William Shakespeare not an imposter, by an English critic [G.H. Townsend].

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107. oldal - I loved the man, and do honour his memory on this side idolatry as much as any. He was, indeed, honest, and of an open and free nature ; had an excellent phantasy, brave notions, and gentle expressions, wherein he flowed with that facility that sometimes it was necessary he should be stopped.
1. oldal - Truth may perhaps come to the price of a pearl, that showeth best by day ; but it will not rise to the price of a diamond or carbuncle, that showeth best in varied lights.
79. oldal - As Plautus and Seneca are accounted the best for comedy and tragedy among the Latines, so Shakespeare among the English is the most excellent in both kinds for the stage...
96. oldal - ... ordain'd otherwise, and he by death departed from that right, we pray you do not envie his friends the office of their care and paine...
106. oldal - I remember, the players have often mentioned it as an honour to Shakespeare, that in his writing (whatsoever he penned) he never blotted out a line. My answer hath been, Would he had blotted a thousand.
56. oldal - Have gloz^d, but superficially ; not much Unlike young men, whom Aristotle thought Unfit to hear moral philosophy. The reasons you allege do more conduce To the hot passion of...
100. oldal - Sweet Swan of Avon! what a sight it were To see thee in our waters yet appeare, And make those flights upon the bankes of Thames, That so did take Eliza, and our James\ But stay, I see thee in the Hemisphere Advanc'd, and made a Constellation there! Shine forth, thou Starre of Poets, and with rage, Or influence, chide, or cheere the drooping Stage; Which, since thy flight from hence, hath mourn'd like night, And despaires day, but for thy Volumes light.
70. oldal - The warrant I have of your honourable disposition, not the worth of my untutored lines, makes it assured of acceptance. What I have done is yours, what I have to do is yours ; being part in all I have, devoted yours. Were my worth greater my duty would show greater : meantime, as it is, it is bound to your Lordship, to whom I wish long life, still lengthened with all happiness. Your Lordship's in all duty, WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE.
99. oldal - Yet must I not give nature all ; thy art, My gentle SHAKESPEARE, must enjoy a part. For though the poet's matter nature be, His art doth give the fashion : and, that he 278 Who casts to write a living line, must sweat, (Such as thine are) and strike the second heat Upon the Muses...
99. oldal - Accius, him of Cordova dead, To life again, to hear thy buskin tread, And shake a stage; or, when thy socks were on, Leave thee alone for the comparison Of all that insolent Greece or haughty Rome Sent forth, or since did from their ashes come.

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