submit to him with reluctance
354
The Archdeacon tries to prejudice the people against him
355
Simple preaching of the Gospel more impressive
358
Bishops varied progress
359
Conference carried on by deputies at the court of Cochin Bishop attempts to justify the employment of heathen judges in this eccle siastical cause
360
Archdeacons fears for his safety 862
362
Stories invented to discredit the Archdeacon and to justify the Bishops violence
363
Archdeacon with difficulty makes his escape
364
Bishops chagrin at losing him
365
Submission of Candanate and Molandurte
366
Time of retribution arrives
367
The Dutch capture Coulan and Cranganore
368
Their seige of Cochin good conduct of the Syrians 869
369
the church of Angamale put up to auction Bishop buys it
371
Dutch resume the seige of Cochin and take it
372
reflections on this policy
375
Bishop consecrates a native over the diocese
377
gives a false view of their tenets for the purpose
378
receives tidings of the new prelates success
380
his measures approved at Rome
382
Bishop tries in vain to return to Malabar
383
Account of Nestorian Monophysite and Jacobite prelates
384
3d The Syrians called Eutychians and Jacobites
386
Brief record of events to the year 1750
389
CHAPTER III
399
Their second charter and first settlement in India
400
Their success against the Portuguese whom they drive from Ormus
401
Driven from eastern islands they settle in the Camatic after some opposition from the Dutch
402
Establishment of the presidency of Madras
403
Opposed by the French and driven from Bantam by the Dutch
404
French obtain a settlement at Poudicherry
406
build Fort William Calcutta constituted a presidency
408
Their responsibility to God for their eastern empire too little regarded
410
the little measure of attention subsequently given to the subject
412
English encourage Capuchins at Madras
417
Rescue a Capuchin missionary from the Inquisition at Goa
418
Refuse to countenance the Jesuits for reasons assigned
420
CHAPTER IV
426
They forcibly deprive the Capuchins of some land
432
Cardinal de Tournon sent to India and China as papal Legate
439
His reception at the court of Pekin Vicar Apostolic banished
450
He recovers and returns to Pekin
456
arrives in China
465
Establishment of a monastery at Pondicherry
472
Detection of Jesuits imposture and its consequences
479
CHAPTER V
494
Protest against this appalling conclusion
500
From protestant missionaries success is inferred the duty of perse
506
All differences about preemi in fourteen chapters
525
None are to preach to the the form of baptism
564
Baptismal registers to be kept be so rectified as to adapt
583
The Doctrine of the Sacrament of Confir Theodoras and Diodorus
591
Women before childbirth and 14 Forbids heathen musicians
597
Of the Sacrament of Penance
598
Confession to be made in sick
604
VOL II
609
Those only who took the con
610
Such as have been simonai
616
Regulates the dress and man
622
Wives who refuse to leave
626
Marriages to be celebrated
632
Appoints seasons for marrying
638
Pluralities condemned
644
The Syrian Christians custom
650
DECREE PAGE
656
Causes that defile a church
662
The Syrian Christians to
668
Appendix B Litany c to
684

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214. oldal - For as the rain cometh down, And the snow from heaven, And returneth not thither, But watereth the earth, And maketh it bring forth and bud, That it may give seed to the sower, and bread to the eater: So shall my word be that goeth forth out of my mouth: It shall not return unto me void, But it shall accomplish that which I please, And it shall prosper in the thing whereto I sent it.
228. oldal - And even as they did not like to retain God in their knowledge, God gave them over to a reprobate mind, to do those things which are not convenient, being filled with all unrighteousness, fornication, wickedness, covetousness, maliciousness ; full of envy, murder, debate, deceit, malignity ; whisperers, backbiters, haters of God, despiteful, proud, boasters, inventors of evil things, disobedient to parents, without understanding, covenant-breakers, without natural affection, implacable, unmerciful...
172. oldal - How that in a great trial of affliction, the abundance of their joy and their deep poverty abounded unto the riches of their liberality. 3 For to their power, I bear record, yea, and beyond their power they were willing of themselves ; 4 Praying us with much entreaty that we would receive the gift, and take upon us the fellowship of the ministering to the saints.
137. oldal - For it is impossible for those who were once enlightened, and have tasted of the heavenly gift, and were made partakers of the Holy Ghost, And have tasted the good Word of God, and the powers of the world to come, If they shall fall away, to renew them again unto repentance; seeing they crucify to themselves the Son of God afresh, and put him to an open shame.
310. oldal - God; having a form of godliness, but denying the power thereof: from such turn away. For of this sort are they which creep into houses, and lead captive silly women laden with sins, led away with divers lusts, ever learning, and never able to come to the knowledge of the truth. Now as Jannes and Jambres withstood Moses, so do these also resist the truth : men of corrupt minds, reprobate concerning the faith.
137. oldal - When the unclean spirit is gone out of a man, he walketh through dry places, seeking rest, and findeth none. Then he saith, 'I will return into my house from whence I came out;' and when he is come, he findeth it empty, swept, and garnished. Then goeth he, and taketh with himself seven other spirits more wicked than himself, and they enter in and dwell there: and the last state of that man is worse than the first.
481. oldal - Therefore, seeing we have this ministry, as we have received mercy, we faint not ; but have renounced the hidden things of dishonesty, not walking in craftiness, nor handling the word of God deceitfully, but, by manifestation of the truth, commending ourselves to every man's conscience in the sight of God.
310. oldal - But he said, Nay; lest while ye gather up the tares, ye root up also the wheat with them. Let both grow together until the harvest : and in the time of harvest I will say to the reapers, Gather ye together first the tares, and bind them in bundles to burn them: but gather the wheat into my barn.
490. oldal - To the weak became I as weak, that I might gain the weak. I am made all things to all men, that I might by all means save some.
287. oldal - For I testify unto every man that heareth the words of the prophecy of this book. If any man shall add unto these things, God shall add unto him the plagues that are written in this book : And if any man shall take away from the words of the book of this prophecy God shall take away his part out of the book of life, and out of the holy city and from the things which are written in this book.

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