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eleven works, and his four editions, “could prove that the prisoner was a upon public sympathy, and with the “ most determined beggar, and that she world for his oyster, and a morsel of “ had expressed her intention to chalk to open it with, could get on very “ continue begging, until she could inwell if we would but let him alone. “crease her capital so as to yield her

He might even perhaps have got on “ 11. per week, upon which she meant as well as the great Keziah Kadge her- “ to retire into private life. self. This name, which in the earlier “ Prisoner whined a good deal, and part of this notice has been applied to “ begged forgiveness, but did not utter a fictitious character, is, incredible as it “one promise to refrain from the life of seems, a real name, and is after all not " imposition she was leading." more difficult to believe in than the I am happy to say that this maghistory of the worthy lady who bore it. nificent impostor was merely detained This brief review of the present con- for twenty-one days in the House of dition and prospects of the begging in- Correction, giving her dividends time to terest, would be so incomplete without accumulate. Let us hope that she may the short and simple annals of Keziah speedily attain to the height of her Kadge, that I must ask leave to give ambition, and retire on a net income of them entire :

501. per annum. “ Keziah Kadge, a decent-looking Seriously speaking, it is a grave ques“ woman, attired as a widow, was tion, whether something might not be “ charged before Alderman Carter, with done to get our streets a little clearer “ begging under the following circum from beggars. Next year, hosts of 16 stances :

foreigners, and more especially of our " William Hewitt, one of the officers natural critics, the French, will be in “ of the Mendicity Society, said that he London, and it would be well that we “ saw the prisoner begging of several should have our streets in as creditable “ ladies, and, knowing her to be an old order as may be. Towards carrying out “ impostor, he took her into custody. this object, surely, one valuable step “ He found on her sevenpence in silver would be made if we began by bringing " and copper money, a silver watch, and to an immediate termination the careers "« porte-monnaie. She refused her of our younger practitioners in the art 56 name and address.

of begging. On the Surrey side of “Alderman Carter said, she could not Waterloo Bridge, and in only too many “ have been in such great distress if she other parts of London, there exist, as the “ had a silver watch in her possession. reader has doubtless often remarked,

“ Hewitt said, that this was one of whole hordes of young raggamuffins, " the worst cases of begging that he who endeavour to extort money from the " ever remembered; that the prisoner, so more good-natured and inconsiderate por“ far from being destitute, or in distress, tion of the community, by running along" actually had as much as 8001. or 9001. side of the omnibuses and cabs, which “ invested in the Bank of England, and pass by their beat, and turning summer" that she drew her dividends regularly, saults as near the wheels of the vehicles “ upon which she ought to maintain as may be done with security to that “ herself; but she was the greatest im safest of all things—a vagabond's life. “ postor in London, and had been in These youngsters are just entering life, “ custody before for the same offence. and are entering it by just one of the

“ The prisoner admitted that she had very worst thoroughfares with which " had three months' imprisonment from we are acquainted. Would it not be a " the court, but that was some years ago, real charity to them, as well as to the “ when her husband was alive. She world at large, to lay a merciful hand only got a shilling a day by her divi upon them, and turn them back before dends.

they advance further along that grievous appearance, and a foreigner, evidently of poblish abaout 'is affairs. Since then distinction. The following conversation I ’ave not prosper. I come to England. then takes place :

England, I say, is a great nation. The Man of genius. Mr. Jarvis, I believe. English man of letters is not jealous.

Foreigner of distinction. No, bai I see a French actor come over 'ere. no means—Charvet-Monsieur Jules He shows the English that they do not Charvet, of the Revue Ricaneuse.

knaow 'ow to act their own plays. I Man of genius. Oh, indeed [over will show them too, that they do not tures from some foreign publishers no knaow the meaning of their own leeteradoubt-well, I shall make my own ture. It is a great work this, but I terms), take a seat, pray Monsieur - most ’ave support whaile it is in progress. Monsieur

What am I to do? I turn naturally to Foreigner of distinction. Charvet. the forst men of the country in which You will ask, perhaps, what is my object I faind myself for help. I think in thus intruding upon you ?

