On the Province of Methods of Teaching: A Professional Study

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C.W., Bardeen, 1879 - 376 oldal

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Educationprovince of From Varro
22
Educationprovince of From Hill
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Educationprovince of From Page
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Educationprovince of From Huxley
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Educationprovince of From Laurie
30
Educationprovince of From Bichter 84
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Education vs Teaching
43
Languagerepresents
44
Teachingmeaning of From the Greek
45
Teachingmeaning of From the Latin
47
Teachingmeaning of From the AngloSaxon
49
Same ideaillustrated From Jevons
51
Same ideaillustrated From Calderwood
52
Conception of Teacher limited to Persons
54
Teach Instruct Informdefined From Crabb
55
Authoritydefined From Crabb
60
Authority Consent Assent Beliefdefined From Fleming
61
Authoritygeneral discussion From Bacon
69
Recapitulation
77
Methoddefined
79
Methodrefers to subjectmatter
80
Methods of Businessillustrated From The Nation
81
Three distinct Elements in an Investigation1 Object matter the end 2 Way in which faculties pro ceed 3 State of Investigator
82
Objectmatter of Studyconsideredends in System
83
Ways of Procedure of MindconsideredAre modes of method
85
SECTION PACK 44 Analysis vs Separation
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b Synthesisdefined
87
Synthesis vs Reconstruction
88
c Generalizationdefined
89
e Inductiondefined
90
Induction vs Repetition
92
Deductiondefined
93
Marnier Systematized is Mode
94
IntroductionNeed of Better Methods From Maine
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Theory of Methods of Teachingbased upon Psychology and nature of subjectmatter
98
Objects and Limitations of Present Investigation
101
Knowingforms of knowledge From Ueberweg
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Form and Matter From Thompson
103
Form and Matter From Jevons
105
Form and Matter From Newman
107
Knowledge Learning Eruditiondefined FromCrabb
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Knowledgedefined From Day
110
Drill 164
111
Methods of Teaching do not regard Individuality
114
Teachingdenned
116
Principledefined From Fleming
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Methods of Teaching Examined in their Relation
136
Naturedefined Prom Cocker 193
140
Methods of Teachingnot responsible for Form
142
Methods of TeachingMisconception of occasions Mis use of the Expression
170
Mode Mannerdefined From Smith Mode Mannerused From The Nation
171
System Methoddefined From Smith Systemdefined From Jevons
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Method Modedefined From Armstrong
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Method Mode Mannerdifference a Illustrated hy Figure of a Bridge 6 Illustrated by Water as buoyingup power c Illustrated by Gravity Ani mal Pow...
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Modeproperly used From Page
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Methodimproperly used From Rousseau
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MethodSocratic Modeillustrated From Epictetus
178
SECTION PAGB
180
Methods of Teachingfor Modes and MannersCri tique upon From Meiklejohn
184
Illustration From McLennan
188
ArtificialConception of examined
190
Natural in general is not Natural in the Individual
192
Naturaldefined From Butler
193
riable From Cocker
194
Naturedefined From Fleming
196
NaturalInstance of From Epictetus
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Natural and Artificial Educationdiscriminated From Huxley
203
Psychological Phenomenaclassified 1 Phenomena of Cognitions 2 Phenomena of Feelings 3 Phe nomena of Conations From Hamilton
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Presentative Faculties From Hamilton
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MemoryFaculty of From Hamilton
207
Imagination From Hamilton
208
Regulative Faculty From Hamilton
209
Recapitulation of Cognitive Faculties From Hamilton
210
Will the Principal Faculty in acquiring Knowledge From Richter
211
Willsame idea From Laurie
213
Imaginationa The Poetic From Porter
214
Imaginationc The Ethical Uses of From Porter
216
Imaginationd Relation to Religious Faith From Porter
217
Imagination is Overdeveloped in the Youth of India From Maine
218
MemoryPermanence of From Grindon
221
MemoryRetains best from Contrasts From Richter
227
Memory and Cram From Maine
235
A On Method
243
Knowing Act ofdefined From Ueberweg
257
B On System
264
From Fleming 883
270
PowersMental employed in acquiring Knowledge
274
F On Abstraction
277
ThoughtSecond Gradation of is the Formation
288
From Smith 413
293
ThoughtThird Gradation of is SeasoningReason
296
Subjectmatterdefined
303
Illustrative TeachingAnalogous Extension of Mean
309
Mathematical Judgmentson Arithmetic Geometry
324
Additionon Discovering the Method of Teaching it
331
TeacherValue of CommonSense FromSidgwick
338
TeacherBest Talent for is Judging Right upon
344

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316. oldal - Euclid's, and show by construction that its truth was known to us ; to demonstrate, for example, that the angles at the base of an isosceles triangle are equal, and that if the equal sides be produced the angles on the other side of the base...
19. oldal - Suppose that an adult man, in the full vigour of his faculties, could be suddenly placed in the world, as Adam is said to have been, and then left to do as he best might. How long would he be left uneducated ? Not five minutes. Nature would begin to teach him, through the eye, the ear, the touch, the properties of objects. Pain and pleasure would be at his elbow telling him to do this and avoid that ; and by slow degrees the man would receive an education which, if narrow, would be thorough, real,...
47. oldal - Men sought truth in their own little worlds, and not in the great and common world'; for they disdain to spell and so by degrees to read in the volume of God's works; and contrariwise by continual meditation and agitation of wit do urge and as it were inyocate their own spirits to divine and give oracles unto them, whereby they are deservedly deluded.
139. oldal - The object of what we commonly call education— that education in which man intervenes and which I shall distinguish as artificial education— is to make good these defects in Nature's methods; to prepare the child to receive Nature's education, neither incapably nor ignorantly, nor with wilful disobedience; and to understand the preliminary symptoms of her pleasure, without waiting for the box on the ear. In short, all artificial education ought to be an anticipation of natural education.
295. oldal - Induction is that operation of the mind by which we infer that what we know to be true in a particular case or cases, will be true in all cases which resemble the former in certain assignable respects.
50. oldal - ... and seldom sincerely to give a true account of their gift of reason, to the benefit and use of men : as if there were sought in knowledge a couch whereupon to rest a searching and restless spirit ; or a terrace, for a wandering and variable mind to walk up and down with a fair prospect ; or a tower of state, for a proud mind to raise itself upon ; or a fort or commanding ground, for strife and contention ; or a shop, for profit or sale ; and not a rich storehouse, for the glory of the Creator,...
18. oldal - ... laws of Nature, under which name I include not merely things and their forces, but men and their ways; and the fashioning of the affections and of the will into an earnest and loving desire to move in harmony with those laws «•» For me, education means neither more nor less than this. Anything which professes to call itself education must be tried by this standard and if it fails to stand the test, I will not call it education, whatever may be the force of authority, or of numbers, upon the...
298. oldal - The thing that hath been, it is that which shall be; and that which is done is that which shall be done: and there is no new thing under the sun.
50. oldal - But this is that which will indeed dignify and exalt knowledge, if contemplation and action may be more nearly and straitly conjoined and united together than they have been; a conjunction like unto that of the two highest planets, Saturn, the planet of rest and contemplation, and Jupiter, the planet of civil society and action.
48. oldal - So it is in contemplation: if a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts; but if he will be content to begin with doubts, he shall end in certainties.

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