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29. 'Side View of the Pink Terrace, Rotomahana, showing 39. The Rolleston Range, with Glacier, Arthur's Pass, Can the Great Stalactite Terraces.

terbury. 30. The Te Tarata Terrace, Rotomahana, looking down on 40. Summit of Arthur's Pass, Westland, looking west. the Lake from the Crater.

41. Summit of Arthur's Pass, Westland, looking east. 31. The Crystal Slope of the Te Kiwi Geyser, Rotomahana. 42. Looking through the Forest on the Teremakan River.

32. Captain Cook's Bay, where he took the transit of 43. On the Teremakau River Bed, Westland. Mercury, November 9th, 1769.

44. In the Kahikatea, or White Pine Forest, Westland. 33. Cabbage Tree Palms, Governor's Bay, Canterbury.

45. An Hotel on the Gold Fields near Fox's Diggings, 34. Dyer's Pass Road, Head of Lyttleton Harbour.

Westland. 35. Government Buildings, Christchurch, Canterbury.

46. White Pine Forest, West Coast Road, Canterbury. 36. Craigieburn Cutting, West Coast Road, Canterbury.

47. Thames Gold Field, from top of Moanataiari Tramvas, 37. Study on the Otira River, Southern Alps, Canterbury. 1,200 ft. above the sea. 38. The Bealey River Bed, Canterbury.

48. Akaroa Bay, Banks' Peninsula, Canterbury. Cl. 300.

MAPS AND PLANS. Collection made by Dr. Hector for the Commissioners :

3. Geological Map. Small scale. Published by E. Ravenstes. 1. Official Maps of the Colony of New Zealand. Pub- 4. Model of New Zealand in Relief. lished by E. Ravenstein.

5. Plans and Diagrams of Gold Fields, &c. 2. Geological Map of New Zealand, by Dr. Hector, MSS. 6. Physical Map of New Zealand, by Dr. Hector. Cl. 600, 601.

TIMBER. Taranaki Committee :

31. Elæocarpus dentatus, Hinau. 1. Dodonæa viscosa, Native name, Akeake, 2 specimens. 32. Knightia excelsa, Rewarewa. 2. Atherosperma nova zealandiæ, Pukatea.

33. Dammara australis var., Mottled Kauri. 3. Eugenia maire, Maire tauhake.

Westland Committee :4. Podocarpus ferruginea, Totara.

34. Metrosideros robusta, Rata, iron wood. 5. dacrydioides, Kahikatea.

35. Podocarpus totara, Totara. 6. Dysoxylum spectabile, Kohekohe. 7. Podocarpus spicata, Matai.

36. Podocarpus spicata, Matai, Black Pine.

37. 8. Weinmannia racemosa, Towhai.

ferruginea, Miro.

38. 9. Knightia excelsa, Rewarewa.

dacrydioides, Kahikatea, White Pine. 39.

ditto var. Yellow Pine. 10. Elæocarpus dentatus, Hindu.

40.

colensoi Silver Pine. 11. Alectryon excelsum, Titoki.

41. Libocedrus doniana, Kawaka. 12. Sophora tetraptera, Kowhai. 13. Nesodaphne tawa, Tawa.

42. Dacrydium cupressinum, Kimu, Red Pine.

43. Phyllocladus trichomanoides, Toatoa, Celery-leaved 14. Metrosideros robusta, Rata.

Pine. 15. Dacrydium cupressinum, Rimu. 16. Vitex littoralis, Puriri.

44. Leptospermum scoparium, Manuka. 17. Hedycarya dentata, Kaiuhiria.

45. Fagus fusca, Tawai, Black Birch. W. B. Black, American Coach Factory, Wellington :

46. Fagus menziesii, Red Birch.)

47. 18. Alectryon excelsum, Titoki, 2 specimens.

cliffortioides, Dwarf Birch. 19. Eugenia maire, Black Maire.

48. Elæocarpus dentatus, Hinau. 20. White Maire.

49.

hookerianus, Pokaka. 21. Leptospermum sp., Manuka.

50. Weinmannia racemosa, Towhai, Red Wood. 22.

51. sap wood.

sylvicola, Tauhero, White Wood. 23. Vitex littoralis, Puriri, 2 specimens.

