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fantastic sort of slow dance. Now and reached an altitude of over nine thouthen one suddenly disappeared only to sand feet, when the track I had folsee a new one rising from the ground lowed seemed to brauch off, and one in a cone-like shape, and revolving branch went to the south-west, the with incredible rapidity soon reached a other to the north-west, round one of great height. As I was crossing the the smaller peaks. I took the southplain I was nearly caught in one of west one ; it led me to a point where these violent whirlwinds myself, as no human being could go any farther. they travel so quickly and in such a Where I was the slope of the mountain very erratic fashion, that it is not an was such that it required a steady foot easy matter to get out of their way. not to be sliding down into a precipice ; The buzzing, as it passed near, was a little farther a long glacier extended something awful, and the dust that it from top to bottom of the mountain, so raised was blinding.

I left the track and attempted to climb All along, though travelling through the lower peak just above me, to see if a plain, I was on a high land, and when from that point of vantage I could disat Tao-la-tsouei the altitude was over cover the right trail. It was easier four thousand feet. The wind grew in said than done, especially as I was intensity during the afternoon, and, as carrying a water-color paint-box and a it blew in my face, made the travelling block slung to a strap on my shoulvery uncomfortable. At times it was ders; still, after a good deal of hard all I could do to hold on to my saddle. work, and going upon my hands and A regular dust-storm, like the simoon knees, I managed to crawl up to the in the Sahara, passed over in the after- top. I was so hot, and the view was noon, and for some time my men and so lovely from up there, that I sat on a myself were at a loss as to where we stone on the edge of the slope and were going. We lost the track in the opened my paint-box to take a sketch. blinding dust, and had some difficulty As I was sorting out the brushes, unin finding it again.

luckily the stone on which I was sitFinally we reached Tkou-fo-pu, and ting gave way, and I started sliding soon after I was at the foot of the great down the almost perpendicular slope, sacred mountain of Siao-outai-shan. and no effort on my part to stop my We did not put up at the village as involuntary tobogganing was of ang there were no inns, but, mounting the avail. I tried to clutch the ground slopes of the mountaiu, halted at the with my pails, I seized every projecttemple of Tie-liv-tsen at an altitude of ing stone in hopes of stopping my preover four thousand three hundred and cipitous descent; but hélas ! at the fifty feet.

Accommodation for pil- speed I was going it was no easy matter grins is provided at this temple in the to hold on to anything that I even temple grounds, but it was no better managed to clutch. than that of the commoner inns.

There I had death staring me in the Not far from the temple a curious face, for another hundred yards would batural bridge of ice over a stream was have brought me to the edge of the quaint and pretty, and the huge Siao precipice, and over I would have gone, towering over my head, with large taking a fatal leap of several hundred patches of snow and ice on its slopes, feet. My hair stood on end as every made we long for the next morning to second I was approaching the dreaded ascend its highest peak. The next spot; and how well I remember the morning came, and at 5 A.M. I set out ghastly sound of my heavy paint-box on the steep track, accompanied by a which had preceded me in my disasMongol guide. As I was walking too trous descent. How well I remember quickly for him he was soon left far the hollow sound of it banging from behind, and I proceeded by myself, boulder to boulder, echoed and magnisure that I could find my way without fied a thousand times from one mounhim. Things went well until I had 'tain to another. Then there was a

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final bang from down far, far below; on his heels and quietly smoking his the echo weakly repeated it, and all pipe. He showed me the right track, was silence once more. Another half and away I walked by myself again as minute and the echo would have re- he was such a slow walker. I made peated a hollower sound still! I shut him give me my oil-paint box, which my eyes.

