The Works of Alexander Pope, 7. kötet

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From Mr Wycherley
43
More concerning corrections of the Poems
44
From Mr Wycherley after his illness
46
From Mr Wycherley
48
From Mr Wycherley Concerning the Miscella nies and the Critics
49
Concerning Miscellanies and the danger of young Poets
51
From Mr Wycherley
53
From Mr Wycherley
54
From Mr Wycherley His desire of his company and request to proceed in correcting his Papers
56
More about the Poems
58
Corrections sent
59
From Mr Wycherley In answer to the account of the state of his Papers
61
The last advice about his Papers to turn them into select Maxims and Reflections which Mr Wych erley agreed to and begun before his death
63
LETTER Page
65
From Mr Walsh On the same subjects
71
LETTERS TO AND FROM MR CROMWELL
87
Of his Translation of the First Book of Statius
93
Criticisms on Statius
100
The use of poetical studies A panegyric upon
109
LETTER Page XI Of the taste of country gentlemen
113
On the severity of criticism
115
After an illness The obscurity of a country life
117
On the same subjects Concerning Rondeaus
120
From Mr Cromwell On Priams Speech to Pyr rhus in Virgil
124
Answer to the Same
125
Criticisms about an Elegy of Ovid
127
On sickness and disappointment
129
On the same subject
134
From Mr Cromwell On a passage in Lucan
137
Answer to the former with another criticism on Lucan
138
From Mr Cromwell On the same subject
141
On the Translations of Ovid
142
From Mr Cromwell On Lucan
144
Observations on Crashaws Poems
146
Concerning laughter
149
From Mr Cromwell
151
Of the study of poetry Mr Wycherley etc
153
From Mr Cromwell
155
LETTERS TO SEVERAL LADIES I To a Lady from Bath
159
LETTER Page VII To the Same
168
To the Same
170
To the Same
172
To the Same
173
To Mrs on the Earl of Oxfords behaviour Apprehensions of commotion Army in Hyde Park
178
Praise of a country life Concern for the separa tion of friends The comforts of integrity and independency
179
Reflections on absence
181
Excursion to Hampton Court
183
Description of a Journey to Oxford and manner of life there
186
Of a Ladys sickness
188
Witty letters undervalued in comparison of sincere Ones
189
On the same subject to the Hon Mrs H
191
To an unfortunate Lady
192
To a Lady abroad
194
The Answer
239
LETTERS TO AND FROM MR STEELE MR ADDISON
247
LETTER Page III Of sickness and dying young
250
On the Emperor Adrians Verses on his death bed
253
From Mr Steele
255
To Mr Steele Of the Emperor Adrian
257
From Mr Steele
258
Ode The Dying Christian to his Soul ibid To Mr Addison On Denniss Remarks on Cato
259
From Mr Addison Concerning Mr Popes Translation of Homer
261
From Mr Addison On the same
264
To Mr Addison Against Partyspirit
265
Of the freedom of a friend the incongruity of man and the vanity of the world
267
Party animosity
270
Concerning some misunderstandings
273
To the Hon concerning Mr Addison Philipss Calumny and Mr Gays Pastorals
277
The vanity of Poetical Fame serious thoughts
278
Concerning the Translation of Homer
280
To Mr Jervas of the same
283
To the Same on the equal and easy terms of friendship
284
Mr Jervas to Mr Pope concerning Mr Addison
286
The Answer
287
Mr Pope to the Earl of Halifax
290
Dr Parnelle Dr Berkley Mr Gay and Dr Arbuthnot concerning Mr Popes Homer
291
To the Hon James Craggs Esq on the same
294
To Mr Congreve Of sincerity the scurrilities of abusive Critics what ought to be the temper of an Author
297
To the Same of the Farce called the Whatdye call it
301
From the Reverend Dean Berkeley to Mr Pope
305
To the Same
312
From Dean Berkeley A Description of the Island
319
VOL VII
327
To the Duke of Buckingham in answer to his Let
333
From the Duke of Buckingham to Mr Pope
340
Answer to the former
347
LETTER Page XVI To Dr Arbuthnot on his return from France and on the calumnies about the Odyssey
352
To Robert Earl of Oxford
353
The Earl of Oxfords Answer
355
To Mr Holdsworth recommending Mr Harte of St Marys Hall to the Poetry Professorship in Oxford
356
To Mr Hughes with Proposals for Homer
357
t To the Same
358
To the Same
360
4To the Same e ibid XXIV To the Same
361
tTo Mr Jabez Hughes on the death of his Bro ther
362
F To Mr Duncombe
363
4To the Same
364
tTo the Same
365
To Mr Pitt Translator of Vida and Virgil
366
4From Mr J Spence to the Rev Mr Pitt Rector of Pimperne near Blandford Dorsetshire on Mr Popes opinion of Pitts Virgil
367
To Mr Richardson Mr Popes opinion of Bath
369
4Mr Lyttelton to Lord Bolingbroke
370
4Lord Bolingbrokes Answer
372
Hord Bolingbroke to Mr Mallet
373
HIDr Warburton to Mr Andrew Millar the Book seller on Mallets publishing the Works of Bolingbroke
374

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106. oldal - Happy the man. whose wish and care A few paternal acres bound. Content to breathe his native air. In his own ground Whose herds with milk, whose fields with bread, Whose flocks supply him with attire. Whose trees in summer yield him shade. In winter fire.
306. oldal - The Muse, disgusted at an age and clime Barren of every glorious theme. In distant lands now waits a better time Producing subjects worthy fame : In happy climes where from the genial sun And virgin earth such scenes ensue, The force of art by nature seems outdone, And fancied beauties by the true : In happy climes the seat of innocence, Where nature guides and virtue rules, Where men shall not impose for truth and sense The pedantry of courts and schools...
259. oldal - Hark! they whisper; Angels say, Sister Spirit, come away. What is this absorbs me quite? Steals my senses, shuts my sight, Drowns my spirits, draws my breath?
259. oldal - Hark, they whisper ; angels say, " Sister spirit, come away ! " What is this absorbs me quite, Steals my senses, shuts my sight, Drowns my...
259. oldal - ... the world recedes it disappears heaven opens on my eyes my ears with sounds seraphic ring lend lend your wings i mount i fly o grave where is thy victory o death where is thy sting.
306. oldal - There shall be sung another golden Age, The rise of Empire and of Arts, The Good and Great inspiring epic Rage, The wisest Heads and noblest Hearts. Not such as Europe breeds in her decay; Such as she bred when fresh and young, When heav'nly Flame did animate her Clay, By future Poets shall be sung.
69. oldal - People seek for what they call wit on all subjects and in all places, not considering that Nature loves truth so well that it hardly ever admits of flourishing. Conceit is to Nature what paint is to beauty; it is not only needless, but impairs what it would improve.
250. oldal - I would flatter myself into a good opinion of my own way of living : Plutarch just now told me, that it is in human life as in a game at tables...
77. oldal - It is not enough that nothing offends the Ear, but a good Poet will adapt the very Sounds, as well as Words, to the things he treats of. So that there is (if one may express it so) a Style of Sound. As in describing a gliding Stream, the Numbers shou'd run easy and flowing; in describing a rough Torrent or Deluge, sonorous and swelling, and so of the rest.
269. oldal - outsteps the modesty of nature/' nor raises merriment or wonder by the violation of truth. His figures neither divert by distortion nor amaze by aggravation. He copies life with so much fidelity that he can be hardly...

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