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land”—to him of fairer plumage and dered by Tannahill, and repeated the mellower note than those of any other verses, land-and finally requesting the favour

Yon mossy rosebud doon the browe of an interview. “I would fain shake

Just opening fresh and bonnie, “hands with you, and thank you for

Blinks sweet aneath the hazel bough,

Though scarcely seen by ony. “ the many hours of pleasure,” &c. &c.

Sae sweet amang her native hills Wilson, with characteristic frankness,

Obscurely blooms my Jeanie, acceded to the request, and fixed day

Mair fair and gay than rosy May, and hour. A manuscript book now

The lass o' Arrenteenie. before me, full of verses and scraps of The Professor agreed that it was letters, and with withered wild flowers, beautifully expressed, and at least equal gathered years ago at Castlemilk and to Wordsworth's. “It will be sung, Kenmure Wood, inserted between the whereas the other will not," writes leaves, contains a copious account of the Macdonald sturdily. So for an hour meeting and the conversation. After and a half the talk flowed on of beast, describing the half-terrified pause at the and bird, and poet; and then the street-door, his alarming palpitation on stranger retired, “with a heart running ascending the stair, the manuscript book “over with gratitude, pride, and love to goes on : “ Wilson was in his workshop “the greatest mind I have ever met, or « among his books, which were scattered “in all likelihood ever will meet in this " about in all directions, their bindings “world.” Never was one man so utterly

for the most part scuffed,' and bearing bound to another's chariot-wheels; and “ marks of having 'seen service.' He the whole matter is creditable alike to “ sat in his easy chair, with a good stout captive and enslaver. “ cudgel in his hand. Although the yel- Mr. Macdonald married a second “ low hair, now silvered and thinned by time; and in the companionship of the “ time, hung carelessly over his neck, excellent woman who now survives “his manly features and high dome- him, and with boys and girls growing “ like head would have pointed out at up around his fireside, he enjoyed much “ once the mighty Christopher. He is domestic happiness. During these years “ becoming somewhat corpulent; and his pen was busy with song and ballad. “ when he threw himself back in his The greater proportion of these pieces “ chair, with one leg resting on the saw the light in the columns of the “ other, he brought Shakespeare's worthy Glasgow Citizen, then, as now, con“ Sir John forcibly to my mind.” Wil. ducted by Mr. James Hedderwick, an son read over the poem, making com- accomplished journalist and poet of no ments as he went; that done, the con- mean order. The casual connexion versation became strictly ornithological of contributor and editor ripened into -the mottled breast of the thrush, the friendship, and in 1849 Mr. Macbeauty of the water ouzel, as it jerks donald was permanently engaged as and twitters on the lichened stones be- Mr. Hedderwick's sub-editor. He was neath the waterfall, the song of the red- now occupied in congenial tasks, and breast on grey autumn mornings, when a perfect gush of song followed this the woods are shedding their yellow accession of leisure and opportunity. leaves, were discussed, and are reported Sunshine and the scent of flowers seemed at very considerable length. Then the to have stolen into the weekly columns. talk diverged to Wordsworth. Wilson You “smelt the meadow” in casual quoted the strain to Lucy

paragraph and editorial leader. His best

verses were written at this time ; and the She dwelt among untrodden ways. subjoined extract from one, “Wee Anne

O' Auchineden," with the earthy scent Macdonald, zealous for the honour of of mortality piercing through its sunScottish minstrelsy, conceived that the shine, will exhibit of what tender stuff

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22

Hugh Macdonald.
Thy mother's cheek was wet and pale,
And aft in sighs her words would fail,

His heart clung to every ruin in the
When in mine ear she breathed thy tale,

neighbourhood like the shrouding ivy; Wee Anne o' Auchineden.

he was deeply learned in epitaphs, and That low sweet voice through many a year,

spent many a sunny hour in village If life is mine, shall haunt my ear,

churchyards, extracting sweet and bitter Which pictured thee with smile and tear,

thoughts from the half-obliterated inWee Anne o' Auchineden.

scriptions. Jaques, Izaak Walton, and Lone was thy hame upon the moor,

Old Mortality rolled into one, he knew Mang dark brown heaths and mountains hoar: Lanarkshire, Renfrewshire, and Ayrshire Thou wert a sunbeam at the door,

by heart. Keenly sensible to natural Wee Anne o' Auchineden,

beauty, and full of antiquarian know-
Blue curling reek on the breeze afloat,

ledge, and in possession of a prose style
Quiet hovered abune the snaw-white cot, singularly quaint, picturesque, and
And strange wild-birds of eeriest note
Swept ever o'er Auchineden.