immediate of the renown Mr. Startles Man of genius. Not at all, Monsieur to him I apply myself without reserve, Charvet.

without daout.. Foreigner of distinction. You are, I In short, M. Charvet is a beggar, and, believe, the author of the leettle work, when he pulls out a volume of his colentaitled “Startles upaun Sleep.” lected works from his pocket, and offers

Man of genius. I must own that I them to you for ten shillings, it is twenty am.

to one that, on the first occasion of such Foreigner of distinction. I am praoud a visit at any rate, you will return to and 'appy to make your acquaintance. your studies in the art of making both That work does you honour. It woot ends meet, finding both those ends be goot that it should be translate. farther apart by the distance of half-a

Man of genius (internally). Ah, ha! Sovereign than they were when you last

Foreigner of distinction. You are also considered the subject. the author of the “New Golconde, or The beggar, who is kind enough to Wealts at Weel.”

wait upon you at your own house, apMan of genius. The “New Golconda, pears under many forms. Sometimes, or Wealth at Will”-yes, indeed, I am. as in the case of our friend just men

Foreigner of distinction. Those works tioned, he is an author, sometimes an should be known by raights, wherever artist, sometimes an inventor, while not civilaisation ritches. I am indeed praoud unfrequently he comes to represent the and 'appy to know so distinguish a wants of others, when he is more difficolleague, for I too am man of letters, cult to resist than ever. as you shall know, no daout.

Beware of the French gentleman who, Man of genius. (Indistinct acquie addressing you in his native tongue in scence.)

the public streets, asks you to direct Foreigner of distinction. For the him to a street, the name of which he Revue Ricaneuse I have much written, has got inscribed upon a little scrap of my own books not succeeding, I write dirty paper. When he asks you for an savage revues of those of others. I get explanation of that direction, or requests together small news of personal kainds, you to inform him where the “ Société and poblish domestic matters belonging de Bienfaisance” is located, give him to distinguished families.

a wide berth, for he means begging, Man of genius. (Indistinct dis- and will bring the conversation round approval.)

to that interesting topic in no time. It Foreigner of distinction. But I'ave’ad is the common practice of this kind of ill-lock. I ’ave not socceed. An enemy mendicant to address himself to young of maine, jealous of me, ’ave threatened gentlemen, who appear to his serpentthe Revue Ricaneuse with law, if I was like wisdom as if they would be flat

Such youths cannot resist answering in such French as they have at command, and from the moment when they thus consent to enter into conversation, they are lost.

Beware, again, how your sympathies are enlisted in behalf of a little innocent looking boy who is crying bitterly over the fragments of a broken plate or jug, which has tumbled out of his hand He has been sent to fetch something which the plate or jug was intended to contain ; it has tumbled out of his hand and been broken into many atoms. The child is in an agony of grief, and dilates between his sobs upon the cruel consequences that will ensue when he returns home with the story of the broken plate. Now this would be all very well, and you would be doing quite right in contributing towards a new plate, if only you were quite sure that this was the first and only occasion on which our young friend has appeared with his knuckles screwed into his eyes, and a collection of fragments of the willow pattern at his feet. But what if all this which happens to-day at the corner of Baker-street, occurred yesterday opposite the Foundling, and will be repeated till further notice every day next week in divers parts of the metropolis ?

This last-mentioned little mendicant is very difficult to harden oneself against. The same may be said of the woful elderly beggar, who addresses you only for a moment, on a wet night, just turning half round as you pass, and uttering one or two spiritless and broken words, abandoning his suit directly if it is not encouraged. Are there any who read these words, who have gone back a hundred or two of yards to relieve, not so much the beggar himself, as that more importunate mendicant who was pulling and dragging at the softer fibres of their hearts, pleading the cause of that drenched and lonely old man ? Somehow I cannot class this sort of beggar with the rest, nor steel myself entirely against his claims.

