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“ The soldier, tir'd of war's alarms,
Exults to feast on beauty's charms,

And drops the spear and shield:
But if the brazen trumpet sound,
He burns with conqueft to be crown'd,

And dares again the field.”

Oh ! be the example copied in each heart,
Let modern Britons act the ancient part,
And you, great Sir, these parting rites receive,
Which, bath'd in tears, your hardy veterans give;
Veterans approv d, who never knew to yield,
When Howe and Glory led them to the field.
To other scenes your country's sacred cause
Now calls you hence, the champion of her laws.
Your veterans, to your brave successor true,
By honouring him, will seek to honour you.
And ye, bright nymphs, who grace this hallow'd

ground,
In all the blooming pride of beauty crown'd,
Still strive to footh the hero's

generous toils With what he deems his best reward, your smiles.

E P IGRA M.
LORD Bute, his ambition and wisdom, to shew,
Resign'd the green ribbon, and put on the blue.
To two strings already, the Peer's been preferr'd,
Odd numbers are lucky-pray give him a third,

E P. I G R A M.

ON DOCTOR FRANKLIN's POINTED ELECTRICAL

CONDUCTORS BEING TAKEN, DOWN AT BUCK-
INGHAM HOUSE, AND MR. WILSON's BLUNT
CONDUCTORS ERECTED IN THEIR STEAD.

OUR public buildings to defend

From the keen lightning's brunt, Some pointed rods would recommend,

Others prefer the BLUNT.

Let me too, 'midst this learned throng,

Shew how to save our structures ; Alas! we've tried the blunt too long,

We now want sHARP CONDUCTORS,

F. R. S,

1

ODE,

D

E,

FOR

HIS MAJESTY'S BIRTH-DAY ;

WRITTEN BY WILLIAM WHITEHEAD, ESQ; POET

LAUREAT, AND PERFORMED AT ST. JAMES'S ON THE FOURTH OF JUNE, 1776, BY HIS MAjesty'S BAND OF MUSICIANS.

YE western gales, whose genial breath
Unbinds the glebe, 'till all beneath

One verdant livery wears :
You soothe the sultry heats of noon,
Add softness to the setting fun,

And dry the morning's tears.

This is your season, lovely gales,
Thro' Æther now your power prevails;
And our dilated breasts shall own
The joys which flow from you alone.

Why, therefore, in yon dubious sky,
With out-fpread wing, and eager eye

On distant scenes intent,
" Sits Expectation in the air."-
Why do alternate hope and fear

Suspend some great event?
Can Britain fail ? - the thought were vain ;
The powerful empress of the main

But strives to smooth th' unruly flood,
And dreads a conquest stain'd with blood.

While yet, ye winds, your breezy balm
Thro' nature spreads a general calm,
While yet a pause fell Discord knows ;
Catch the soft moment of repose,

Your genuine powers exert;
To pity melt th' obdurate mind,
Teach every bosom to be kind,

And humanize the heart!

Propitious gales, O wing your way!
And whilst we hail that rightful sway

Whence temper'd Freedom springs;
The bliss we feel to future times
Extend, and from your native climes

Bring peace upon your wings !

A BAL.

A B A L LAD

WRITTEN, OR RATHER SPOKEN, BY A GENTLEMAN, AT COMING INTO A COFFEE-HOUSE, FROM THE ABOVE MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT,

SAY

no more of the breezes-some wine and to.

bacco, A plague on his weft, 'tis an arrant † firocco ; As I live the damn'd poet has brought 'em together, To warble of winds, and to sing of the weather.

Then he talk'd, filly fellow, of tumult and war, And he fet Expectation aloft in the air, Like a witch on her broom looking out of the north, To see if the storm she had rais'd was gone forth.

Time was, that a laureat sweetly would fing Of the virtue, or valour, or wit of the king. That time is no more, and we now cannot hear, Any praise of our monarch once in a year.

A peftilential south-welt wind.
Is A south-west blow on ye
And bliser you all o'er.

Caliban. Tempest, Act. IV.

But

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