Oldalképek
PDF
ePub

He was

[ocr errors]

He was also one of the original mem- | sions of Mr. Thomas Moore, he was bers and promoters of the Garrick induced to purify some of the especial Club. In 1831 he was obliged to aban- favorites of his muse from their grossdon bis town house, and to retire to a ness, and to convey through the mesmaller residence at Fulham. On one dium of his exquisite meloilies a moral occasion at this place, a friend was which was not intended by the poet.” viewing Putney bridge from a little ter- Canning, Tierney, Brougham, Grey, race that overhung the Thames, when and others figured in these melodies, he observed to his host that he had which caused much amusement to both heard it was a good investment, and political parties. When Lord Godeinquired “if such were the case — if rich resigned the premiership suddenly the bridge really answered ?" “I in 1827, Hook threw off a capital piece don't know," said Theodore, “but you of pleasantry in the shape of a police have only to cross it, and you are sure case, wherein Frederick Robinson was to be tolled."

charged at Bow Street with quitting But although he had moved to the his master's service without giving due quiet suburb of Fulham, he could not warning. escape from the social vortex.

But " The Ramsbottom Letters" still in request at the clubs, and at the were the best effusions in Hook's houses of the aristocracy, where his comic vein. Mrs. R.'s description of society was eagerly looked forward to. “ England and France” is delightful. Every year found him more deeply The old lady left London by way of embarrassed pecuniarily, while he was Westminster Bridge, to “ explode the slowly killing himself by late nights European continent." Having heard and social dissipation. To the last he travellers lament that they had not put bore up, however, but once as he stood down what they called the memory bilwith his coffee in his hand in a fash-ious of their journeys, she determined ionable drawing-room, le suddenly while on her tower to keep a dairy, so turned towards a large mirror and said, called from containing the cream of "Ah! I see I look as I am done up one's information. Before leaving Loniu purse, in mind, and in body too at don she visited Westminster Hall, and last.” His old brilliant powers of im- adwired its curious roof, after which, provisation were now only a memory. as everybody knows, its' builder was In the daytime he still strove to work called William Roofus.

66 When we at his new novel, “ Peregrine Bunce,” came to the Green Man at Blackbut it was never completed. Serious heath,” she continues, we had an disorders of the liver and stomach opportunity of noticing the errors of already had him in their grip. On the former travellers, for the heath is 13th of August, 1841, he took finally to green and the man is black." At his bed, and on the 24th of the same Rochester, the travellers “ went to the month he expired. He left a wife and Crown Inn, and had a cold collection ; five children, who were relieved by a the charge was absorbent.As they subscription set on foot by four true- passed near Chatham they saw several liearted friends. A sum of nearly Pitts, and some one showed them the £3,000 was subscribed, the king of Lines at Chatham, which they saw very Hanover alone — who was a warm ad- distinctly, with the clothes drying on mirer of Hook's talents — subscribing them. On arriving at Dover they went £500.

to bed immediately after dinner, as Hook's political songs were very they had to get up early, “to be ready clever, though of course to a great ex- for embrocation on the packet in the Lent they have lost their point with the morning.". When on board the steam present generation. • Having been packet, Mrs. R. was much surprised at frequently put to the blush by hearing the cabin, " where ladies and gentlevery modest young ladies, without a men are put upon shelves like books blush, warbling forth the amatory effu-l in a library, and where tall men are

66

a

doubled up like boot-jacks, before they statutes at large in marvel ; here we can be put away at all. A gentleman saw Mr. Backhouse and Harry Edney, .

, in a hairy cap, without his coat, laid whoever they might be, and a beautiful me perpendicularly on a mattrass, with grupe of Cupid and Physic, together a basin by my side, and said that was with several of the busks which Lavvy my birth. I thought it would have has copied, the original of which is in been my death, for I never was so in the Vacuum at Rome, which was fordisposed in all my life. There was no merly an office for government thunsymphony to be found amongst the tars der, but is now reduced to a stable, (so called from their smell), for just where the pope keeps his bulls.They before we went off I leard them throw afterwards visited the great church of a painter overboard, and directly after Naughty Dam, where they staid mass, they called out to one another to hoist so called from the crowd of people who up an ensign. I was too ill to inquire attend it, and the priest was very much what the poor young gentleman had incensed; they heard the Tedium sung, done."