But, in revenge, against the spouting beggar 1 can harden myself with ease. This is he who, advancing with slow

street, holding a baby in his arms, and followed by a woman and other children, gives out his wrongs to the public ear in a loud and oratorical manner, beginning, “Hi ham a pore weaver,". and interspersing his statement with many asides of a threatening character, addressed in a husky whisper to his wife and children. This group will occasionally awaken the echoes of Charlottestreet, Fitzroy-square, which is a favourite beggar-preserve, with the strain of the Old Hundredth, which is commonly interrupted with even more clinkings of halfpence on the pavement, thrown from upper windows, than is elicited by the weaver's narration of his own wrongs and sufferings. This is the same man who, when unable to afford the hire of a wife and family for choral psalm-singing and spouting purposes, lurks about our suburbs and lies in wait for ladies who are obliged to go out alone while their husbands are at business, and makes their walk so unpleasant to them with half-threatening, halfwhining importunities, that they are glad enough to give him an alms to be rid of him. He is an intimate ally too of the man who does a mackerel, a moonlight, a mutton chop, and a head from Carlo Dolci on the pavement in crayons, and is well known to the sailor with no legs, who unrolls a painting of a shipwreck and stretches it out by his side, close to that blank-wall on the wrong side of Oxford-street, which communicates by gates with Hanover-square.

From these particular and distinct classifications of the different tribes of beggars, we turn naturally to a consideration of the subject in its broader and more general aspects.

In England, a beggar is always religious, and nearly always clean. Besides the hymns which we have seen that our Indian beggar is fond of retailing, there are little tracts which such personages commonly have on sale, and which, purporting to interest you in a dramatic story, soon make a digression into more theological matters, revealing how wonderfully a certain innocent and how he prospered afterwards in a certain colony, and acquired a territory, and a house, and cattle and horses, and how he was taken into the confidence of the Missionaries, and became Treasurer to the Evening School Fund, and was interested with all sorts of other Funds as well, because he had said that “um “ poor Sambo nebber cared for gold “ and silver, only lub im church and school ;” at which point history drops the curtain, the historian being, doubtless, afraid of injuring his effect, which, indeed, might possibly have been done by dwelling any longer on Sambo's career.

The statements which Sambo and others chalk upon the pavement, or wear round their necks, are commonly interspersed with religious matter, and we have seen that, when Keziah Kadge runs by your side round the crescent, at the top of Portland-place, she is wont to utter words of sacred meaning, and to make professions of religion which cause one to shudder, and hasten more than ever out of ear-shot of such grievous mockery.

Then, as to cleanliness. The beggar who understands his business is always clean. It is not so abroad; sympathy in foreign climes is rather awakened than otherwise by dirt. The brisk movement of a flea attracts attention to the insect's proprietor, and relief may follow; a clean shirt on a beggar would not be understood, and it might turn out, if he wore one, that his linen was in better order than that of the gentleman whom he supplicates for alms. With us it is different. The English beggar thinks that, if he turns out clean, it will be thought that, at any rate, he is doing all he can, and that he is putting a good face upon his poverty, and making the best of it. I believe that there are no aprons known in the civilized world of such extraordinary cleanliness as those worn by Keziah Kadge, and I also believe that there is an especial manufactory of coarse linen carried on expressly with a view to the shirt-fronts of our silent beggars, they being of a

which has something unhallowed and altogether inexplicable about it.