52. Griselinia lucida, Pukatea, Broad leaf. 24. Sophora tetraptera, Kowhai.

53. Fuchsia excorticata, Kotukutuku Fuchsia. 25. Dodonæa viscosa, Akeake.

54. Hoheria augustifolia, Houhere, Ribbonwood. 26. Podocarpus ferruginea, Miro.

55. Aristotelia racemosa, Makomako, Currant Tree. 27. Metrosideros robusta, Rata.

56. Melicytus ramiflorus, Mahoe or Hinehine.

57. Sambucus novæ zealandiæ, Hauhau. 28. Podocarpus totara, Totara, knot. J. D. Cruickshank, Upper Hutt Saw Mills, Wellington :

58. Panax crassifolium, Horoeka, Lance Wood. 29. Plank of Rimu (Dacrydium cupressinum), Red Pine of

59. Coriaria ruscifolia, Tutu. Settlers.

60. Drimys colorata, Horopita, Peper Tree. W. James, Wellington :

61. Olearia avicenniæ folia, Mikemike Yellow Wool. 30. Podocarpus totara, Totara, 2 specimens of knots.

62, Caprosma, Karamu, White Wood.

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Cl. 312.
GARMENTS, ORNAMENTS, WEAPONS, &C., OF THE MAORIS.

Tuwhare in 1830, on the Whanganui river when the Ngapuhi COLLECTION MADE FOR THE COMMISSIONERS BY R. W.

invaded that part of the island. WOON, R.M.

29. Te Mawae.- Tewatewa, a wooden battle-axe. 1. Haimona Te Ao o te Rangi, chief of Ngatipanioaua tribe.- 30. Hoani Maramara.-Korowai, flax (Phormium) mat A patuparaoa, whalebone weapon, called “ Pai a te Rangi,” 31. Hoani Maramara.-Flax Mourning Cap and Shark's handed down from ancestor named Kahunui, four generations Tooth Ear Ornament. back. Has been used in many battles, in which several chiefs 32. Uranga Kanihare.--- Motumotu, ornamented flax mut. and heroes “ were made to lick the dust."

Much prized by Maoris. 2. Horima Katene. A whalebone weapon called “ Nga Kanae 33. Rini Remoata, chief and assessor.-Kakahu Kura, flax a Titokowaru," lately the property of the celebrated chief mat ornamented with the red feathers of the Kaka or mountain Titokowaru, who devastated the West Coast Settlements in the parrot. Much prized. war of 1868. Is an heirloom of ancient date.

34. Menehira.- Parawai, flax mat with rich border. 3. Thakara Tukumaru.-A Tewatewa-wooden weapon.

35. Reneti Tapa.-Flax Mat, interwoven with Feathers of 4. Uranga Kaiwhare.-A Kakati-carved whalebone weapon the native wood pigeon, called Waitahuparai; intended as a called " Kaikanohi” (face eater) handed down for 12 genera- gift to the President of the United States. tions,

36. Hori Te Roka.-Ugare, flax mat. 5. Takarangi Mete. – A patuparaoa-whalebone weapon 37. Major Keepa.-Dyed flax Cap. called « Tohiora." This is much prized, having been used 38. Captain Wirihana Puna.- Kakahu Kura, ornamented by Te Maro, a member of the native Contingent in “knocking flax and feather mat ; intended as a gift to the President of the on the head, and despatching" the great prophet and leader of United States. the Hauhan forces at the battle of Moutoa, in May 1864.

39. Captain Mei Hunia.-Parawai, ornamented mat. 6. Hohaia.-A patuparaoa-whalbone weapon.

40. Pehira Turei, Queen's pensioner.—Toi Mat made from 7. Te Reimana.-A patuparaoa-whalebone weapon.

Toi plant found at foot of Tongariro, or the burning moun8. Te Reimana.—A patu-stone weapon called “Kororariki." tain. 9. Te Koroneho.-A patuparaoa-whalebone weapon.

