Oldalképek
PDF
ePub

JUPITER AND MERCURY.

A

F A B L E.

WRITTEN SOME TIME SINCE BY DAVID GARRICK,

ESQ

HERE, Hermes, says Jove, who with nectar was

mellow, Go fetch me fome clay-I will make an odd fel

low :

[ocr errors]

Right and wrong shall be jumbled, -much gold, and

some dross : Without cause be he pleas'd, without cause be he

'crofs ; Be sure as I work, to throw in contradi&tions, A great love of truth; yet a mind turn'd to fic.

tions Now mix these ingredients, which warm'd in ih,

baking, Turn to Learning, and Gaming, Religion, and

Raking,
With the love of a wench, let his writings be chaste;
Tip his tongue with strange matter, his pen with

fine taste;—
That the Rake and the Poet o'er all may prevail,
Set fire to the heaci. and set fire to the tail :
Vol. II.

H

For

For the joy of each sex on the world I'll bestow it : This Scholar, Rake, Christian, Dupe, Gamester,

and Poet, Thro' a mixture so odd, he shall merit great fame, And among brother mortalsbe GOLDSMITH his

name! When on earth this strange meteor no more shall

appear, You Hermes shall fetch him,- to make us sport here!

[blocks in formation]

Says epicure Quin ! should the D-1 in H-11,
In fishing for men take delight,
His hook bait with ven’son, I love it so well,
By G--d, I am sure I Mould bite !

[blocks in formation]

Rich wines and spices waste ! Like sturgeon, or like brawn, fhall I Bound in a precious pickle, lie,

Which I can never taste:

Let me embalm this flesh of mine
With turtle-fat, and Bourdeaux wine,

And spoil th' Egyptian trade!
Than Humphry's duke more happy I
Embalm'd alive, old Quin Mall die

A mummy ready made.

EPITAPHON MR. QUI N.

BY

THE

SAME.

THAT tongue, which set the table on a roar,
And charm'd the public ear, is heard no more!
Clos'd are those eyes, the harbingers of wit,
Which spoke, before the tongue, what Shakespe ire

writ. Cold are those hands, which, living, were ftre:ch'd

forth, At Friendship’s call, to fuccour modest worth. Here lies James Quin! deign, reader, to be taught, (Whate'er thy strength of body, force of thought, In Nature's happiest mould however caft) To this complexion thou must come at last.

[ocr errors][merged small]

EXTEMPORE, ON HEARING A CERTAIN IMPER

TINENT ADDRESS IN THE NEWS PAPERS.

[blocks in formation]

THOU essence of dock, of valerian and sage,
At once the disgrace and the pest of this age,
The worst that we wish thee for all thy damad

crimes, Is to take thy own phyfiç and read thy own rhimes,

ANSWER TO THE JUNTO.

THEIR with must be in form revers'd,

To suit the doctor's crimes ; For, if he takes his physic first,

He'll never read his shimes,

DR. HILL'S REPLY TO THE JUNTO'S EPIGRAM.

YE desperate junto, ye great, or ye small,
Who combat dukes, doctors, the devil and all !
Whether gentlemen, scribblers, or poets in jail,
Your impertinent curses shall never prevail :
I'll take neither sage, dock, nor balsam of honey :
Do you take the phyfic, and I'll take the money.

ANTI-JUNTO.

[blocks in formation]

TO DR. HILL, UPON HIS PETITION OF THE LIT

TER I TO MR, GARRICK,

[blocks in formation]

IF 'tis true, as you say, that I've injured a letter,
I'll change my note foon, and I hope for the better;
May the right use of letters, as well as of men,
Hereafter be fix'd by the tongue and the pen ;
Most devoutly I wish that they both have their due,
And that I may be never mistaken for U.

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors]
« ElőzőTovább »