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look upon the sun, not as a short-lived hero, but as young, unchanging, and always the same, while generations after generations of mortal men were passing away. And hence, by the mere force of contrast, the first intimation of beings which do not wither and decay - of immortals, of immortality! Then the poet would implore the immortal sun to come again, to vouchsafe to the sleeper a new morning. The god of day would become the god of time, of life and death. Again the evening twilight, the sister of the dawn, repeating, though with a more sombre light, the wonders of the morning, how many feelings must it have roused in the musing poet how many poems must it have elicited in the living language of ancient times! Was it the dawn that came again to give a last embrace to him who had parted from her in the morning? Was she the immortal, the always returning goddess, and he the mortal, the daily dying sun? Or was she the mortal, bidding a last farewell to her immortal lover, burnt, as it were, on the same pile which would consume her, while he would rise to the seat of the gods?

Let us express these simple scenes in ancient language, and we shall find ourselves surrounded on every side by mythology full of contradictions and incongruities, the same being represented as mortal or immortal, as man or woman, as the poetical eye of man shifts its point of view, and gives its own color to the mysterious play of nature.- Chips from a German Workshop, Vol. II.

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ÜLLER, NIKOLAUS, German-American

poet; born at Langenau, in 1809; died at

New York, August 14, 1875. At the age of fourteen he entered a printing office; and having thoroughly learned the trade he settled at Stuttgart. But becoming involved in the insurrectionary movements of 1848, he was forced to flee. He went to Switzerland, and thence, in 1853, to the United States, where he settled in New York as proprietor of a printing establishment. He retired from business a year before his death. His earlier poems were published at Stuttgart between 1834 and 1837, under the general title Lieder eines Autodidakten; and were issued in collective form in the latter year. During the Civil War he issued at New York a volume entitled Zehn Gepanzerte Sonette; and in 1867 he published his Neueste Gedichte. During the war between France and Germany he issued his patriotic poem Friesche Blätter auf die Wunden Deutscher Krieger; and he was preparing a complete edition of his poems at the time of his death.

THE PARADISE OF TEARS.

Beside the River of Tears, with branches low,
And bitter leaves, the weeping willows grow;
The branches stream like the dishevelled hair
Of women in the sadness of despair.

On rolls the stream with a perpetual sigh;
The rocks moan wildly as it passes by;
Hyssop and wormwood border all the strand,
And not a flower adorns the dreary land.

Then comes a child, whose face is like the sun,
And dips the gloomy waters as they run,
And waters all the region, and behold
The ground is bright with blossoms manifold.

Where falls the tears of love the rose appears,
And where the ground is bright with friendship's tears,
Forget-me-not, and violets, heavenly blue,
Spring glittering with the cheerful drops like dew.

The souls of mourners, all whose tears are dried,
Like swans, come gently Aoating down the tide,

Walk up the golden sands by which it flows,
And in that Paradise of Tears repose.

There every heart rejoins its kindred heart;
There, in a long embrace that none may part,
Fulfilment meets desire, and that fair shore
Beholds its dwellers happy evermore.

Translation of William Cullen BRYANT.

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ÜLLER, Wilhelm, a German poet; born at

Dessau, October 7, 1794; died there, Sep

tember 30, 1827. He entered the University of Berlin in 1813, but left it the following year to serve in the War of Liberation. The war over, he returned to complete his studies, giving much attention to philology and history. In 1817 he began a two years' tour on the Continent, and on his return to Dessau became a teacher in the Normal School. He translated into German Marlowe's Faustus, and Fauriel's Modern Greek Popular Songs, published a collection in ten volumes of poems of the seventeenth century, and wrote many original poems, the first volume of which, entitled Blumenlese aus den Minnesängen, appeared in 1816. He published Lyrische Spaziergänge in 1827. After his death a new volume, Vermischte Schriften, was published, and in 1837 a collection of his poems was edited by Schwab. Another volume, Ausgewählte Gedichte, appeared in 1864

An appreciative and impartial essay on his work is to be found in the first series of Chips from a German I'orkshop, by his son, F. Max Müller.

SONG BEFORE BATTLE.

Whoe'er for freedom fights and falls, his fame no blight

shall know, As long as through heaven's free expanse the breezes

freely blow, As long as in the forest wild the green leaves flutter

free, As long as rivers, mountain-born, roll freely to the sea, As long as free the eagle's wing exulting cleaves the

skies, As long as from a freeman's heart a freeman's breath

doth rise.

Whoe'er for freedom fights and falls, his fame no blight

shall know, As long as spirits of the free through earth and air

shall go;

Through earth and air a spirit band of heroes moves

always, 'Tis near us at the dead of night and in the noontide's

blaze, In the storm that levels towering pines, and in the breeze

that waves With low and gentle breath the grass upon our fathers'

graves.

There's not a cradle in the bounds of Hellas broad and

fair, But the spirit of our free-born sires is surely hovering

there, It breathes in dreams of fairy-land upon the infant's

brain, And in his first sleep dedicates the child to manhood's

pain; Its summons lures the youth to stand, with new-born

joy possessed, Where once a freeman fell, and there it fires his thrill

ing breast,

And a shudder runs through all his frame; he knows

not if it be A throb of rapture, or the first sharp pang of

agony.

Come, swell our banners on the breeze, thou sacred spirit

band, Give wings to every warrior's foot and nerve to every

hand. We go to strike for freedom, to break the oppressor's

rod, We go to battle and to death for our country and our

God. Ye are with us, we hear your wings, we hear in magic

tone Your spirit-voice the pæan swell, and mingle with our

own.

Ye are with us, ye throng around — you from Ther

mopylæ, You from the verdant Marathon; you from the azure

sea, By the cloud-capped rocks of Mykale, at Salamis — all

you From field and forest, mount and glen, the land of Hel

las through.

Whoe'er for freedom fights and falls, his fame no blight

shall know, As long as through heaven's free expanse the breezes

freely bow, As long as in the forest wild the green leaves flutter

free, As long as rivers, mountain-born, roll freely to the sea, As long as free the eagle's wing, exulting, cleaves the

skies, As long as from a freeman's heart a freeman's breath doth rise.

- Translation of F. Max MÜLLER.

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