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of peace, the chiefs of the tribe meet and refresh themselves after the fatigues of the hunt by feasting, and laughter, and play. The common people are not allowed to join, or, indeed, to play at this particular game at all. Sir Frederick Manson, the military secretary to the above-mentioned expedition, resided for a few weeks with the tribe after the conclusion of peace, and learnt the rudiments of the sport. He was so much impressed by its lively nature that he explained it to the passengers and crew of the ship in which he returned to England, and the name Ural Mountains is that which the sailors spontaneously produced from a pardonable confusion in their ungeographical minds between the great Russian range and the Orula tribe from whom the game had been brought. Whether the Royal Navy has been inoculated with it, or has suffered it to drop into forgetful ness, we are unable to say ; but an account of the principles of the game was found among Sir Frederick's papers after his death ; and it is by his nephew's permission that we publish it, in a form only slightly adapted to suit a more orderly society of Europeans.

To play at “Ural Mountains," appoint one of the party judge, and divide the rest into two sides, who must sit facing one another. Each side selects a captain. Each side should be not less than two in number, and not greater than six or eight. About four or five is the best number; and the sides need not be exactly equal. We will call them, for the sake of clearness, A, B, C, D, &c., and a, b, c, d, &c., A and a being the captains. The game is begun by the captains, one of whom accuses the other of some imaginary crime,—the more absurd the better. He is then subject to an examination from his antagonist as to the circumstances of the charge, his means of knowing it, the supposed motives, and anything in heaven or earth that may be considered to be in any way connected with it. To every question asked he must give a distinct answer. He is not allowed not to know; and, the more impossible and grandly

will be the result. As soon as the accused captain has asked as many questions as he thinks fit, another of the side takes it up and continues the examination, trying if possible to shake the evidence and obtain a self-contradiction ; and all in turn ask at least one question, and more if they wish. Then the accuser who is being examined passes on his part to the next in order, and he is in his turn examined. He is considered identical with his leader for purposes of examination, may be asked a second time the same questions, or others, and must give answers not inconsistent with those given before. Of course he may launch out into new, startling statements, which his leader must accept as part of the evidence. Then the next takes his part, and the next, and so throughout; the whole side being considered as one man, and answering about their knowledge of the crimes, and all questions that are asked, in the first person, and never contradicting themselves—or, it would be more proper to say, himself. If there is a discrepancy in the evidence given, the cross-examining side may call out that it is a “blot," and appeal to the judge, who allows one, two, or three, to their side, according to the grossness of the blunder ; the blundering person, however, may endeavour to explain away his inconsistency, and if he succeeds cleverly, the judge may mitigate his decision. The side under examination may not speak to one another while it lasts. A limit of time should be settled beforehand ; if there are four or five on a side, a quarter of an hour is about enough for the examination. When once everyone has asked at least one question, the fire of interrogatory becomes general, and any one of the accused may ask any one of the accusers any questions; only one, however, must speak at a time, and the captain commands his side in questions of prior right to cross-examine. When the time is up, the examination is reversed : the original accused captain has to declare an alibi, and state where he was, and what doing, at the time; or show in some way that

Lord Saltire and General Mainwaring in mind, it would be just as well if had a long interview, and a long consul. there had been no Lord Welter at all in tation. Lord Hainault and the General the story. witnessed his will. There were some Ravenshoe and its poor twelve thoulegacies to servants ; twenty thousand sand a-year begin to sink into insignifipounds to Miss Corby; ten thousand to cance, you see. But still we must attend John Marston ; fifty thousand pounds to it. How did Charles's death affect to Lady Ascot; and the rest, amount- Mackworth? Rather favourably. The ing in one way or another, to nearly property could not come into the hands four hundred thousand pounds, was of a Protestant now. William was a left to Lord Ascot (our old acquaint staunch Catholic, thougħ rebellious and ance, Lord Welter) and his heirs for ever. disagreeable. If anything happened to

There was another clause in the will, him, why, then there was Ellen to be carefully worded-carefully guarded produced. Things might have been about by every legal fence which could better, certainly, but they were decidedly be erected by law, and by money to improved by that young cub's death, and buy that law-to the effect that, if by the cessation of all search for the Charles should reappear, he was to marriage register. And so on. If you come into a fortune of eighty thousand care to waste time on it, you may think pounds, funded property.

it all through for yourselves, as did not Now please to mark this. Lord Ascot Father Mackworth. was informed by General Mainwaring And I'll tell you why. Father that, the death of Charles Ravenshoe Mackworth had had a stroke of parabeing determined on as being a fact, lysis, as men will have, who lead, as he Lord Saltire had made his will in his did, a life of worry and excitement, (Lord Ascot's) favour. I pray you to without taking proper nourishment; and remember this. Lord Ascot knew no he was lying, half idiotic, in the priest's particulars, but only that the will was tower at Ravenshoe. in his favour. If you do not keep this

To be continued.

