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I wandered lonely'

I WANDERED lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o'er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils ;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.
Continuous as the stars that shine
And twinkle on the milky way,
They stretched in never-ending line,
Along the margin of a bay :
Ten thousand saw I at a glance,
Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.
The waves beside them danced ; but they
Out-did the sparkling waves in glee :
A poet could not but be gay,
In such a jocund company:
I gazed-and gazed—but little thought
What wealth the show to me had brought :

For oft, when on my couch I lie
In vacant or in pensive mood,
They flash upon that inward eye
Which is the bliss of solitude ;
And then my heart with pleasure fills,
And dances with the daffodils.

WORDSWORTH.

Hester

WHEN maidens such as Hester die,
Their place ye may not well supply,
Though ye among a thousand try,

With vain endeavour.
A month or more hath she been dead,
Yet cannot I by force be led
To think

upon
the

wormy bed
And her together.

A springy motion in her gait,
A rising step, did indicate
Of pride and joy no common rate,

That flushed her spirit.
I know not by what name beside
I shall it call :—if 'twas not pride,
It was a joy to that allied,

She did inherit.
Her parents held the Quaker rule,
Which doth the human feeling cool,
But she was train’d in Nature's school,

Nature had blest her.
A waking eye, a prying mind,
A heart that stirs, is hard to bind,
A hawk's keen sight ye cannot blind,

Ye could not Hester.
My sprightly neighbour ! gone before
To that unknown and silent shore,
Shall we not meet, as heretofore,

Some Summer morning,
When from thy cheerful eyes a ray
Hath struck a bliss upon the day,
A bliss that would not go away,
A sweet fore-warning ?

LAMB.

To Evening IF aught of oaten stop, or pastoral song, May hope, chaste Eve, to soothe thy modest ear,

Like thy own brawling springs,

Thy springs, and dying gales ; O Nymph reserved, while now the bright-hair'd sun Sits in yon western tent, whose cloudy skirts,

With brede ethereal wove,

O'erhang his wavy bed :
Now air is hush’d, save where the weak-eyed bat
With short shrill shriek flits by on leathern wing,

Or where the beetle winds
His small but sullen horn,

As oft he rises midst the twilight path,
Against the pilgrim borne in heedless hum :-

Now teach me, maid composed
To breathe some soften'd strain,

Whose numbers, stealing through thy darkening vale,
May not unseemly with its stillness suit ;

As, musing slow, I hail
Thy genial loved return !

For when thy folding-star arising shows
His paly circlet, at his warning lamp

The fragrant Hours, and Elves

Who slept in buds the day, And many a Nymph who wreathes her brows with sedge And sheds the freshening dew, and, lovelier still,

The pensive Pleasures sweet,

Prepare thy shadowy car.
Then let me rove some wild and heathy scene ;
Or find some ruin midst its dreary dells,

Whose walls more awful nod

By thy religious gleams.
Or, if chill blustering winds, or driving rain
Prevent my willing feet, be mine the hut,

That from the mountain's side,

Views wilds, and swelling floods,
And hamlets brown, and dim-discover'd spires ;
And hears their simple bell, and marks o'er all

Thy dewy fingers draw

The gradual dusky veil.
While Spring shall pour his showers, as oft he wont,
And bathe thy breathing tresses, meekest Eve!

While Summer loves to sport

Beneath thy lingering light;
While sallow Autumn fills thy lap with leaves ;
Or Winter, yelling through the troublous air,

Affrights thy shrinking train,
And rudely rends thy robes;

So long, regardful of thy quiet rule,
Shall Fancy, Friendship, Science, smiling Peace,

Thy gentlest influence own,
And love thy favourite name !

W. COLLINS.

The Sun upon the Weirdlaw Hill
THE sun upon the Weirdlaw Hill,

In Ettrick's vale, is sinking sweet ;
The westland wind is hush and still,

The lake lies sleeping at my feet. Yet not the landscape to mine eye

Bears those bright hues that once it bore ; Though evening, with her richest dye,

Flames o'er the hills of Ettrick's shore. With listless look along the plain,

I see Tweed's silver current glide, And coldly mark the holy fane

Of Melrose rise in ruin'd pride. The quiet lake, the balmy air,

The hill, the stream, the tower, the tree, Are they still such as once they were ?

Or is the dreary change in me? Alas, the warp'd and broken board,

How can it bear the painter's dye !
The harp of strain’d and tuneless chord,

How to the minstreľs skill reply !
To aching eyes each landscape lowers,

To feverish pulse each gale blows chill ;
And Araby's or Eden's bowers
Were barren as this moorland hill.

Scott.

The Wife of Usher's Well

THERE lived a wife at Usher's Well,

And a wealthy wife was she ;
She had three stout and stalwart sons,

And sent them o'er the sea.

They hadna been a week from her,

A week but barely ane,
When word came to the carline wife,

That her three sons were gane.
They had not been a week from her,

A week but barely three,
When word came to the carline wife,

That her sons she'd never see.

"I wish the wind may never cease,

Nor fishes in the flood,
Till my three sons come hame to me,

In earthly flesh and blood !'
It fell about the Martinmas,

When nights are lang and mirk,
The carline wife's three sons came hame

And their hats were o' the birk.

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It neither grew in syke nor ditch,

Nor yet in ony sheugh; But at the gates o' Paradise

That birk grew fair eneugh.
* Blow up the fire, my maidens !

Bring water from the well !
For a' my house shall feast this night,
Since

my

three sons are well !' And she has made to them a bed,

She's made it large and wide ;
And she's ta’en her mantle her about ;

Sat down at the bed-side.

Up then crew the red red cock,

And up and crew the gray ; The eldest to the youngest said,

"'Tis time we were away!'
The cock he hadna craw'd but once,

And clapp'd his wings at a',
Whan the youngest to the eldest said

• Brother, we must awa'.

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