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THE

TRAGICAL HISTORIE

OF OUR LATE BROTHER

ROBERT, EARL OF ESSEX

BY THE AUTHOR OF

HAMLET, RICHARD III, OTHELLO,

AS YOU LIKE IT, ETC.

AND OF THE NEWLY DISCOVERED TRAGEDY,

MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS.

DECIPHERED

FROM THE WORKS OF

SIR FRANCIS BACON,

BY

ORVILLE W. OWEN, M. D.

DETROIT, MICH.
HOWARD PUBLISHING COMPANY,

LONDON :
GAY & BIRD, 5, CHANDOS STREET.

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PUBLISHERS NOTE.

The present volume, "The Tragical History of Our Late Brother, Earl of Essex,” is published separately, out of its consecutive order, being complete in itself, and of the most thrilling interest and historical value, that it may be the earlier enjoyed as one of the marvels of literature, in advance of its appearance as a part of the later books of the series of Sir Francis Bacon's Cipher Writings.

Like its immediate predecessor, “The Tragedy of Mary Queen of Scots,” it has been deciphered from the Shakespeare Plays, and other works of Bacon, by means of the Cipher system, discovered by Doctor Owen, through which the hidden histories are being brought to light.

In the first book of the “Cipher Story,” issued in October, 1893, was the astounding statement that the great Chancillor was the son of Queen Elizabeth and Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester; and that Robert, Earl of Essex, was his brother. Corroboration of this is found in the recently published British “ Dictionary of National Biography,” Vol. 16, page 114, under the heading "Dudley :

· Whatever were the Queen's relations with Dudley before his wife's death, they became closer after. It was reported that she was formally betrothed to him, and that she had secretly married him in Lord Pembroke's house, and that she was a mother already.January, 1560–1.

“In 1562 the reports that Elizabeth had children by Dudley were revived. One Robert Brooks, of Devizes, was sent to prison for publishing the slander, and seven years later a man named Marsham, of Norwich, was punished for the same offence.”

This Tragedy confirms the statement.

The Comedy referred to in the Prologue is now being translated.

“The players that come forth, will to the life present
The pliant men that we as masks employ:
An excellent device to tell the plot,
And all our cipher practice to display.”

HOWARD PUBLISHING CO. March, 1895.

4.45516

INTRODUCTION.

The work of deciphering the literature, in which the Cipher of Sir Francis Bacon is found, reveals details of English history of wonderful interest, which only a participant in the events could record. Inwrought into this literature was hidden the “Tragedy of Mary Queen of Scots,” embracing Mary's attempts to gain the English crown, her trial, and her tragic end, written as a Play. This was published in December, 1894, and has been pronounced a masterpiece. Portions of it were found in every play attributed to Shakespeare, and in the writings of Spenser, Peele, Greene, Marlow, Burton, and Francis Bacon. Although a remarkable production, it is believed to be the first of Bacon's writings of historical drama in Cipher, and it is chiefly drawn from the earlier works and plays, before they were re-written and enlarged in 1608–17–23, incorporating later histories, and mat- ters of profound philosophical significance.

This “Tragedy of Essex,” obtained from the same sources, is a later production, and bears the impress of greater skill, more experience, and far more intense personal feeling.

In it are interwoven most important passages of Bacon's own life. It explains Bacon's participation in the trial and conviction of Essex, who had been his benefactor, and the seeming ingratitude which has so long been thought a blot upon the fame of the Lord High Chancillor. It was a life for a life! Essex was foredoomed to death. The Queen sought excuse in law for the deed; her commands were imperative :Queen. *

Robert Essex was
A worthy officer th' wars, but insolent,
O’er-come with pride, ambitious past all thinking,
Self-loving, and affecting one sole throne,
Without assistance.

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