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LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

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BARN AT BROADWELL, NEAR STOW-ON-THE-WOLD.

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AT BROADWELL, NEAR STOW.
HOUSE IN MARKET SQUARE, STOW-ON-THE-WOLD

146 152 155 157 160 166

UPPER SWELL MANOR

MANOR HOUSE, UPPER SLAUGHTER .
ICOMB CHURCH

NORMAN DOORWAY AT GUITING POWER

GREVEL'S HOUSE, CHIPPING CAMPDEN .

A COURTYARD AT CHIPPING CAMPDEN

NORMAN DOORWAY AT BROAD CAMPDEN

CHURCH STREET, CHIPPING CAMPDEN

170 172 183 189 191 193 195 204 207 209 213 219

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EBRINGTON.
THE VALE OF EVESHAM, FROM HIDCOTE BOYCE
COTTAGES AT WESTON SU BEDGE.

SAINTBURY

221

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223 225 227 229 234 236 244 246 247 250 264 266 269 276 279 284

GLOUCESTER STREET, WINCHCOMBE
SUDELEY CASTLE

NORTH CERNEY CHURCH

DOVECOT AT DAGLINGWORTH.
DUNTESBOURNE ROUS CHURCH

CHEDWORTH CHURCH

CASSEY COMPTON

NORTHLEACH CHURCH

FAIRFORD CHURCH

308

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328

SAPERTON

DANEWAY HOUSE

CALMSDEN. THE VILLAGE CROSS
ST. JOHN'S HOSPITAL, CIRENCESTER
CIRENCESTER CHURCH

331 333 335 342 353 361 370 373

SHIPTON COURT BEFORE THE RECENT RESTORATION

BURFORD CHURCH

ASTHALL.

MINSTER LOVEL.

DOVECOT

MAPS

OXFORD

SOUTH-EAST COTSWOLDS

393 395 397 399

NORTH COTSWOLDS

SOUTH-WEST COTSWOLDS

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CHAPTER I
Emp. “Trust me, Plantagenet, these Oxford schools

Are richly seated near the river-side :
The mountains full of fat and fallow deer,
The battling pastures lade with kine and flocks,
The town gorgeous with high-built colleges,
And scholars seemly in their grave attire,
Learned in searching principles of art.”

-GREENE, Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay. The Oxford Almanack for the year 1808 displays a view by Turner, in which the London coach is seen descending Headington Hill. Of all the approaches to Oxford this was the most striking, but the prospect which Turner has sketched, and on which the gaze of his outside passengers is fixed, has long

B

2

THE CHILTERNS

CHAP.

been concealed by the enclosures and plantations of Headington Hill Hall. In the foreground are the few picturesque houses which then formed the suburb of St. Clement's; in the middle distance are the groves of Magdalen, from the centre of which rise the New Buildings, then some fifty years old, and still the finest thing of its kind in Oxford ; and on the left are seen the glorious tower and the bridge. Further still to the left rise the towers of Merton and of Christ Church, while on the right predominant are the spires of All Saints' and St. Mary's, and the great dome of the Radcliffe Library. In the background the scene is closed by the long line of the green-muffled Cumnor hills and the dark wooded heights of Wytham.

Such would have been the picture spread before us had we been journeying down the steep descent of Headington Hill in 1808, and we should have reached our comfortable quarters at the Angel or the Mitre without encountering anything to break the spell of first impressions. Nor were these impressions the less enchanting from the fact that they had surpassed any mental picture of the scene which we had been trying to form. For this the long and leisurely journey from London had given us ample time. As the coach crawled down the rugged slope of the Chilterns, and as the coachman strove to make his eight or nine miles an hour across the plain which divides the chalk range from the heights of Shotover, there was nothing but the sign-posts to indicate our approach to the enchanted city of our imagination : anticipation had long to be nursed, curiosity long held in suspense, until at a turn of the road, hardly more than a mile away, the magic vision was suddenly revealed.

All this is altered now: you take your seat in the express at Paddington, and have hardly scanned your newspaper through, when you are gliding past reservoirs and gas works into Oxford station. If the stranger is resolute enough to close his eyes at Kennington Island and refuse to open them till his cab deposits him at his hotel, he will be the happier

Then let him ascend the roof of the Radcliffe, or,

man.

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