41. Pehira Turei.—Dyed flax Mourning Cap. 10. Reihana.--A patu Kobatu, a stone weapon.

42. Maori Adze, called an Aronui. Two ancient Fish-books, 11. Aperaniko Tamaite.--A patu kohatu, a stone weapon. tipped with human bone. Wooden Flute, called a Koauan, used

12. Captain Wirihana.-A patuparaoa, whalebone weapon, for warbling love ditties. small size.

43. Aperahama Tahunuiarangi.-Carved Image from front 13. Keepa Rangitauira.-A tewatewa, wooden battle-axe. of ancient Maori house, called “Tamahaki,” descended from 14. Keepa Rangitauira.- Taiaha Kwra, ornamented spear. ancestors 10 generations back. 15. Epiha Aokokiri.—Taiaha, plain wooden spear.

44. Carved Pipe, made of reta, called “ Takirau," and speci16. Mete Kingi. — Taiaha, wooden spear ornamented with men of Dyed Flax. feathers.

45. Hakaria.--Hei Tiki, ancient greenstone neck ornament. 17. Mete Kingi. Tewatewa, wooden battle-axe with 46. Pehuinana.-Carved calabash Top, called “ Toka Taha." feathers.

47. Hami.—Two carved Wooden Implements, used in 18. Poutini.- Tewatewa, wooden battle-axe.

planting Kumaras (sweet potato), called “Ko Kumara." 19. Rewi Raupo.—Taiaha, wooden spear.

48. Te Hira.--Specimens of Flax, plain and dyed black. 20. Te Reniana.—Taiaha, wooden spear.

49. Karaitiana.-Hatchet, witd carved handle. Patiti. 21. Paora Kahuatua of Ranana.—Taiaha kura, ornamented 50. Poari Wharehuia.Hei Tiki, greenstone neck ornament.

51. Hiri Te Roha.-Ancient Paddle for steering a canoe. 22. Kiritakama.—Taiaha, plain wooden spear.

52. Shark's Tooth Ear Orament and a Fish-hook (made of 23. Taianhus.—Taiaha, plain wooden spear.

Pawa shell) used as a bait to catch the fish called Kahawi. 24. Tamihana te Aewa.—Taiaha, wooden spear.

53. Te Hira.–Skin of the Huia (Heteralocha gouldi). A 25. Peina.-Tewatewa, battle-axe.

chief's head ornament, 26. Paora Patapu.—Taiaha, spear.

Te Hira.-A Pounamu (greenstone) Ear Pendant of great 27. Paora Patapu.--A long Spear, taken as spoils of war at lustre. a battle in the Taupo country in 1869, lately the property of 54. Pikikotuku.- Pounamu Ear Ornament. Te Heuheu,

55. Hine Maaka.-Native Comb, called a karau. 28. Major Keepa.-A Pouwhenua ancient Spear, much 56. Hine Maaka,-Greenstone Ear Pendant. prized, called “ Aketaurangai.” This was used by the Wan- 57. John Mark.-Two Whale's Teeth Garment Fasteners ganui chief Amaráma in killing the great Ngapuhi chief and a Greenstone Ear Ornament.

wooden spear

58. Major Keepa.-Greenstone Adze, called an aronui, very ancient.

59. Major Keepa.--Skin of the Huia (Heteralocha gouldi). Head ornament of a chief.

60. Rev. B. K. Taylor, Wanganui.--Hat made of Kiekie (Frycenitcia bauksii). Manufactured by Hori Mutumutu. Flax for the Waist.

61. R. W. Woon, R.M., Wanganui.--Ancient Stone Axe of 10 generations back.

62. Hori Kingi Mawae.--Paddle with carved top.
63. Te Mawae.-Stone Hatchet of 10 generations back.

64. Reupea Tauria.-Paddle.

65. Maori Image with head dress and ear ornament of Toroa feathers called “ Rakeikuroa."

66. Hereatara.—Whakakai Greenstone Ear Ornament.

67. Turahui.---Pigeon Feather Mat, Eheruheru, with Greenstone Ear Pendant attached.

68. Taranaki Committee.-Hei Tiki, greenstone image, Forn round the neck; 2. Ancient Axe Heads of stone.

69. Taranaki Committee, Taiaka oramented with Kaka (parrot) feathers.

QUEENSLAND. Queensland, the north-east section of Australia, is a colony of vast size, and indeed, if we bear in mind that the most of it is available land either for pasture, agriculture, or mining, it may be called the largest in the Australian group. In area it is nearly three times that of the vast territory of Texas, in North America

