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hare of the Russian steppes. There young shoots and leaves. It is this would be nothing very extraordinary in habit of hungry cattle which makes the the fact if social animals, such as deer, space under all trees in parks of the cattle, or antelopes, did gather quanti- same height,—that to which cattle can ties of long herbage, like the tall grasses lift their heads to bite the branches. of Central Africa or of the Indian When the wood or forest has been enswamps, and accumulate it for the bene- closed previously, the whole of this fit of the herd, and combine to protect it stock of food, reaching down to the from other herds, or if they reserved ground, instead of to the “cattle line,” is certain portions of the longer herbage at their service. In a paragraph quoted for food in winter. The latter would in the Globe of June 28th, from some reperhaps demand a greater range of marks of Sir Dietrich Brandis, lately concepts than the former. But the chief of the Forest Department of the brain-power of the improvident deer Indian empire, special mention is made must be equal to that of the squirrel or of the part played by this "reserve” in field-mouse, which seldom forget to lay the economy of animal famines in India. aside a “famine fund.” In temperate During the years of drought and famine climates, prolonged frost or snow is the in 1867 and 1868, the cattle (of all the only frequent cause of famine among inhabitants) were allowed to graze in either beasts or birds. This cause is not the Rajah's preserves at Rupnagar. constant, season by season, but it occurs The branches of the trees were cut for often enough in the lifetime of most fodder. The same was done in Kishanindividuals of the different species to garh, and a large proportion of the catimpress their memory by suffering. In tle of these two places were preserved the plains of India, and even more regu- during those terrible years. larly in the plains of Africa, the summer But there are regions, like the African heats cause partial famine to all her steppe, where the summer famines bivorous animals, and this condition is among anin are more frequent thai recurring and constant. Brehm has de- in India, and where there is little forest scribed the cumulative suffering of the available as a reserve store of food. animal world, of the “African steppe," Certain animals "trek” for great dismainly from famine, at the close of this tances to escape from the famine area. regular period of summer drought. We Birds leave it entirely. But the greater cannot supose that in this

the number of the quadrupeds stay and terror of starvation is wholly forgotten take their chance, the stronger of in the brief time of plenty. The neglect hunger, the weak of famine and death. to form any store, or to reserve pastures If we examine the stores made by in climates sufficiently temperate to most of the vegetable-eating animals spare them from being burnt up with which do lay by a "famine fund,” we summer heat, suggests the question find a rather curious similarity in the whether these “hand-to-mouth” herbiv- food commonly used by them. They orous animals rely on any natural re- nearly all live on vegetable substances serves of food not obvious to us. This in a concentrated form-natural foodis a natural device, just as the Kaffir, lozenges, which are very easily stored when his mealies fail, lives on roots and away. There is a great difference, for grubs, or the insect and vegetable eating example, between the bulk of nutriment rook becomes carnivorous in a drought. eaten in the form of grass by a rabbit, To some extent both deer and cattle do and the same amount of sustenance in rely on such reserves. When the grass the “special preparation” in the kernel is burnt up, trees are still luxuriant, and of a nut, or the stone of a peach, or the it is to the woods that the ruminant bulb of a crocus, off which a squirrel animals look as a reserve in famine. makes a meal. Nearly all the storing The fact was recognized during the animals eat concentrated food," siege of Paris, when all the trees of the whether it be beans and grain, hoarded boulevards and the parks were felled by the hamster, or nuts and hard fruits, late in September that the tens of thou- by the squirrel, nuthatch, and possibly sands of cattle might browse on the some of the jays. But there is one vege

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table-eating animal whose food is islation against being left to starve by neither concentrated nor easy to move. their owners. It is not often that the On the contrary, it is obtained with owner of any domesticated animal is so great labor in the first instance, and careless of his own interests as to do stored with no less toil after it is pro- so when the creature is capable of work, cured. The beaver lives during the or so inhuman if it is not. But instances winter on the bark of trees. As it is not do occur to the contrary. The law does safe, and often impossible, for the ani- recognize an implied right on the part mal to leave the water when the ice has of the animal to this exemption from the formed, it stores these branches under great curse of animal existence, if man water, cutting them into lengths, drag, has exacted from it a previous tribute in ging them below the surface, and fixing the form of work. But there is a borderthem down to the bottom with stones land of animal domestication in which and mud. This is more difficult work this implicit duty of man to beast is than gathering hay.