he was carrying for me, and with it, A violent shock, which nearly tore following a comparatively easy but my body in two, made me think that I steep track, I first reached a sort of

over ; but 20 as luck a small, solidly built shed, and then would have it I had suddenly stopped. climbing up the steeper and fairly dauI opened my eyes, but I did not dare gerous part of the track, finally reached move, for my position, though much the summit of the highest peak. I said improved, was far from being safe yet. "fairly dangerous,” for the last few I was now only about ten or fifteen yards before one reaches the top of the yards from the edge, and in the most pinnacle are not more than one foot violent state of excitement, partly due wide, and on both sides is a precipice to the bright lookout of the delayed the end of which one can hardly see. leap and at the pleasant hope of saving In fact, the performance for those few my life altogether. I was half uncon- yards was not unlike tight-rope walkscious when this happened, and it took ing, only at an altitude of about twelve me some minutes to realize how and thousand feet. where I was. I knew that I was The summit of the highest peak hanging somewhere, but to what I was is nothing but a huge, barren rock, hanging, and from what, and how, I and on the top, only about ten feet in did not know, as I was hanging from diameter, the credulous pilgrims have my back. It was a state of suspense, erected a small wooden shrine, some but that was all I

three or four feet square and six feet As I slowly got my wits about me high. The poor bronze images of again, to my great horror I discovered Buddha inside it were stuffed with bits that as yet my life was hanging to a of paper, for which purpose a special hair like Damocles' sword. My coat hole is provided at the base of the imand a strong leather strap which I had age, and on which prayers were writslung under my arm had just caught ten, or else “ wishes” that pilgrims over a projecting stone, and that was were anxious to obtain. what had stopped me from proceeding At the elevation on which I stood on any farther towards certain death ; but Siao-outai-shan, and fortunate enough the slightest false movement on my to have hit on a lovely day, I compart, as a jerk, might still place me in manded from there the grandest panogreat danger. Slowly, as my back was rama it has ever been my good fortune slightly resting on the almost perpen-to gaze upon. Mountain range after dicular slope, I tried to get a footing, mountain range of huge mountains, and when this was done the great diffi- blending from warm brownish tints culty was to turn round. After several into pure blue, encircled me on the minutes of auxiety which seemed ages, south and south-east side, and close at also this feat was successfully accom- hand towards the north-east. plished, and there I stood half-lying Mount Show-ho-ling, 6,582 feet above with my body on the ground, and sea-level, looked a mere toy by the side clutching the rock that had saved my of his gigantic neighbor. life, until my commotion had entirely I made a weak attempt at portraying passed away, and I began to crawl up, this scene in oils, and another weaker as I had done before, as best I could, still at a bird's-eye view of the endless cat-like fashion.

stretch of flat land on the norih and I reached the treacherous trail again, north-west side, with, to the naked and followed it back to where it parted, eye, the hardly perceptible chain of and there I found the guide squatting the Huang-yan-shang mountain mass

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forming a high barrier on its northern No incidents nor accidents marked border.

the descent, and late in the afternoon I I re-descended a short way in order was again at the temple at the foot of to visit the small temple on the side of the mountain. The following moroing, a precipice, and to which one can only much before suurise, one of the muleaccede through a few planks suspended teers came to wake me up with the over the precipice itself, and which, to startling news that the bonzes or priests all appearance, were neither solid nor of the temple had just attempted to safe. However, one does a good many extort money from him, and that he foolish things for curiosity's sake that was commissioned to bring me the folone would not do otherwise, and I did lowing message : “Either I paid the not like leaving that interesting spot bonzes a sumi equivalent of £12 for acwithout being able to say that I had commodation in the temple compound, seen all that there was to see. I, or they would do away with me. therefore, walked along the narrow " Tell them yes,” was my answer, and shaky planks, balancing myself as " but not till sunrise,” and at the same well as I could ; but I must confess time ordered the muleteer to have that when I had traversed the precipice everything ready to start with the first from one end to another, and felt equal rays of light. to Blondin for going across Niagara on There was certainly a great commoa wire, my patience was rather put to tion in the temple compound, and as I a test when I discovered that the last noiselessly made a hole through my plank of this primitive scaffolding had paper window, I could see the shaven either fallen or been removed, and to boozes running from one room into reach the platform of the temple a another and confabulating among themjump of over a yard was necessary. selves. I loaded the five chambers of This unexpected acrobatic feat, when my revolver, and kept ready for any you know that if by mistake you missed emergency. At dawn things were the platform or slipped you would bave ready to start, and the mules were a drop of three or four hundred feet laden under my supervision, while all before you touched ground again, was the bonzes were standing in front of rather beyond even my usual amount the main gate, probably to prevent my of foolishness; still, I could not resist going through. One of them attempted the temptation, and I jumped. In the to shut the gate, but I stopped him, temple there was but little to see, with and, setting one of the Frenchmen on the exception of long rows of small guard of it with a rifle, I made mules, images of Buddha, similar to the ones muleteers, and baggage leave the comin the other shrine, and equally stuffed pound through the violent remonstrawith “ wishes” to be granted. They tions of the bouzes, who had now were the offers of pilgrims, and some become like so many wild beasts. were gilt, others of bronze color.