, and its seaboard equals in length, and greaty resembles in shape, that of the United States, from Maine to Louisiana, the Florida peninsula corresponding to that of Cape York, and the Gulf of Mexico to that of Carpentaria. To give a sketch of the features of so grand an area, one must be content with a mere outline, in a work like the present. The most southerly point in Queensland consists of the highlands of Stanthorpe, the seat of the rich tin mines ; a granite table-land, with an average elevation of some 2,800 feet, and a climate resembling that of the south of England. The splendid black and amber crystals of tin oxyd are lavishly scattered in this district. Immediately adjoining, and on the north, lie the far-famed Darling Downs, at a general altitude of 1,600 feet above sea level, with the climate of Southern France, and one of the finest pastoral districts in the world. Open lagoons (so to speak) of rich, treeless herbage are bounded, as it were by shores of sheltering, open-timbered land, with jutting capes of forest here and there running out and dividing the grassy spaces into imaginary bays and lakes of verdure ; and the natural herbage, being grown on decomposed volcanic soil, is so rich that, in nutritive power, it equals the best corn and hay combined. These Darling Downs lie on the western escarpment of the great Australian Cordillera, which runs parallel to its east coast for 1,800 miles, and at about 70 miles back from the sea, and which separate the Darling Downs from the Moreton and Logan districts, a country rich in the finest cannel coal, and with good soil, well watered. The Wide Bay and Burnett district follow next, as we go northward, and in addition to their rich pastoral and agricultual capabilities, here lie the lucrative gold and copper fields of Gympie, Kilkiran, and Mount Perry, of which more hereafter. Gympie is famous for its rare mineral developments, such as walls of glittering calcspar, with rich imbedded gold all through them, and this gold and copper in any other part of the world, nearer to civilisation and capital, would be centres of attraction and busy population to one hundred times the extent of their present census. The rivers of Queensland, in the part we have at present described

, consist chiefly of the Brisbane and the Mary, both as wide as the Thames, and fairly navigable for sea-going vessels for miles up from the mouth. Immediately to the north of the district last described, comes that of which Rockhampton is the shipping port. Here we cross the tropic, and nature begins to show on a raster scale—larger rivers, larger plains, and larger animals are found. The two rivers, Fitzroy and Burdekin, drain a country larger than the ancient kingdom of France, and the great Australian alligator, 25 feet long, is found in them. Here, again, we have the gold and copper in abundance ; gold, silver, lead, and copper all being visible at once in one piece of quartz in many of the lodes hereabout. The zamais and other tropical palms begin to appear, as well as those gorgeous “scrubs” which obtain throughout the whole colony, and in whose

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Malachite Peak Downs
Copper

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Table
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Philadelphia Exhibition. How far the lan after inspection of its representative exhibit

The general arrangement of the Queen showing at a glance the physical character shown by a series of photographs illustratin photographs the natural products of such for

One side of the Queensland Court is devot of view; the other is illustrative of its mining will be observed is a tablet of information.*

I

From the illustrative tablet in this division

Soil.-Rich vegetable mould on scrub ] forming it. Generally adapted to agricultura

Products.-Cotton, sugar-cane, maize, &c. auriferous districts.

These facts, as given in the descriptive ti products can be freely grown, and that gold e

Photograph No. 1 is a view near Brisbane, Creek. Every kind of garden produce can river.

No. 2.-A view of a portion of the Mary ri left bank shows the thickness of the allui inexhaustible.

No. 3.-Also a view of a Queensland river, country on the other.

No. 4.-A view of Maryvale Creek, lat. 19 country are rather extensively developed, ani enormous kangaroos, the extinct dyprotodon, &

No. 5.--This is a characteristic view of mini working in the alluvium the depth of which va at the latter depth. Such deep sinking, howev is found in shallow drifts, rarely exceeding 20 1

No. 6.—This may be taken as a fairly repres deposits are generally very extensive, and the inland range.

No. 7.—Another view of Maryvale Creek, pr bones of some of the extinct animals are shown i

No. 8.-Here is depicted a rough method of sl mountainous parts of the colony.

* Most of these photographs were taken by Mr. R. D. the gum resin of one of the Australian Eucalypti was use autotype process, and coloured in oil,

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