THE URAL MOUNTAINS : A NEW PARLOUR GAME The Romans in the time of Horatius, or hitherto but partially known. Still, a in the time of Lord Macaulay, used to gap remains to be filled in the enteramuse themselves in the winter evenings tainments of an English evening; and by roasting chesnuts, telling stories from this article will be an attempt to fill it modern history, and broiling pieces of by the suggestion of a parlour game not kid's flesh. Our present civilization de- as yet popular in this country, and not putes part of these operations to the cook; depending on combinations of kings and it is not generally found that his and knaves for its success. toric narratives are sufficiently vivid in The “ Ural Mountains" is a game their interest to amuse ladies and gen- which has been played certainly for tlemen from dinner to bed-time con- more than a hundred years among a tinuously. So little is this the case, large tribe of Kafirs in South Africa. that in quest of the playful they weary The Orula race is one of the most intelthemselves to death with games of ver- ligent of the warlike nations situated at sification, or make believe to be pleased the back of the great Frang-Li chain in with the slow torture of “proverbs.” latitude 35° 31' S.; and they have long Games of cards are, of course, an un- been known as the originators of that failing resource; and some space has peculiar form of cross-bow which was so lately been given in these pages to the fatal to our troops in the expedition of of peace, the chiefs of the tribe meet will be the result. As soon as the and refresh themselves after the fatigues accused captain has asked as many of the hunt by feasting, and laughter, questions as he thinks fit, another of the and play. The common people are not side takes it up and continues the exallowed to join, or, indeed, to play at amination, trying if possible to shake this particular game at all. Sir Frede- the evidence and obtain a self-conrick Manson, the military secretary to tradiction ; and all in turn ask at least the above-mentioned expedition, resided one question, and more if they wish. for a few weeks with the tribe after the Then the accuser who is being examined conclusion of peace, and learnt the passes on his part to the next in order, rudiments of the sport. He was so and he is in his turn examined. He is much impressed by its lively nature considered identical with his leader for that he explained it to the passengers purposes of examination, may be asked and crew of the ship in which he re- a second time the same questions, or turned to England, and the name Ural others, and must give answers not inMountains is that which the sailors consistent with those given before. Of spontaneously produced from a pardon- course he may launch out into new, able confusion in their ungeographical startling statements, which his leader minds between the great Russian range must accept as part of the evidence. and the Orula tribe from whom the Then the next takes his part, and the game had been brought. Whether the next, and so throughout; the whole side Royal Navy has been inoculated with it, being considered as one man, and answeror has suffered it to drop into forgetful. ing about their knowledge of the crimes, ness, we are unable to say ; but an and all questions that are asked, in the account of the principles of the game first person, and never contradicting was found among Sir Frederick's papers themselves—or, it would be more proafter his death ; and it is by his per to say, himself. If there is a disnephew's permission that we publish crepancy in the evidence given, the it, in a form only slightly adapted to suit, cross-examining side may call out that a more orderly society of Europeans. it is a “blot," and appeal to the judge,

To play at “Ural Mountains," appoint who allows one, two, or three, to their one of the party judge, and divide the side, according to the grossness of the rest into two sides, who must sit facing blunder; the blundering person, howone another. Each side selects a captain ever, may endeavour to explain away Each side should be not less than two his inconsistency, and if he succeeds in number, and not greater than six or cleverly, the judge may mitigate his eight. About four or five is the best decision. The side under examination number; and the sides need not be may not speak to one another while it exactly equal. We will call them, for lasts. A limit of time should be settled the sake of clearness, A, B, C, D, &c., beforehand ; if there are four or five on and a, b, c, d, &c., A and a being the & side, a quarter of an hour is about captains. The game is begun by the enough for the examination. When captains, one of whom accuses the other once everyone has asked at least one of some imaginary crime,-the more question, the fire of interrogatory beabsurd the better. He is then subject comes general, and any one of the acto an examination from his antagonist as cused may ask any one of the accusers to the circumstances of the charge, his any questions ; only one, however, must means of knowing it, the supposed speak at a time, and the captain commotives, and anything in heaven or mands his side in questions of prior right earth that may be considered to be in to cross-examine. When the time is up, any way connected with it. To every the examination is reversed : the original question asked he must give a distinct accused captain has to declare an alibi, answer. He is not allowed not to know; and state where he was, and what doing, and, the more impossible and grandly at the time; or show in some way that

Lord Saltire and General Mainwaring had a long interview, and a long consul. tation. Lord Hainault and the General witnessed his will. There were some legacies to servants ; twenty thousand pounds to Miss Corby; ten thousand to John Marston ; fifty thousand pounds to Lady Ascot; and the rest, amount ing in one way or another, to nearly four hundred thousand pounds, was left to Lord Ascot (our old acquaint ance, Lord Welter) and his heirs for ever.

There was another clause in the will, carefully worded-carefully guarded about by every legal fence which could be erected by law, and by money to buy that law-to the effect that, if Charles should reappear, he was to come into a fortune of eighty thousand pounds, funded property.

Now please to mark this. Lord Ascot was informed by General Mainwaring that, the death of Charles Ravenshoe being determined on as being a fact, Lord Saltire had made his will in his (Lord Ascot's) favour. I pray you to remember this. Lord Ascot knew no particulars, but only that the will was in his favour. If you do not keep this

in mind, it would be just as well if there had been no Lord Welter at all in the story.