seriously neglected, partly because the Birds, in spite of their powers of loco work done by the animal is less obvious, notion, suffer greatly from famine. though the animal is kept for the profit Many species which could leave the of man. There are great areas of new famine area seem either deficient in the country in Argentina, the United States, instinct to move, or unwilling to do so. and Australia where the raising of Rooks, for instance, which

stock, whether sheep, cattle, or horses, known to migrate across the Channel is carried on without much regard to the and the North Sea, will hang about the limits set by famine in years of frost or same parish in bad droughts and suffer drought. The creatures are multiplied acutely, though they might easily move without regard to famine periods, and to places where water, if not food, is no reserve of food is kept to meet these. abundant. The frost famines mainly Natural laws are left to work in bad affect the insect-eating birds; and as times, and this "natural law” is death these live on animal food, which would by famine. Consequently, at the presnot keep, they could not be expected to ent time we hear of multitudes of starymake a store. But there is no such dif- ing horses on the ranches of Oregon, ference of possible food between birds and in Australia during a drought, or in which do make stores and birds which Argentina after protracted drought or do not. Why, for instance, should the cold, sheep and cattle die by tens of nuthatch and the Mexican woodpecker thousands by the most lingering of lay by for hard times while the rook deaths. There is something amiss here does not?

in the relations between man and beast Domestic animals in this country are which cannot be justified even on “busivery properly guaranteed by recent leg- ness” grounds.

are

now

Letters Dehyed by Bees.-An unusual rival of the rural postman to clear the sight was witnessed at Cranbrook, in letters; but, owing to the awkward posiKent, the other afternoon. A swarm of tion of the winged visitors, it was found bees settled on a pillar-box at Frizley, impossible to hive the bees until night, and soon afterwards a second swarm lo. when they were smoked and safely cated themselves inside the box, the housed. Owing to this unusual inciwhole colony following the queen dent, the letters posted before the bees through the aperture provided for let- took possession of the pillar-box were ters. Every preparation was made for delayed for several hours.-St. James's the capture of the swarm upon the ar- Gazette.

Sixth Series, Volume XV.

}

No. 2774-September 4, 1897.

From Beginning,

Vol. CCXIV.

CONTENTS.

Church Quarterly, i

627 634

044

053

I. IN NATURE'S WAGGISH MOOD. By

Paul Heyse. Tianslated for The Living

Age by Harriet Lieber Cohen. Part I. II. THE POETRY OF GEORGE MEREDITH, III. AN UNNOTED CORNER OF SPAIN. By Hannah Lynch,

Blackwood's Magazine,
IV. SOME REMINISCENCES OF ExGLISH

JOURNALISM. By Sir Wemyss Reid, Nineteenth Century,
V. EUROPE'S NEW INVALID. By John
Foreman,

National Review,
VI. THE TALE OF A GRECIAN Boy. By
Neil Wynn Williams,

Gentleman's Magazine, .
VII. THE NEW SAYINGS OF CHRIST. By M.
R. JAMES,

Contemporary Revievs,..
VIII. A TRAPPIST MONASTERY IN NATAL.
By Carlyle Smythe,

Chambers's Journal,
IX. BORDER ESSAYS,

Spectator, X. A POETIC TRIO,

Athenaum, XI. THE EARLY RISING FALLACY,

London Standard,

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671

675

680 68+ 686 687

POETRY.

.

THE DAY BEYOND,

626 | AN AMERICAN ECHO OF THE FAITH AND LOVE,

626 JUBII.EE, To ONE WHOSE LOVE LIES Dying 626

626

PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY BY

THE LIVING AGE COMPANY, BOSTON.

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION. For Six DOLLARS remitted directly to the Publishers, THE LIVING AGE will be punctually forwarded for a year, free of postage.

Remittances should be made by bank draft or check, cr by post-office money order, if possible. If neither of these can be procured, the money should be sent in a registered letter. All postmasters are obliged to register letters when requested to do so. Drafts, checks, and money orders should be made payable to the order of THE LIVING AGE CO.

Single copies of THE LIVING AGE. 15 cents.

