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Beysset (published in 1908). This family,

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apparently from a château built about 1100 at a village called Le Pin, about 7 miles from Lisieux (Calvados). From a rather wellknown English genealogist: Du Pin (French) and De Pute allude to the same family, settled at Upton Pine, near Exeter, from about 1135, and in other counties. From Calendar of Patent Rolls (1225-1232): Herbert de Pinu of Cornwall, Devon and Somerset; Hugh de Putte and Ric de Pitte, both of Somerset; Wm. de Putôt, Sheriff of Gloster. This surname was apparently also written Puys and Puz.

R. DUNN-GARDNER.

H. THOMSON, R.A. (cliv. 353).-Henry Thomson's picture, Love Sheltered,' was No. 5 in the Royal Academy Exhibition of 1806; its full title was:

LOVE SHELTERED.

It's a cold rainy night,
And I'm wet to the skin,

And I have lost my way, Ma'am,
So pray let me in.

An engraving of it in mezzotint was made by William Say.

An account of Thomson's life is given in theDictionary of National Biography,' also in The Gentleman's Magazine for July, 1843 (vol. xx. New Series, p. 100).

BENJAMIN WALKER.

The Library.

The Hippias Major attributed to Plato. With
Introductory Essay and Commentary by
Dorothy Tarrant. (Cambridge University
Press. 12s. 6d. net).

Miss Tarrant rejects

W the attribution of the Hippias Major, to

Plato. It is, indeed, an attribution which goes back virtually to the first appearance of a Platonic canon, and it seems to have remained uncentury, when German commentators began to questioned till the beginning of the nineteenth throw doubts upon it. It still boasts many a distinguished name in its support, though the array against it has grown more formidable with time. Of English scholars Adam accepted it, but Jowett took the other side, and gave it no place in his translation of the Dialogues. Miss Tarrant, in favour of rejection, points out that while stronger in literary quality than the other disputed dialogues, and in style resembling Plato, the Hippias Major shows affinity in this latter respect with later rather than with earlier dialogues, though from its earlier. Another important point in this conphysical interest, which also belongs to the nection is the presence of considerable metalater works. Such dramatic merits as the dialogue possesses are dealt with appreciatively, the characterization of Hippias being rated somewhat more highly than we should be inclined to rate it. If Thrasymachus was the model-and we can hardly doubt it-Hippias is just such an imitation of him as a bright youth might make; the Platonic style, not perfectly kept up, however, belongs to that kind of clever echo that has often diverted us in a University magazine. Plato's style not only lends itself to imitation; it is also, as those whose lot it is, or has been, to write Greek, are well aware, what one may call actively infectious, and its power over the young men of his own day must have been inescapably pervasive. But if Hippias may count as a success, though his stuthis dialogue, and with him the conduct of the pidity is heavily exaggerated, the Socrates of argument, is immature work. The invention of the unknown disputant, whose discussion with him Socrates lays before Hippias verbatim, seems specially a youthful invention, for the sake of avoiding the difficulties of neat reported speech, and getting in more abundant humorous touches.

general plan it would be placed with the

RAGNAR'S SAGA (cliv. 352).-There are some notes and a partial rendering, in the half-forgotten tragedy, Cottle's Alfred.' FRANCIS P. MARCHANT. A UTHOR WANTED (cliv. 246, 286).-2. Did the expression "masks and faces" originate in the title of the Reade-Taylor play? The moral of the piece, quoted at the second reference, has the sound of being elaborated from the title, rather than of the title being conMiss Tarrant's Introduction is an exceldensed from it. A book of verse, published in make a compact, but most interesting and uselent piece of work. She takes occasion to the 1880's, called 'Masks and Faces,' and a scientific work by Ellen ful, study of Plato's Theory of Ideas as develRussell Emerson, oped in the earlier dialogues, concluding with entitled Masks, Heads and Faces (Boston and the Phaedo.' We think to the scale set outLondon, 1892) would not, I should think, have this could hardly be better done, and many a ventured to plagiarize a title so well known student who has dismissed the Hippias' from unless it had been derived from a source con- attention will value this volume for its sake. sidered common property. The combination of For the immediate purpose of the book, howthe two words is obvious, of course, for suggest-ever, the sections on Metaphysic in the Hiping the universal platitude that things are not what they appear to be. PAUL MCPHARLIN.