which occupied three hours. They next Mrs. R, reported this incident just saw a beautiful statue of Henry Carter, before reaching Calais : “I was very and Mrs. R. fancied she saw in him a much distressed to see that a fat gentle- likeness to the Carters of Portsmouth. man who was in the ship, had fallen When the theatre was discussed, she into a fit of perplexity by over-reaching was surprised to hear a great deal himself, and if it had not been that we about Racing and Cornhill. They went had a doctor in the ship, who immedi- to the Jem Narse, where, after one of ately opened his temporary artery and the singers had done, “although everyhis jocular vein with a lancelot which body laughed, the whole house called he had in his pocket, I think we should out beast, beast, and the man, potwithhave seen liis end. It was altogether standing, was foolish enough to sing a most moving spectacle : be thought the song all over again.” One of the himself dying, and all his anxiety in old lady's daughters unfortunately the midst of his distress was to be able caught a cold and guittar through visitto add a crocodile to his will, in favor ing the Hecatombs ; a second daughter of his niece, about whom he appeared sprained her tender hercules ; while a very sanguinary.She deemed it right third caught a military fever, which it to warn travellers against the 'lish at was hoped would be cured by putting Calais hotels, for she overheard one of her through a regiment, and giving her the waiters call it poison. The French a few subterfuges. At the symetery of were still so fond of Bonaparte that the chaise and pair Mrs. R. amused they called the table-cloths Naps, in herself by copying the epigrams on the compliment to him. After dinner she tombstones. One of the latter, which was asked to have a chasse, but she looked like a large bath, was described was afraid of a hunting-party late at to her as a sark of a goose. At the night; then she found that chasse was Shamp de Mars she saw a review of a lickure called cure a sore (from its the Queerasses of the Royal Guard by a healing qualities), and very nice it was. sister of the late Dolphin – the Dolphin At Paris the travellers put up at the of France is the same as the Prince of Hotel Wag Ram, in the Rue de la Pay, Whales in England. The Duke of 80 called from its being the dearest Anglehame came by, who was quite a part of the town. 66 At the end of it is Ramrod in the chase. Mrs. R.'s traythe place Fumdum, where there is a elling friend Mr. Fulmer bought two pillow as higli as the Trojan's Pillow pictures in Paris one of Ten Years, at Rome, or the pompous pillow in the other of Old Beans. Egypt."

The Ramsbottoms afterwards visited The old lady thus continues : “We Rome, “or the internal city, as it is lost no'time in going into the gardens called.” They went to the church of of the Tooleries, where we saw the Salt Peter, and they saw a great statute

[ocr errors]

[ocr errors]

an

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

a

one

of Salt Peter himself, though Mr. Ful- the dinners of the House of Commons, mer thought it to be Jew Peter. The for I see they very often carry up their visitors also went to the church of St. bills to them." John the Latter end. At the Veteran All the letters are full of similar (which Mrs. R. foolishly called Vac- whimsical ideas and happy. turns of uun until she went there) they found thought. In his reviews of books many beautiful statutes, including one in John Bull Hook wielded a more of the body of the angel Michael, deadly pen, and many author " which has been ripped to pieces, dreaded his satirical onslaughts. He and is therefore said to be Tore- gave Tommy Moore especially a severe

Raffles's Transmigration " they roasting for his “Loves of the Authought to be finer than his Harpoons. gels.” But one cannot help thinking There were several beautiful works by of the miserable man himself, who, Hannah Bell Scratchy, and fine notwithstanding all his brilliant wit Dilapidation of St. John by George and satire, was of the most Honey. There was splendid cemetery wretched of beings. When in his last observable in the Venus of Medicine. struggles with death, he had little that The party exploded the Arch of Tights he could look back upon with satisfacand the Baths of Diapason, but Miss lion and composure. His half century Lavvy had the misfortune to fall of life had been largely misspent, and down on the Tarpaulin Rock in one while admiring his natural gifts and of her revelries. When they returned genius, posterity can but commiserate to England, Mrs. R. hoped to go to the man, passing as lightly as may be a little property in Gloucestershire, over his foibles and follies. but as she found that her late husband's creditors had got a lion on the estate, she would not expose herself to the mercy of a wild creature like