humorous, he began week by week in

the columns of the Citizen the publica-
Sweet-scented nurslings o' sun and dew

tion of his “Rambles around Glasgow."
In the bosky faulds o' the burn that grew,
Were the only mates thy bairnhood knew,

These sketches were read with avidity,
Wee Anne o' Auchineden.

and Calebi became in Glasgow a well-
But the swallow biggit aneath the eaves,

known name. City people were astoAnd the bonnie lock shilfa amang the leaves

nished to find the country lying beAft lilted to thee in the silent eves,

yond the smoke was far from prosaic· Wee Anne o' Auchineden.

that it had its traditions, its antiquities, And thou wert ta'en frae this world o' tears,

its historical associations, and glens and
Unstained by the sorrow or sin o' years; waterfalls worthy of special excursions.
Thy voice is now in the angels' ears,

These sketches were afterwards collected,
Wee Anne o' Auchineden.

and in their separate and more con-
The primrose glints on the spring's return, venient form ran through two editions.
The merle sings blithe to the dancing burn: No sooner were the “Rambles” com-
But there's ae sweet flower we aye shall mourn, pleted than Caleb proiected a new series
Wee Anne o' Auchineden.

of sketches, entitled “Days at the Coast,"
There is surely something very exqui- sketches which also appeared in the
site in the sad fluctuating music of these columns of a weekly newspaper. Mr.
verses-irregular, like the footsteps of Macdonald's best writing is to be found
one who cannot see his way for tears. in this book; several of the descriptive

Still more in prose than in verse did passages are really notable in their way. Mr. Macdonald at this period direct his As we read, the white Firth of Clyde energies; and he was happy enough to glitters before us, with snowy villages encounter a subject exactly suited to his sitting on the green shores ; Bute and powers and mental peculiarities. He was the twin Cumbraes asleep in sunshine : the most uncosmopolitan of mortals. and, beyond, a stream of lustrous an He had the strongest local attachments. silvery vapour melting on the gris) In his eyes Scotland was the fairest Arran peaks. The publication of the -nrtion of the planet, Glasgow the sketches raised the reputation of th tinn of Scotland, and Bridge- author; and, like the others, they "the city in which he ceived the honour of collection ap

Pevelt—the separate issue. But little more ha

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nfirm step, and with an eye
pst its interest and its lustre.
never did betray the heart that
jer ;” and when the spring-time
Lacdonald, remembering all her
sweetness, journeyed for the last

Castlemilk to see the snowdrops,
ere of all their haunts in the west
come earliest and linger latest. It
a dying visit, an eternal farewell.
y were gathered to their graves to-

BY COVENTRY PATMORE.
V.—MARY CHURCHILL TO THE DEAN.

FATHER, you bid me once more weigh
This Offer, ere I answer, nay.
Charles does me honour; but 'twere vain
To reconsider now again,
And so to doubt the clear-shown truth
I sought for, and received, when youth,
And vanity, and one whose love
Was lovely, woo'd me to remove
From Heav'n my heart's infixed root.

'Tis easiest to be absolute;
And I reject the name of Bride
From no conceit of saintly pride,
But dreading my infirmity,
And ignorance of how to be
Faithful, at once, to the heavenly life,
And the fond duties of a wife.
I narrow am, and want the art
To love two things with all my heart.
Occupied wholly in His search
Who, in the mysteries of the Church,
Returns, and calls them Clouds of Heaven,
I tread a road straight, hard, and even;
But fear to wander all confused,
By two-fold fealty abused.
I either should the one forget,
Or scantly pay the other's debt;
For still it seems to me I make
Love vain by adding for His sake;"
Nay, at the very thought my breast
Is fill'd with anguish of unrest !