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pias Major' on its Theory of Pleasure as compared with that of Plato's Dialogues, and on its Style and Vocabulary are no less deserving of

praise. Though the reader may be struck by its workmanlike simplicity as the first merit in the handling of this book, he will certainly before long feel in it the particular attractiveness which arises from sound and ready scholarship combined with lively personal interest in the topics discussed.

The Taming of the Shrew. Edited in the CamArthur bridge New Shakespeare by Sir Quiller-Couch and John Dover Wilson. (Cambridge University Press. 6s. net).

NOT one of the great plays, The Taming of

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the Shrew is one of the most enthralling to an editor. Sir Arthur-Quiller Couch takes occasion by the difficulties to which he has here to address himself to make a statement, brief but bold," of the critical principles which the new editors have applied hitherto, and propose further to apply to the questions of date, authenticity and so on connected with each play. We think he justifies these principles satisfactorily against opposers, and chiefly because, on the one hand, they are based on considerations derived from the conditions of playwright and playhouse at the time of the production of the play, and on the other hand, tend to discredit that old mode of criticism which purported to assign lines, supposed non-Shakespearian, to this or that other poet. Moreover, there is frank recognition that Shakespeare could write bad verse and nonsense. (At the close of this section occurs an amusing misprint: "moth and dust corrupting.")

Among the many questions which surround this play, the most interesting is that concerning its true relation to the play called The Taming of a Shrew which Peter Short entered at Stationers' Hall in May, 1594. Mr. Dover Wilson, whose Note on the Copy for this play is perhaps the most brilliant of this series of Notes, after exhaustive consideration of every fact known or surmised about it, brings us out, by way of the plague of 1592-4, and the necessities of the dispersed players, to the conclusion that Short's Shrew' may have been a version of Shakespeare's play, put together as best they might by a troupe of actors from different companies, touring together for the nonce while the bad days lasted, who had parted for money with their books. If this be so-and Mr. Dover Wilson makes out a strong case for it, considering the paucity of data to work with Shakespeare's The Shrew must be dated before May, 1594, with some likelihood of a year or two before. We entirely agree that it should not be impossible to believe Shakespeare at that date capable of the beautiful verse to which several passages rise. It is indeed consonant with the strong tradition of his uncommon spontaneity that jets flashes of the genius within him and in its true quality should have burst forth in the midst of early rough or careless work, on his imagination being touched and warmed by some happy chance. Probably he worked by the rule which we recently saw propounded by a modern well-known dramatist to young would

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be successors to make sure of plot and action and let the dialogue take care of itself. At any rate, The Taming of the Shrew,' with all its confusions and shortcomings, proves itself always a remarkably good acting play. This means, among other things, as Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch points out, that there is in it— that is in both Petruchio and Katharina on inward whom the play depends a certain reality which the actor has to bring out and which makes unfailing appeal. It is a particularly happy remark that the underlying delicacy of the conception of Petruchio is shown by his never, in all the trials he imposes upon the shrew, saying "the sort of misprising word that hurts a high-mettled woman more than any rough deed.

The Reule of Crysten Religioun. By Reginald Pecock. Edited by William Cabell_Greet. (Humphrey Milford for the Early English Text Society. £1 15s. net.)

THE single manuscript of this work is now at New York in the Pierpont-Morgan Library having been bought to figure among the collector's authors' manuscripts, though it is in fact, as Mr. Greet's description shows, the work of an ordinary scribe. It is incomplete, ending at chapter vi of the fifth treatise. Mr. Greet, with a few exceptions dictated by common sense, reproduces the spelling of the manuscript, and such of its eccentricities as are not confusing. He furnishes a short introduction and also a glossary. This work of Pecock's has not hitherto been accessible to students, who within_the lish Text Society his Donet last seven or eight years owe to the Early Eng· and Folewer,' while The Repressor (1860) and the Book of Editors of Pecock are constrained to dwell on Faith (1909) have been longer in their hands. would have found it more natural, on such his dulness: he writes rather like one who topics as he deals with, to write in Latin, and with prolixity, too, as of a busy person who has no time to be brief. But what he tried to accomplish the drawing out of a statement of Christian doctrine, to serve as constructive defence of the Church against heresy, somewhat after the plan of the Summa of St. Thomas Aquinas, claims some respect. The master idea about which his thought revolved was that of the true function in religious life of the native powers of man, pre-eminently of reason, contrasting, thus, with the earlier Christian thought of the Middle Ages which emphasized chiefly God's grace. The Reule' represents the beginning of his exposition. Those who come to make use of this volume will not fail to realise how much labour on the part of editor, transcriber and printer it has demanded.