Ravenshoe and its poor twelve thousand a-year begin to sink into insignificance, you see. But still we must attend to it. How did Charles's death affect Mackworth? Rather favourably. The property could not come into the hands of a Protestant now. William was a staunch Catholic, though rebellious and disagreeable. If anything happened to him, why, then there was Ellen to be produced. Things might have been better, certainly, but they were decidedly improved by that young cub's death, and by the cessation of all search for the marriage register. And so on. If you care to waste time on it, you may think it all through for yourselves, as did not Father Mackworth.

And I'll tell you why. Father Mackworth had had a stroke of paralysis, as men will have, who lead, as he did, a life of worry and excitement, without taking proper nourishment; and he was lying, half idiotic, in the priest's tower at Ravenshoe.

To be continued.

THE URAL MOUNTAINS : A NEW PARLOUR GAME The Romans in the time of Horatius, or hitherto but partially known. Still, a in the time of Lord Macaulay, used to gap remains to be filled in the enteramuse themselves in the winter evenings tainments of an English evening; and by roasting chesnuts, telling stories from this article will be an attempt to fill it modern history, and broiling pieces of by the suggestion of a parlour game not kid's flesh. Our present civilization de- as yet popular in this country, and not putes part of these operations to the cook; depending on combinations of kings and it is not generally found that his and knaves for its success. toric narratives are sufficiently vivid in The “Ural Mountains is a game their interest to amuse ladies and gen- which has been played certainly for tlemen from dinner to bed-time con- more than a hundred years among a tinuously. So little is this the case, large tribe of Kafirs in South Africa that in quest of the playful they weary The Orula race is one of the most intelthemselves to death with games of ver- ligent of the warlike nations situated at sification, or make believe to be pleased the back of the great Frang-Li chain in with the slow torture of “proverbs." latitude 35° 31' S.; and they have long Games of cards are, of course, an un- been known as the originators of that failing resource; and some space has peculiar form of cross-bow which was so lately been given in these pages to the fatal to our troops in the expedition of of peace, the chiefs of the tribe meet will be the result. As soon as the and refresh themselves after the fatigues accused captain has asked as many of the hunt by feasting, and laughter, questions as he thinks fit, another of the and play. The common people are not side takes it up and continues the exallowed to join, or, indeed, to play at amination, trying if possible to shake this particular game at all. Sir Frede- the evidence and obtain a self-conrick Manson, the military secretary to tradiction ; and all in turn ask at least the above-mentioned expedition, resided one question, and more if they wish. for a few weeks with the tribe after the Then the accuser who is being examined conclusion of peace, and learnt the passes on his part to the next in order, rudiments of the sport. He was so and he is in his turn examined. He is much impressed by its lively nature considered identical with his leader for that he explained it to the passengers purposes of examination, may be asked and crew of the ship in which he re- a second time the same questions, or turned to England, and the name Ural others, and must give answers not inMountains is that which the sailors consistent with those given before. Of spontaneously produced from a pardon- course he may launch out into new, able confusion in their ungeographical startling statements, which his leader minds between the great Russian range must accept as part of the evidence. and the Orula tribe from whom the Then the next takes his part, and the game had been brought. Whether the next, and so throughout; the whole side Royal Navy has been inoculated with it, being considered as one man, and answeror has suffered it to drop into forgetful. ing about their knowledge of the crimes, ness, we are unable to say ; ut an and all questions that are asked, in the account of the principles of the game first person, and never contradicting was found among Sir Frederick's papers themselves—or, it would be more proafter his death; and it is by his per to say, himself. If there is a disnephew's permission that we publish crepancy in the evidence given, the it, in a form only slightly adapted to suit, cross-examining side may call out that a more orderly society of Europeans. it is a “blot," and appeal to the judge,

To play at “ Ural Mountains," appoint who allows one, two, or three, to their one of the party judge, and divide the side, according to the grossness of the rest into two sides, who must sit facing blunder; the blundering person, howone another. Each side selects a captain. ever, may endeavour to explain away Each side should be not less than two his inconsistency, and if he succeeds in number, and not greater than six or cleverly, the judge may mitigate his eight. About four or five is the best decision. The side under examination number; and the sides need not be may not speak to one another while it exactly equal. We will call them, for lasts. A limit of time should be settled the sake of clearness, A, B, C, D, &c., beforehand; if there are four or five on and a, b, c, d, &c., A and a being the a side, a quarter of an hour is about captains. The game is begun by the enough for the examination. When captains, one of whom accuses the other once everyone has asked at least one of some imaginary crime,—the more question, the fire of interrogatory beabsurd the better. He is then subject comes general, and any one of the acto an examination from his antagonist as cused may ask any one of the accusers to the circumstances of the charge, his any questions ; only one, however, must means of knowing it, the supposed speak at a time, and the captain commotives, and anything in heaven or mands his side in questions of prior right earth that may be considered to be in to cross-examine. When the time is up, any way connected with it. To every the examination is reversed : the original question asked he must give a distinct accused captain has to declare an alibi, answer. He is not allowed not to know; and state where he was, and what doing, and, the more impossible and grandly at the time; or show in some way that

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