You bade me, Father, count the cost.
I have! and all that must be lost
I feel as only women can.

liye the Idol of some man,

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Thy spother's check was wet and pale,

His heart elung to every ruin in the And aft in sighs ber words would fail,

neighbourhood like the shrouding ivy; When in spite ear sbe breathed thy tale, Wee Ame o Auchipeden.

he was deeply learned in epitaphs, and That low sweet voice through many a year,

spent many a sunny hour in village II lite ir muide, shall haunt my ear,

churchyards, extracting sweet and bitter Which pictured thee with smile and tear,

thoughts from the half-obliterated inWee Asane o' Auchineden.

scriptions. Jaques, Izaak Walton, and Lone was thy bame upon the moor,

Old Mortality rolled into one, he knew Mang dark brown heaths and mountains hoar: Lanarkshire, Renfrewshire, and Ayrshire Thou wert a sunbeam at the door,

by heart. Keenly sensible to natural Wee Anne o' Auchineden,

beauty, and full of antiquarian knowBlue curling reek on the breeze afloat,

ledge, and in possession of a prose style Quiet bovered abune the saw-white cot,

singularly quaint, picturesque, and And strange wild-birds of eeriest note

humorous, he began week by week in Swept ever o'er Auchineden

the columns of the Citizen the publicaSweetscented nurslings o' eup and dew

tion of his “Rambles around Glasgow.” In the bosky fauldr o the burn that grew,

These sketches were read with avidity, Were the only mates thy bairnhood knew, Wee Apne o' Auchineden.

and Calebi became in Glasgow a well

known name. City people were astoBut the swallow biggit aneath the eaves, And the bonpie lock whilfa amang the leaves

nished to find the country lying beAft lilted to thee in the silent eves,

yond the smoke was far from prosaicWee Anne o' Auchineden.

that it had its traditions, its antiquities And thou wert ta'en frae this world o' tears,

its historical associations, and glens and Unstained by the sorrow or sin o' years; waterfalls worthy of special excursions Thy voice is now in the angels' ears,

These sketches were afterwards collected Wee Anne o' Auchineden.

and in their separate and more con The primrose glinta on the spring's return, venient form ran through two editions The merle singu blithe to the dancing burn:

No sooner were the “ Rambles” com But there's ae sweet flower we aye shall mourn, Wee Anne o' Auchineden.

pleted than Caleb projected a new serie

of sketches, entitled “Days at the Coast, There is surely something very exqui- sketches which also appeared in tł site in the sad fluctuating music of these columns of a weekly newspaper. M verses-irregular, like the footsteps of Macdonald's best writing is to be four one who cannot see his way for tears. in this book ; several of the descripti

Still more in prose than in verse did passages are really notable in their wa Mr. Macdonald at this period direct his As we read, the white Firth of Cly energies ; and he was happy enough to glitters before us, with snowy villag encounter a subject exactly suited to his sitting on the green shores ; Bute a powers and mental peculiarities. He was the twin Cumbraes asleep in sunshir the most uncosmopolitan of mortals. and, beyond, a stream of lustrous a He had the strongest local attachments. silvery vapour melting on the gri In his eyes Scotland was the fairest Arran peaks. The publication of th portion of the planet, Glasgow the sketches raised the reputation of tł fairest portion of Scotland, and Bridge author ; and, like the others, they ton--the district of the city in which he ceived the honour of collection an was born and in which he dwelt—the separate issue. But little more ha fairest portion of Glasgow. He would be said concerning Mr. Macdona have shrieked like a mandrake at up- literary activity. The early afterr rootal. He never would pass a night was already setting in. During the away from home. But he was a pas eighteen months of his life, he was sionate lover of nature ; and the snow gaged on one of the Glasgow mor drop called him out of the smoke to journals; and, when in its column Castlemilk, the sleepy lucken-gowan to rambled as of yore, it was with a

paratively infirm step, and with an eye
that had lost its interest and its lustre
“ Nature never did betray the heart that
* loved her;" and when the spring-time
came, Macdonald, remembering all her
former sweetness, journeyed for the last
time to Castlemilk to see the snowdrops
for there of all their haunts in the west
they come earliest and linger latest It
was a dying visit, an eternal farewell.
They were gathered to their graves to

gether. He was neither a great man nor a great poet in the ordinary senses of these terms; but since his removal there are perhaps some half-dozen per sons in the world who feel that the “ strange superthuous glory of the sum“mer air lacks something, and that, because an ear and an eye are gone, the colour of the flower is duller, the song of the bind loss sweet, than it was in a time they can remember.

THE VICTORIES OF LOVE

BY COVENTRY PATNORE,

V.—MARY CHURCHILL TO THE DEAN.

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FATHER, you bid me once more weigh
This Offer, ere I answer, nay.
Charles does me honour; but 'twere vain
To reconsider now again,
And so to doubt the clear-shown truth
I sought for, and received, when youth,
And vanity, and one whose love
Was lovely, woo'd me emove
From Heav'n my hea ixed root.

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