NOTIONS TO CORRESPONDENTS.

APPROVED Queries are inserted free of charge. Contributors are requested always to give their names and addresses, for the information of the Editor, and not necessarily for publication.

Printed and Published by The Bucks Free Press, Ltd., at their Offices, 20, High Street, High Wycombe, in the County of Bucks.

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NOTES:-Unpublished Letters of Warren Hastings, 399-The Story of the Calliope, 400-The King's Ships, 402-Changing London, 405. QUERIES:

"

The Early British Church, 405 'Right-hand Man "-Van Dyck's portrait of Scaglia-A three-noted Cuckoo-Picture Wanted -"As plain as a pikestaff," 406--Puzzle Inscriptions-" Grimalkin in a letter of Mme de Sevigne "In the same boat "-Russian Alphabet Lt. Gen. Henry Hawley Marionettes in Saville Row-Drunkenness as a penance-" Passing the Wood," 407 REPLIES:-Lancaster Unitarian Ministers-Mer. curius Domesticus,' 408 Owen's Weeklu Chronicle-The Critics, 409 The RegicidesArius: Pronounciation, 410-Place-name, Perrow -Jack Ketch, the Executioner-Lewin FamilySir Walter Raleigh and Brixton, 411-Sir Hay Macdowall-Poems in praise of books and reading-Nazareth as a Christian name-English Officers in Austrian service-Agricultural and building customs: Temoins Source wanted, 412.

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NOTES & QUERIES.

WANTED.

THIRD SERIES.-General Index
FIFTH SERIES.-General Index.

SIXTH SERIES.-Vol. vii (Jan.-June, 1883).
Vol. xi (Jan.-June, 1885).
Vol. xii (Jul.-Dec., 1885).

SEVENTH SERIES.-Vol. v (Jan.-June, 1888). Vol. vi (July-Dec., 1888.

EIGHTH SERIES.-Vol. i (Jan.-June, 1892). TWELFTH SERIES.-Vol. viii (Jan.-June, 1921). VOL. CL.-No. 19 (May 8, 1926).

VOL. CXLVIII.-No. 6 (Feb. 7. 1925).

No. 7 (Feb. 14, 1925).
No. 8 (Feb. 21, 1925).

No. 9 (Feb. 28, 1925).

THE following numbers and Volume Indices of the TWELFTH SERIES or the complete volumes in which they are included:

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No. 2-Jan. 8, 1916 (Vol. i).
No. 53-Dec. 30, 1916 (Vol. ii).
No. 67-Apr. 14, 1917 (Vol. iii).
No. 86-November, 1917 (Vol. iv).
No. 128-Sept. 25, 1920 (Vol. vii).
No. 148-Feb. 12, 1921 (Vol. viii).
No. 168 July 2, 1921 (Vol. ix).
No. 185-Oct. 29, 1921 (Vol. ix).
No. 194-Dec. 31, 1921 (Vol. ix).
No. 228-Aug. 26, 1922 (Vol. xi).

Indices to Vol._vi (Jan.-June, 1920) and
Vol ix (July-Dec., 1921).

Please send offers to-" NOTES & QUERIES," 20, High Street, High Wycombe, Bucks.

SETS FOR SALE.

FIRST SERIES (1849-1855), 12 Volumes and General Index, bound cloth, (2 volumes and General Index in Publisher's cloth), second hand, clean and sound, £3 38.

SECOND SERIES (1856-1861), 12 volumes, uniformly bound in cloth, second hand, clean and sound, £2 2s. THIRD SERIES (1862-1867), 12 volumes, uniformly bound in cloth, second hand, clean and sound, £2 2s.

The three above series are all uniformly bound except for the two volumes and General Index of the First Series.

THIRD SERIES (1862-1867), bound half leather, marbled boards, in new condition. £10 108. FOURTH

SERIES (1868-1883), bound half leather, marbled boards, second hand, in good condition, £7 78.

