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For, bear ourselves as even as we can,
The king will always think him in our debt;
And think we think ourselves unsatisfied,
Till he hath found a time to pay us home.
And see already, how he doth begin
To make us strangers to his looks of love.
Hot. He does, he does ; we'll be reveng'd on

him.
Wor. Cousin, farewell :- No further

go

in this, Than I by letters shall direct your course, When time is ripe, (which will be suddenly,) I'll steal to Glendower and lord Mortimer; Where you and Douglas, and our powers at once, (As I will fashion it,) shall happily meet, To bear our fortunes in our own strong arms, Which now we hold at much uncertainty. North. Farewell, good brother : we shall thrive,

I trust. Hot. Uncle, adieu:-0, let the hours be short, Till fields, and blows, and groans applaud our sport!

[Exeunt.

· ACT THE SECOND.

SCENE I.

Rochester. An Inn Yard.

Enter a Carrier, with a Lantern in his hand. 1 Car. Heigh ho! An't be not four by the day, I'll be hanged: Charles' wain is over the new chimney, and yet our horse not packed. What, ostler !

Ost. [Within.] Anon, anon.

1 Car. I pr’ythee, Tom, beat Cut's saddle, put a few flocks in the point; the poor jade is wrung in the withers out of all cess.

Enter another Carrier.

2 Car. Pease and beans are as dank here as a dog, and that is the next way to give poor jades the bots : this house is turned upside down, since Robin ostler died.

1 Car. Poor fellow! never joyed since the price of oats rose; it was the death of him.

2 Car, I think this be the most villainous house in all London road for fleas : I am stung like a tench.

1 Car. Like a tench? by the mass, there is ne'er a king in Christendom could be better bit than I have been since the first cock.

2 Car. What, ostler! come away and be hanged, come away. I have a gammon of bacon, and two razes of ginger, to be delivered as far as Charing

1 Car. The turkies in my pannier are quite starved. - What, ostler! - A plague on thee! hast thou never an eye in thy head? canst not hear ? An 'twere not as good a deed as drink, to break the pate of thee, I am a very villain.

Come, and be hanged:-Hast no faith in thee?

cross.

Enter GADSHILL.

Gads. Good morrow, carriers. What's o'clock? 1 Car. I think it be two o'clock.

Gads. I pr’ythee, lend me thy lantern, to see my gelding in the stable.

1 Car. Nay, soft, I pray ye; I know a trick worth two of that.

4 Name of his horse.

5 Measure.

• Spotted like a tench.

Gads. I pr'ythee lend me thine.

2 Car. Āy, when ? canst tell ? — Lend me thy lantern, quoth a ?- marry, I'll see thee hanged first.

Gads. Sirrah carrier, what time do you mean to come to London?

2 Car. Time enough to go to bed with a candle, I warrant thee. - Come, neighbour Mugs, we'll call up the gentlemen ; they will

along with company, for they have great charge. [Exeunt Carriers.

Gads. What, ho! chamberlain !
Cham. [Within.] At hand, quoth pick-purse.

Gads. That's even as fair as at hand, quoth the chamberlain: for thou variest no more from picking of purses, than giving direction doth from labouring; thou lay'st the plot how.

Enter Chamberlain.

Cham. Good morrow, master Gadshill. It holds current, that I told you yesternight: There's a franklin 8 in the wild of Kent, hath brought three hundred marks with him in gold: I heard him tell it to one of his company, last night at supper ; a kind of auditor; one that hath abundance of charge too, heaven knows what. They are up already, and call for eggs and butter: They will away presently.

Gads. Sirrah, if they meet not with saint Nicholas' clerks', I'll give thee this neck.

Cham. No, I'll none of it: I pr’ythee keep that for the hangman ; for, I know, thou worship’st saint Nicholas as truly as a man of falsehood may.

Gads. What talkest thou to me of the hangman? if I hang, I'll make a fat pair of gallows : for, if I hang, old sir John hangs with me; and, thou

7 A proverb, from the pick-purse being always ready. 8 Freeholder.

Cant term for highwaymen.

knowest, he's no starveling. Tut: there are other Trojans that thou dreamest not of, the which, for sport sake, are content to do the profession some grace; that would, if matters should be looked into, for their own credit sake, make all whole. I am joined with no foot land-rakers', no long-staff, sixpenny strikers ; none of these mad, mustachio, purple-hued malt-worms: but with nobility, and tranquillity ; burgo-masters, and great oneyers '; such as can hold in; such as will strike sooner than speak, and speak sooner than drink, and drink sooner than pray: And yet I lie ; for they pray continually to their saint, the common-wealth ; or, rather, not pray to her, but prey on her; for they ride up and down on her, and make her their boots.3

Cham. What, the commonwealth their boots ? will she hold out water in wet weather?

Gads. She will, she will ; justice hath liquored her. We steal as in a castle, cock-sure; we have the receipt of fernseed, we walk invisible.

Cham. Nay, by my faith! I think you are more beholden to the night than to fern-seed, for your walking invisible.

Gads. Give me thy hand : thou shalt have a share in our purchase, as I am a true man.

Cham. Nay, rather let me have it as you are a false thief. Gads. Go to; Homo is a common name to all

Bid the ostler bring my gelding out of the stable. Farewell, you muddy knave. [Exeunt.

men.

1 Footpads. 3 Booty.

2 Publick accountants.
4 Oiled, smoothed her over.

SCENE II.

The Road by Gadshill.

Enter Prince Henry and Poins; BARDOLPH and

Pero, at some distance. Poins. Come, shelter, shelter; I have removed Falstaff's horse, and he frets like a gummed velvet.

P. Hen. Stand close.

Enter FALSTAFF.
Fal. Poins ! Poins ! and be hanged ! Poins !

P. Hen. Peace, ye fat-kidney'd rascal ; what a brawling dost thou keep!

Fal. Where's Poins, Hal ?

P. Hen. He is walked up to the top of the hill ; I'll go seek him.

[Pretends to seek Poins. Fal. I am accursed to rob in that thief's company: the rascal hath removed my horse, and tied him I know not where. If I travel but four foot by the squires further afoot, I shall break

my

wind. Well, I doubt not but to die a fair death for all this, if I 'scape hanging for killing that rogue. I have forsworn his

company hourly any time these two-andtwenty years, and yet I am bewitched with the rogue's company. If the rascal have not given me medicines to make me love him, I'll be hanged ; it could not be else ; I have drunk medicines.

Poins ! - Hal!-a plague upon you both!- Bardolph!Peto !-- I'll starve ere I'll rob a foot further. An ?twere not as good a deed as drink, to turn true man, and leave these rogues, I am the veriest varlet

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