All this tells with the British public. Indeed, the peculiar kind of linen just described, and especially when it is set in, or surrounded by, a suit of seedy black, is well-nigh irresistible. The fact is, that the irresistible class of beggars is a very large one, and it is astonishing how long an adroit and practised mendicant will keep his head above water. The Rev. Elliott Hadlow, for instance, who has recently been much harassed by the mendicity offcers, has been upwards of twenty years" in the profession.” This ill-used personage belonged to the noble order of the pavement-chalkers. The autobiographical notice with which he was wont to ornament the foot-way, was a short one. “I am,” he used to write " a decayed “schoolmaster, the author of eleven “works, the last of which went through "a fourth edition.” Here was an appeal, which was not likely to be inefficacious. What a delightful sensation for a passing schoolboy to bestow his penny, and feel that he was actually“ tipping” a schoolmaster! What a glorious vengeance for the literary character whose works had never attained to a second, or thirdnot to say a first edition, to go and insult this successful author, this public favourite, with a present of a couple of new bronze half-pennies! How villanous that this interesting person's career should be cut short because an officer of the Mendicity Society, with no regard for literature, chooses to denounce the “ decayed schoolmaster” as a wellknown impostor, with whose history he (the officer) had been acquainted for twenty-one years. The author of the “eleven works,” is on this occasion very candid, acknowledges that “he has been “in the habit of begging, and that he “has been previously brought before a “magistrate for that offence, and that “ since that time he has managed to "secure a pension of nineteen shillings “and fourpence per month.” This, of course, will not supply him with so many luxuries as it is natural he should

eleven works, and his four editions, “could prove that the prisoner was a upon public sympathy, and with the “most determined beggar, and that she world for his oyster, and a morsel of “had expressed her intention to chalk to open it with, could get on very “continue begging, until she could in well if we would but let him alone. “crease her capital so as to yield her

He might even perhaps have got on “ 11. per week, upon which she meant as well as the great Keziah Kadge her- “ to retire into private life. self. This name, which in the earlier “ Prisoner whined a good deal, and part of this notice has been applied to “ begged forgiveness, but did not utter a fictitious character, is, incredible as it “one promise to refrain from the life of seems, a real name, and is after all not " imposition she was leading." more difficult to believe in than the I am happy to say that this maghistory of the worthy lady who bore it. nificent impostor was merely detained This brief review of the present con- for twenty-one days in the House of dition and prospects of the begging in- Correction, giving her dividends time to terest, would be so incomplete without accumulate. Let us hope that she may the short and simple annals of Keziah speedily attain to the height of her Kadge, that I must ask leave to give ambition, and retire on a net income of them entire :

501. per annum. “ Keziah Kadge, a decent-looking Seriously speaking, it is a grave ques“ woman, attired as a widow, was tion, whether something might not be “ charged before Alderman Carter, with done to get our streets a little clearer “ begging under the following circum from beggars. Next year, hosts of “ stances :

foreigners, and more especially of our “ William Hewitt, one of the officers natural critics, the French, will be in “ of the Mendicity Society, said that he London, and it would be well that we “ saw the prisoner begging of several should have our streets in as creditable “ ladies, and, knowing her to be an old order as may be. Towards carrying out “ impostor, he took her into custody. this object, surely, one valuable step “ He found on her sevenpence in silver would be made if we began by bringing “ and copper money, a silver watch, and to an immediate termination the careers “a porte-monnaie. She refused her of our younger practitioners in the art “ name and address.

of begging. On the Surrey side of “Alderman Carter said, she could not Waterloo Bridge, and in only too many “ have been in such great distress if she other parts of London, there exist, as the “ had a silver watch in her possession. reader has doubtless often remarked,

“ Hewitt said, that this was one of whole hordes of young raggamuffins, “ the worst cases of begging that he who endeavour to extort money from the “ ever remembered; that the prisoner, so more good-natured and inconsiderate por“ far from being destitute, or in distress, tion of the community, by running along“ actually had as much as 8001. or 9001. side of the omnibuses and cabs, which “ invested in the Bank of England, and pass by their beat, and turning summer“ that she drew her dividends regularly, saults as near the wheels of the vehicles “ upon which she ought to maintain as may be done with security to that “ herself ; but she was the greatest im- safest of all things—a vagabond's life. “ postor in London, and had been in These youngsters are just entering life, “ custody before for the same offence. and are entering it by just one of the

“ The prisoner admitted that she had very worst thoroughfares with which “ had three months' imprisonment from we are acquainted. Would it not be a “ the court, but that was some years ago, real charity to them, as well as to the “ when her husband was alive. She world at large, to lay a merciful hand “ only got a shilling a day by her divi- upon them, and turn them back before " dends.

they advance further along that grievous

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