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PLAY LICENSING, IN THE TIME OF KING

CHARLES.

The disgusting and overstrained fastidiousness of our present licenser, whose delicacy cannot tolerate even passages of a decidedly loyal tendency, is not without example in the earlier times of our drama. These tasteless and officious personages have always been more ready to prove their authority than their judgment. The most delectable of them, Sir Henry Herbert, in his examination of “The Wits” of Davenant, had, it appears, marked a number of harmless interjections, which might have subjected the poet to some punishment; but Charles, who probably suspected his Master of the Revels of a tendency towards Puritanism, interfered, and Sir Henry has thus recorded his spleen and disappointment. “The King is pleased to take faith, death, 'slight, &c. for asseverations, and no oaths, to which I do humbly submit as my master's judgment; but, under favour, do conceive them to be oaths, and enter them here, to declare

my

submission and opinion.”

SPRANGER BARRY.

WHEN the affairs of the Dublin Theatre took

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PLAY LICENSING, IN THE TIME OF KING

CHARLES.

The disgusting and overstrained fastidiousness of our present licenser, whose delicacy cannot tolerate even passages of a decidedly loyal tendency, is not without example in the earlier times of our drama. These tasteless and officious personages have always been more ready to prove their authority than their judgment. The most delectable of them, Sir Henry Herbert, in his examination of “The Wits" of Davenant, had, it appears, marked a number of harmless interjections, which might have subjected the poet to some punishment; but Charles, who probably suspected his Master of the Revels of a tendency towards Puritanism, interfered, and Sir Henry has thus recorded his spleen and disappointment. * The King is pleased to take faith, death, 'slight, &c. for asseverations, and no oaths, to which I do humbly submit as my master's judgment; but, under favour, do conceive them to be oaths, and enter them here, to declare my submission and opinion.”

SPRANGER BARRY.

When the affairs of the Dublin Theatre took

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an unfavourable turn, and, unlike Mr. Sheridan, he left every department unpaid and unsatisfied, the

angry tradesmen used to besiege his door, vowing, that though they had frequently been paid off with words, this time they would not depart without their money. Mr. Barry would then desire to see them. A single claimant was admitted at a time. After a conference of some time, he returned with a pleased and satisfied countenance, to the anxious and expecting crowd of creditors below. Judging by the reception he had met, what was likely to be their own chance, he was eagerly interrogated by the gaping crowd.-" Well, you have seen Mr. Barry ?”—“Yes.”—“ You have got your money ?”—“No.”—“A part of it?". “Not one shilling. But Mr. Barry spoke to me so kindly-seemed so distressed to keep me waiting-promised me so faithfully, that, the next time I called, the money should be forthcoming that he has, I know not how, got the better of my anger, and I could not find it in my a gentleman any further.”

heart to press

BARON, THE FRENCH COMEDIAN; AND DOMI

NIQUE, THE HARLEQUIN.

Tue actors of the French Theatre were de

sirous that those of the Italian Theatre should speak nothing but French. The question was brought before Louis XIV.; and Baron and Dominique were appointed the advocates for each party. Baron was the famous actor, who had been educated by Moliere ; and Dominique was no less celebrated as a harlequin. When the former had ended his harangue, the King made a sign to Dominique to speak in turn. After various harlequinade antics, he addressed himself to the monarch, and asked -"In what language does your majesty command me to speak ?"“Speak as you please,” replied the King.--"That is exactly what I wish," answered Dominique ; “my cause is gained! I humbly thank your majesty." The King laughed heartily, at being thus entrapped. “My word is given," said he; "it cannot be recalled."

LINES

On Miss Paton's stipulation with the Covent Garden Manager,

that she should never be required to appear on the Stage in Male Attire.

That Paton, whose enchanting voice

Th’admiring town bewitches,
Should, of her own free will and choice,

Refuse to wear the breeches,

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