The usual money due to them for The jumping from the platform back two nights' lodging, I think about on to the narrow plank was even a thirty shillings, was paid to the chief niore risky performance than the re- bonze, and as he seemed to give way verse achievement, but with the pre- to his temper, I set my revolver under caution of taking my boots off so as not his nose, which suddenly changed him to slip, even this difficulty was sur- and the others into a most affectedly mounted, and to my heart's content I civil lot. now made progressive strides towards Thus we parted friends. We dedescending the mountain. Both on scended the hillside, and as the northern and southern slopes large some way down I saw one of the young patches of ice and snow covered the bouzes come out of the temple comcavities and sheltered nooks of the lofty pound by a back way, and run towards peak, but the parts more exposed to the village of Tkou-fo-pu, probably to the sun were free of either.

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rise the natives against us. As I had

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thought, when, half an hour later, we would not employ him, as I hate to be entered the village, we were met by a imposed upon by humbugs ; and knowvery rowdy crowd, and subjected to all ing the little way which these gentlesorts of insults, stones even being fired men have of digging large holes on at us, but we managed to pull through purpose in the river-bed while dry in all right, and, retracing our steps summer, so as to extort money from whence we had come, arrived at Sheu- timid travellers, I proceeded to “sell” men-tzu that same night. From this him. I guided my mules not right point I decided to return to Pekin by across the water, for the holes are geua different route, journeying north-east erally dug where most unaware people instead of south-east. We were thir- are likely to cross, but a few yards teen bours ou our saddles between farther up, therefore landing every one Sheu-men-tzu and the next balting- safely on the other side, with the excepplace, Fan-chan-pu, but nothing hap- tion of one donkey, who, in strict simpened of very great interest. We went ilarity with all the evil spirits of Chiua, through a curious gorge past Ouang- insisted on going on his own account kia-yao, lined all along with willow- in a straight line in front of his nose, trees, but neither

nor with the result, that when he reached Mie-tchan, or Tie-na, appeared to be the middle of the stream, he fell into villages of any great importance. one of the holes, and with the weight Kiem-tsuen had the advantage of being of the load he was carrying, disapof a much larger size.

peared. Only the points of his ears The marshes of Chang-Chui-mo, could be seen wagging out of the water. which we passed on our left, were pic- The hole-man, if I may call him so, turesque with their huge willows grow- who had eagerly been watching for ing along their borders. Then came in this, rau in the water to his rescue and sight the village rejoicing in the name saved his life, for which act I duly reof Chia-chouei

mo, and last, but not warded him. least, the town of Fan-chan-pu. We The next halt we made at Houai-laispent the night at this place.

shien, a fairly large town sixteen hunStill traversing the country from dred and fifty-three feet above sea-level, south-west to north-east, and in a pour- and intersected by the highway from ing rain, we visited the villages of Pekin to Kalgan, and thence to Siberia. Si-kou-ying, Hao-kwei-ying, and Sang- A fine stone bridge is to be found just yein. Here the women, dressed in out of one of the gates. Three hours' their best clothes, stood watching us on journey brought us to Yu-ling-pu, and the doorsteps, which would have been another hour to Paol-chan. Here we quite a pretty sight, with their multi- came to numerous towers similar to color jupons and trousers, had the those described of the wall at Tung-aneffect not been partly spoiled by the tzu, but no signs of a wall could be horrible deformity of their feet squeezed discerned, which joined these towers, into microscopic shoes. I possess a though I am of opinion that in all probpair of these shoes as worn by a man- ability even these square structures darin's wife, and the length of them is were in olden days connected by an only three inches. Towards noon we earthen wall or possibly even a light reached Ya-lo-wan, on the banks of the stone wall. Many of these towers bear Hung-ho River, a miserable village on the appearance of having been well a minuscule hill of yellow earth. The used for fire-signalling. Not far from river had to be waded. A Chinaman these we got to the great wall at Cha