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FAITH AND LOVE. The darkened chamber held the maiden

dead. Her name was Faith. Of long neglect sbc

died. And now men rose and shook themselves

and cried, O Faith, come back,-come back ere

Hope be fled!" But she lay silent on her solemn bed, And men grew piteous at their prayer

denied: They said "No more is man to man allied: We fall asunder-and the world," they

said. And while they talked, behold a gracious

form, And Love beside the pillow bending low: “We live and die together, she and I." So then he kissed her, and her flesh grew

warm: She woke and faced them with a ruddy

glow. If Love be living. Faith can never die.

EDWARD CRACROFT LEFROY,

TO ONE WHOSE LOVE LIES DYING. Fear Time, but fear not Death,

O fearful Lover; Death will thy Love to thee for e'er be

queath.

Time may discover How love with Time weighs little, And seeming trust, as crystal glass, is

brittle.

Fear Time, but fear not Death,

For death is sealing The lips for thee from which their fra

grant breath

His touch is stealing. Then fear not Death, O Lover; Time and not Death may flaw in her

discorer.

ELLA FULLER MAITLAND),

IN NATURE'S WAGGISH MOOD.1

beard and the strange figure might

easily have been taken for one of those BY PAUL HEYSE.

fabled elfs who grope their way through Trauslated for THE LIVING AGE by Harriet subterranean passages and there seLieber Cohen.

curely hide their mysterious treasures PART I.

from the eyes of men. The dark lan

tern, however, served a much more modIt was a wild autumn night. A cruel

est purpose; for, during his nocturnal fog seemed blowing from all four points rambles as often as the little night-bird of the compass at once. The streets

would meet a creature of ordinary size, were cleared of all pedestrians who had

—who naturally at once fell to wonderno urgent reason for being out-of-doors; ing what the child was doing out in the sentinels had crept into their sentry- street at such an hour,,he would press boxes, policemen had found shelter in

his finger on the round door of the lanwarm bar-rooms-their duties as cus

tern and hold the light aloft so that it todians of the peace always taking theni

would fall full on his own face; then at. away from their posts when such

a glance from those clear grey eyes, weather was abroad,--and yet in one of

that looked as though they knew quite the suburbs of the provincial town there

well what they were about, the inquisimight have been seen, on this night in

tive observer would pass on, reserving question, a tiny little figure walking us

his pity for a more needy object. With leisurely over the damp, oozy pave: the guards and policemen he seemed io. ments as though the most cloudless of

be on familiar terms, and they would summer skies had lured him forth by its call out cheerily in passing: “Good evenbeauty. The distant observer would ing, Mr. Hinze,” whereupon Mr. Hinze probably have taken the little piece of would as cheerily return the salutation humanity for a child of three or four

in a thin, high-pitched voice that was who had strayed from home and now,

very earnest and resolute withal. The frightened and perhaps fearing punish

he would proceed leisurely on his conment, was wandering aimlessly in the templative way, from time to time dark and fog. Closer approach, how

swinging his stick in the air and giving ever, aided by the flickering light from

an occasional lunge with it as though the corner street-lamp, would have he were a young student practising the shown that this was not the figure of a

tierce and carte with no one near to child. True, a pair of clear grey eyes criticise. looked out from under the broad

This inhospitable night, however, he brimmed black felt hat, and a round, had wandered for an hour in and out of rosy-cheeked face emerged from the

street and side street, meeting no other turned-up collar of a heavy brown over

living creature except a masterless dog, coat, but the chin had a straggling

wlio, wet and shivering, had brushed up growth of light brown beard, while close to him for some human comfort. crow's feet about the eyes and lines The emptiness of the street did not seem around the mouth, as well as the bold

to oppress him; on the contrary he and resolute expression on the finely would stand in revery before some halfchiselled features, gave unmistakable built house, or gaze long and intently at evidence that the small personage had

one of the gaudy, pretentious villas long since reached man's estate and that with balcony and terrace; then he would his stunted stature must have been

fall into a murmured soliloquy, give a caused by human mischance, or by na

low shrill whistle, that might have come ture with malice prepense.

from the lungs of a mouse, and move In his right hand the little man car

quietly on his way. ried a stick whose ferrule end sounded

It struck twelve from a neighboring a regular tick-tack on the plaster pave- church-tower

the noctambulist ment; the left bore a closed dark lan- turned into one of the broader thoroughtern, which strikingly enhanced his fares where the street-lamps made a gnome-like appearance. A long gray

more imposing display—the streaming 1 Copyright by The Living Age Company. sidewalks absorbing and reflecting their

as

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