Literary Essays: Contributed to the Edinburgh Review, 2. kötet

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H. Milford, Oxford University Press, 1913 - 702 oldal
 

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304. oldal - What though the field be lost? All is not lost; the unconquerable will, And study of revenge, immortal hate, And courage never to submit or yield: And what is else not to be overcome?
183. oldal - For thou hast said in thine heart, I will ascend into heaven, I will exalt my throne above the stars of God...
95. oldal - The Son of man goeth, as it is written of him ; but woe unto that man by whom the Son of man is betrayed! it had been good for that man if he had not been born.
539. oldal - What the horns are to the buffalo, what the paw is to the tiger, what the sting is to the bee, what beauty, according to the old Greek song, is to woman, deceit is to the Bengalee. Large promises, smooth excuses, elaborate tissues of circumstantial falsehood, chicanery, perjury, forgery, are the weapons offensive and defensive of the people of the Lower Ganges.
608. oldal - India and its inhabitants were not to him, as to most Englishmen, mere names and abstractions, but a real country and a real people. The burning sun, the strange vegetation of the palm and the...
128. oldal - ... the eyes of all men were fixed upon him, as their patrite pater, and the pilot that must steer the vessel through the tempests and rocks which threatened it. And I am persuaded, his power and interest, at that time, was greater to do, good or hurt, than any man's in the kingdom, or than any man of his rank hath had in any time : for his reputation of honesty was universal, and his affections seemed so publicly guided, that no corrupt or private ends could bias them.
430. oldal - The same courier who carried this " soothing letter," as Clive calls it, to the Nabob, carried to Mr. Watts a letter in the following terms : " Tell Meer Jaffier to fear nothing. I will join him with five thousand men who never turned their backs. Assure him I will march night and day to his assistance, and stand by him as long as I have a man left.
623. oldal - ... public to hear him was unbounded. His sparkling and highly finished declamation lasted two days ; but the Hall was crowded to suffocation during the whole time. It was said that fifty guineas had been paid for a single ticket. Sheridan, when he concluded, contrived, with a knowledge of stage-effect which his father might have envied, to sink back, as if exhausted, into the arms of Burke, who hugged him with the energy of generous admiration.
295. oldal - We have often thought that the motion of the public mind in our country resembles that of the sea when the tide is rising. Each successive wave rushes forward, breaks, and rolls back ; but the great flood is steadily coming in.
424. oldal - Then^was_committed that great crime, memorable for its singular atrocity, memorable for the tremendous retribution by which it was followed. The English captives were left at the mercy of the guards, and the guards determined to secure them for the night in the prison of the garrison, a chamber known by the fearful name of the Black Hole..

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