From Blackwood's Magazine. that. She had a French son-in-law

FELICITY BROOKE. who was so clever that Mr. Fulmer

MISS MOLLY." said he put him in mind of Confusion, the old China philosopher, who was a mandolin a few years ago. Mrs. R. Courage and Passion are the Immortal facts of took a house in Southampton Street, Life. Where they pass, the world marks the spot. London, which formerly belonged to To an outsider the confusion might Garrick, who wrote “The School for have seemed purposeless, but, in truth, Scandal ” and all Shakespeare's plays, all this noise and running hither and and who frequently had to dine with thither, and clanging of bells, and hinn Mr. Johuston, of Covent Garden, shouting of sailors, meant that the last and an old Goldsmith, of the name of moments were being counted out, beOliver. Through her son-in-law she fore the City of Prague started on her became acquainted with the Admirable Atlantic journey. Sir Sidney Smith, who made such a The deck was crowded in the usual disturbance in Long Acre many years way with those assembled to speed the ago. She was surprised to hear from parting, — those who had many playful another son-in-law, who was a member words at command, and those to whom of Parliament, that there was a din- it was sad earnest, and no word of any ing-room at the House of Commons. sort was possible. 66 Fulmer says you may see many a

A little apart from where the many man who has a stake in the country mourned or joyed, a man and a woman takivg his chop there. The place has stood close together by the vessel's also been famous for its beef-steaks side, – the man half kneeling on ever since the Rump Parliament. I seat, the woman standing straight and believe the House of Lords pays for motionless by his side. Euough like

BY THE AUTHOR OF

PART I.

a

arm,

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

ness to pronounce them brother and but he laid his band over the one that sister ; the same straight features and rested on his and side by side blonde hair, the same slenderness of they paced slowly up and down the figure and grace of movement.

deck. “Aymer,” she bent forward, after a Good-byes are said in so many ways. silence which seemed the result of a Hilda Forsythe's grey eyes were full of difficulty in wording her thoughts, and tears, though not one fell; her voice so leaning, laid her hand on his shoul- when she spoke - and words grew der, “you are going to be happy out fewer with cach passing moment there ?"

trembled a little, but each syllable “Don't you worry about me,” reached her listener's ear, - the touch though he did not turn his eyes from of the hand on hers told her what the where they were fixed on the shore, separation cost her companion. Perthere was a thrill of feeling in his haps behind the silence there was as tones. “ Anyway, you know,” sud- bitter a heartache as that which found denly looking up, “it was not your expression in those loud sobs, at the fault."

sound of which she looked round “She was my friend," the woman startled. said sadly. "If I had not loved her, A dowdy, fair-haired, elderly Gerbelieved in her, I should not have man weeping loudly and unrestrainwished my only brother to marry her. edly, her reddened eyelids and wet I cannot even now think what tempted cheeks forming a most unpicturesque her 1"

exhibition of woe. But utterly heed“ Cannot you ?” the man retorted, less of spectators, regardless of the mockingly. “I do not attempt to com- angry words and pushes of those who pare myself to a grey-bearded, decrepit would have thrust her aside, her bonnet duke !"

crooked, her ungloved hands in her “Ah, hush, Aymer,” his sister in- companion's, she stood there pouring terposed gently,“ do not be bitter. out last words and thoughts. Vanity, ambition, may govern With the instinct of avoiding such an woman, but do not allow yourself to exhibition of trouble, Mrs. Forsythe imagine it is the rule for all."

turned back, and as she did so, Oh, "Not while you live, Hilda,” — he Aymer,” she exclaimed, roused from spoke more gravely, and he took her her own thoughts, 66 what a beautiful hands in his as he spoke ; " but re- girl !! member, it is not the vanity or ambi- His eyes followed the direction of tion which I judge so severely – let her hers. Yes,” he said absently, she try what they will do to help her ! - is handsome,- she is with that Niobe but the cowardice,” there was a sudden over yonder! They have come, or flash in the grey eyes,