FIFTH SERIES (1874-1879) bound half leather, marbled boards, second-hand, in good condition, £7 78.

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NOTES AND QUERIES is Puglis Wycomby Friday, at 20, High Street, High Wycombe, Bucks (Telephone: Wycombe 306). Subscriptions (£2 28. a year, U.S.A. $10.50, including postage, two half-yearly indexes and two cloth binding cases, or £1 15s. 4d a year, U.S.A. $9, without binding cases) should be sent to the Manager. The London Office is at 14, Burleigh Street, W.C.2 (Telephone: Chancery 8766), where the current issue is on sale. Orders for back numbers, indexes and bound volumes should be sent either to London or to Wycombe; letters for the Editor to the London Office.

Memorabilia.

OUR publication of a series of letters writil. ten by Warren Hastings in his old age, which is concluded to-day with the 62nd 1 letter, written a few weeks before his death in 1818, has done something to stimulate the perennial interest in that great man; and, we are glad to record, it has brought a number of new readers to N. & Q.' From the same source we have obtained a few Tunpublished poems by Hastings, which we hope to print shortly. He was not a great poet, but his verse has a directness and vivacity characteristic of his mind. THIS month the world of science has been celebrating with due solemnity the third centenary of the publication of William Harvey's De Motu Sanguinis; and the Nonesuch Press, which is responsible for some of the most beautiful books published in recent years, has seized the opportunity to give us a reproduction, finely printed on fine paper and finely bound, of the original work, together with the later and more detailed De Circulatione Sanguinis, edited with notes by Mr. Geoffrey Keynes. The book is in every way worthy of the occasion, and of the publishers.

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SIR

IR Alfred Robbins has contributed a substantial pamphlet entitled 'The Press' to Benn's Sixpenny Library. Though it is mainly historical-the chapter on the liberty of the Press is particularly good-there is much shrewd observation on present-day tendencies, on which few speak with more authority than the author. The first halfpenny morning daily was not The Morning of 1892, as stated on p. 64, but The Summary, issued by The Times in 1883.

THE Sussex County Magazine, which often

contains articles of interest to our readers, publishes in its June number an account of the sale of what is believed to be the last team of six red oxen used for ploughing in this country. After a brief period of fattening on Pevensey marshes, they sent to the butcher, to put an end to a long To the same chapter in English history. magazine Mr. S. E. Winbolt is contributing a valuable series of articles on Roman Sussex.

were

HONOURS announced on the King's Birthday are, as usual, mainly political and official; but we notice with pleasure Knighthoods for Professor Craigie, of the Oxford English Dictionary, for General Edmonds, the military historian, for Dr. J. H. Jeans, Secretary of the Royal Society, and for Mr. Nigel Playfair, whose conduct of the Lyric Theatre, Hammersmith, has lent distinction to the London stage. Sir George Grierson's Order of Merit will also be generally welcomed.

MR. R. J. A. Lovat-Fraser, in writing to The Times, points out that the statement ascribed to George III that Shakespeare was does not square with what is

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known of the King. He goes on to say: "One of his most precious possessions was a copy of Shakespeare which had belonged to Charles I., who had inscribed in it his favourite adage, Dum spiro, spero.' This book was one of the 30 books reserved by George IV. when the Royal Library handed over to the British Museum. There is an infinitely pathetic incident recorded of the King which I take from William Toynbee's Vignettes of the Regency.' During one of the old blind King's infrequent intervals of lucidity in his last days, the Princess Elizabeth, at his special request, read him his favourite play, 'King Lear.' When she finished he murmured, Ah, I have become like poor Lear, old and blind and feeble, but,' he added, tremulously raising his voice, thank God, I have no Goneril nor Regan. No, no,' turning his sightless eyes lovingly towards his daughters, all Cordelias, all Cordelias.'" THE June number of The Connoisseur con

tains an article on the Queen's collection of lace, which consists largely of pieces of historical interest produced in the British Isles. Perhaps the most important piece is the Court train of Irish needle point lace presented by the ladies of Belfast on the occasion of the Coronation and worn by her Majesty at the Delhi Durbar. It was made at the Presentation Convent of Youghal, by sixty skilled

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