a beggar, I thought - volunteered to tao, where walls and towers are of take animals and men safely across for much larger dimensions than at any a sum of money, for he said there were other place I have seen in China. large holes in the river-bed, in which Chatao (fourteen hundred and seyour animals would have lost their foot- enty feet above sea-level) is situated on ing had we crossed by ourselves. Il the small semicircle described by the

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Great Wall between this and Cha-sau- time. Two or three were half buried ku, therefore making the wall double under a pile of large stones.

We between the two points, and forming a crossed over the bridge on to Chatouen, kind of a huge semi-circular enclosed a very festive place, where, though castle. The Great Wall of China, con- early in the morning, a diabolical represidering the centuries it has been up, sentation, with accompaniment of exmust have been wonderfully well built, cruciating music, was taking place in for, as yet, it is in marvellous repair, a large out-of-door theatre, and the with the exception of the roofs in the houses

decorated with paper towers that have fallen through.

flowers and lanterns. At this place the wall is enormously As we were going along the riverTride and imposing as it winds up the course it was amusing to watch the barren slopes of the nearer bills. The skilful way in which, with a small gate at Tziun-kuan was built in the band-net, the natives catch a tiny kind third moon of the first year of Tzin-tai, of fish, said to be excellent to eat. but a more beautiful one is that at Drawing nearer the Chinese capital Kin-youn-kuan, with its magnificent the habitations increased in number, stone carvings both under the archway as well as the villages and towns. The and outside.

dusty roadway was thronged

with Here I saw a strange sight. A num- people, camels, horses, mules, and ber of fat pigs that passed on the road donkeys, and now and then a palanwere clad in ueat little socks, so that quin conveyed a high official to or from their feet should not get sore in walk- the East great centre. Coolies, with ing long distances.

their huge, pointed, round hats, were Following the highway, still passing running with heavy loads to and fro, thousands of camels carrying tea to and everything was life and business. Siberia, with the monotonous sound of At sunset we entered Pekin by the their dingling bells, we came upon the north gate, thus ending my enjoyable di Pass of Nankao ; and from here, leav- outing to the great Siao-outai-shian. ing the highway and swinging sharply A. HENRY SAVAGE-LANDOR. to the north-east, we directed our steps to Che-san-ling, where we visited the Ming tombs.

The

one of Yuploh attracted mostly my admiration, and the Tumulus of Chang-su-uen, a simple | MR. RUSKIN AS A PRACTICAL TEACHER. but stately structure in masonry and The impractical nature of some of red lacquer, with a double roof similar Mr. Ruskin's teachings, especially in to a pagoda. The stone gateway, sur- political economy, his startling assermounted by two animals, was also as tions and vigorous protests against regraceful as it was simple. I must con- ceived opinions, and his apparently fess that so much had I heard about eccentric criticisms have, in times past, the avenue of the gigantic stone ani- been often the cause of regret to his mals and figures, that I was much dis- friends aud the subject of severe aniappointed when I saw them. They madversion of his opponents. Some did not appear to me to be gigantic at have even provoked ridicule and superall ; on the contrary, they seemed to cilious banter. It is therefore a pleasme very small, and some of the ani- ant surprise to find in the recently mals, like the elephant and the camel, published book of Mr. W. G. Collingwere, I am sure, smaller than life-size. wood, on the “Work and Life of John

We made our last halt for the night Ruskin,” that there was a remarkable at Chang-ping-tchu. In the morning, amount of good sense and practical as we left the town, we saw a number wisdom in the subject of this biogof bodies of men who had died of raphy. It is a work carefully and Starvation, and from the stench they cautiously prepared by one whose chief had apparently been left there some claim to our attention, apart from his

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From The Scottish Review.

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