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THE CICERONIAN.

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PUBLISHED BY GOULD, KENDALL & LINCOLN, BOSTON,

OPINION OF THE PRESS.

From the Christian Review. The Ciceronian is based on the principles of a work published by Dr. Ernest Ruthardt of Bresleau. "The Prussian Minister of Education was so much pleased with it as to order a cop gymnasium in the kingdom; he at the same time called the attention of teachers to its merits, and the consequence has been, a very general approbation of the method, and its adoption in about a hundred gymnasia.

The book is peculiarly fitted for young learners, and is eminently adapted to make thorough linguists and independent scholars.

We recommend to all teachers of the languages, to avail themselves of the earliest opportunity to become acquainted with its contents.

From the Biblical Repository. Professor Sears is one of the ripest scholars, and we scarcely know a work accomplished by him, more important than the preparation of this little volume.

The only fear we have about it is, that it will not be appreciated, that teachers, care-loving teachers, will still prefer the old way with which they are familiar, so very few instructors are willing to take pains and spend time with their scholars.

The method explained in the Ciceronian is unquestionably the very best method of making effective Latin scholars. Would that it were commenced and pursued in all our schools.

From the Baptist Memorial. A work much needed ; our elementary books in Latin are meagre affairs; we have tried them in teaching, and felt how much there was yet to be attained in smoothing the pathway to the acquirement of the Latin tongue. We are ourselves using this book in instruction, and can confidently advise its adoption.

From the New England Puritan. This is an admirable work of the kind. The author very justly remarks that 'in languages, no less than in mathematics, those commentaries which give to the student the result without the labor of the process, are ruinous to scholarship. The literary gentlemen at Andover and Newton have laid our youthful linguists under many obligations, by furnishing the helps and creating a taste for a severe but successful prosecution of their studies.

From the Christian Watchman. This is a beautifully executed volume, and one which, if we mistake not, has long been a desideratum in the primary classical department of the schools of this country. We most cordially recommend the Ciceronian, both for its plan and its valuable selections, to classical teachers and students, and also to rusty graduates who may begin to find that it is time to repair some of the mistakes of their early classical training. With such we heartily sympathize.

THE

APOSTOLICAL

AND

PRIMITIVE CHURCH,

POPULAR IN ITS GOVERNMENT, AND SIMPLE

IN ITS WORSHIP.

BY

LYMAN COLEMAN,

AUTHOR OF 6 ANTIQUITIES OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH."

WITH AN INTRODUCTORY ESSAY,

BY

DR. AUGUSTUS NEANDER,

PROFESSOR OF THEOLOGY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF BERLIN.

Second Edition.

'BOSTON:
GOULD, KENDALL AND LINCOLN,

59 WASHINGTON STREET.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1844, by

GOULD, KENDALL & LINCOLN, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of Massachusetts.

ANDOVER:
ALLEN, MORRILL AND WARDWELL,

PRINTERS.

PRE FACE

TO THE FIRST EDITION.

olacy.

The object of the author, in the following work, is to commend to the consideration of the reader the admirable simplicity of the government and worship of the primitive church, in opposition to the polity and ceremonials of prelacy.

In the prosecution of this object, be has sought, under the direction of the best guides, to go to the original sources, and first and chiefly to draw from them. On the constitution and government of the church, none have written with greater ability, or with more extensive and searching erudition, than Mosheim, Planck, Neander and Rothe. These have been his principal reliance; and after these a great variety of authors.

If the reader object, that the authorities cited are beyond his reach, or are recorded in a language to him unknown, the writer can only say, that he has endeavored to collect the best authorities, wherever they might be found. When embodied in the pages of the work, they are given in a translation; and, if of special importance, the original is inserted in the margin, for the examination of the scholar.

The work has been prepared with an anxious endeavor to sustain the positions advanced, by references sufficiently copious, pertinent and authoritative ; and yet to guard against an ostentatious affectation in the accumulation of authorities. Several hundred have indeed been entered in these pages; but many more, that have fallen under the eye of the writer, have been rejected. Much labor, of which the reader probably will make small account, has been expended in an endeavor to authenticate those that are retained, and to give him an explicit direction to them. The work has been written with studied brevity, and a uniform endeavor to make it at once concise, yet complete, and suggestive of principles. .

In the prosecution of these labors, the author has received much encouragement and many important suggestions, from friends, whose services he holds in grateful remembrance. For such favors he is particularly indebted to Professor Park, of the Theological Seminary in this place.

Above all, it is the author's grateful duty publicly to express his acknowledgments to Dr. Neander, not only for his Introductory Essay, but for the uniform kindness of his counsels in the preparation of the several parts of this work. The writer can say nothing to add to the reputation of this eminent scholar, distinguished alike for his private virtues, his public services, and his vast and varied erudition. He can only express his obligations for the advantages derived from the contributions and counsels of this great historian, for which the reader, in common with the writer of the following pages, will owe his grateful acknowledgments. For the sentiments here expressed, however, the writer is alone responsible.

The translation of the Introduction was made in Berlin; and after a careful comparison with the original by Dr. Neander, received his unqualified approbation. It is, therefore, to be received as an authentic expression of his sentiments on the several topics to which it relates.

In the preparation of this work, the author has studiously sought to write neither as a Congregationalist, nor as a Presbyterian exclusively; but as the advocate of a free and popular government in the church; and of simplicity in worship, in harmony with the free spirit of the Christian religion. It is enough for the author, and, as he would hope, for both Congregationalists and Presbyterians, if the church is set free from the bondage of a prelatical hierarchy; and trained, by simple and expressive

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