" which kept me rather she has come, to say good-bye to dangling on through a long delusive that German lover, or brother." engagement — to end in this. There,"? “ Brother, I think,” Hilda said genstanding upright, “that is the last tly; “ they are very much alike.” But word, - and I did not intend it should while she spoke, her eyes still followed have been spoken ; what is the good ! the now vanishing figure of the girl I am going to America to shoot big who had attracted her attention. A game, and generally amuse myself; girl of perhaps fifteen, in a sailor-like Wyndham will meet me in New York, dress of blue serge, the shirt open a and from there I will write to you, and little at the throat, a cloth cap on her give you a fresh address. Write often, thick curls. Her dark eyes were set won't you ?

under slightly arched brows, a brilliant "Of course.

And you ? You will color was in her cheeks, her young not let long silences give me time to curved mouth was scarlet as a pomegrow anxious ?” He did not reply, granate bud. A minute later she had

[ocr errors]

one

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

an

disappeared from sight; her move- |sible, the gangway plank was crowded ments were as young and strong and with a stream of people makiug their vigorous as the color on her cheeks and way on shore. the light in ber eyes.

Without explanatory word “Let us go away from here,” Aymer when both knew, words were unneces. said, as, for about the tenth time, their sary — brother and sister followed the walk was checked by a hurrying sailor, departing throng. a mourning or jocose passenger,

• I For a moment the man paused ere cannot stand it any longer.”

reaching the exit, and clasped a little So saying, he turned and sought the closer the hand he held, and, at the solitude of the upper deck. Total sol- same moment, stooped his head and itude, so at least they fancied, till a kissed her. more complete survey showed them it “Good-bye, Hilda, I shall look for was shared by the girl whom Mrs. For- letters.' sythe had noticed before.

“Good-bye, Aymer," her voice “ Wise child,” Sir Aymer observed, was unsteady - remember I shall live when he caught sight of the blue serge in the hope of your return.' skirt, .6 or discreet child! She has For a second her eyes were lifted to also thought it desirable to put as much bis ; then her tall figure had mingled space as possible between her and her with the crowd, almost unconscious, as weeping guardian.”

she hurried along, of anything but her She was evidently unconscious of own sad thoughts, behind the shelter of their presence,

for she was kneeling on her veil. the seat that ran round the deck, look- On the deck Aymer Digby stood ; ing down with amusement and interest well aware of those loving, watching on the moving, excited crowd below. eyes, he never moved as long as the She held her cap in her hand, and outlines of that quiet, tall figure were Mrs. Forsythe's looks were still at- visible, standing a little apart from the tracted towards her.

small crowd which surrounded her. “ She is beautiful,” she said Loa And, after all, it was not very long child, of course ; and yet there is some twilight was throwing a haze over thing about her, perhaps the way her everything, even before his reverie was hair grows, that reminds me of the pic- disturbed by the loud, angry voice tures of Henrietta Maria."

which jerked out furious observations, “She is rather like her," Sir Aymer in his immediate vicinity, at the presreplied, looking in her direction for a ence still on board of some belated vismoment, though I guess that child itor. It did not need the look he gave did not take as long to arrange her to assure him that the sobbing woman curls as did Henrietta Maria."

being hurried away into the semi-darkThe likeness consisted in a wave of ness, utterly regardless of the angry the hair from the straight, clear part- words, was the same German woman ing, before it rippled and fell in short, whose loud weeping bad alternately thick curls. A few seconds later the annoyed and touched him earlier in the dark eyes were raised, and made the afternoon. discovery that she was no longer alone, "Well, poor soul, the wrench is over and with the discovery she vanished. now ;” and he looked with a sort of

When Sir Aymer Digby turned in his wondering pity at her disordered hair, walk, and found such to be the case, he and red, swollen eyelids, the tears dripwas relieved,– it made it easier to say ping disconsolately down her cheeks ; these last words to his sister,

it was with a sigh of relief his eyes And the moment for last words had turned back to Hilda Forsythe's quiet, arrived.

graceful figure and clasped hands. A great bell was clanging loudly and Long after it was impossible to see fiercely, an insistent whistle was ren- her, he knew the expression in her dering speech and hearing alike impos. Itender grey eyes.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
« ElőzőTovább »