Oldalképek
PDF
ePub

Sleep COME, Sleep! O Sleep, the certain knot of peace,

The baiting-place of wit, the balm of woe, The poor man's wealth, the prisoner's release,

Th’indifferent judge between the high and low ; With shield of proof shield me from out the press

Of those fierce darts Despair at me doth throw : O make in me those civil wars to cease ;

I will good tribute pay, if thou do so.
Take thou of me smooth pillows, sweetest bed,

A chamber deaf of noise and blind of light,
A rosy garland and a weary head:

And if these things, as being thine in right, Move not thy heavy grace, thou shalt in me, Livelier than elsewhere, Stella's image see.

SIR PHILIP SIDNEY.

Hymn for the Dead
THAT day of wrath, that dreadful day,
When heaven and earth shall pass away!
What
power

shall be the sinner's stay ?
How shall he meet that dreadful day?
When, shrivelling like a parched scroll,
The flaming heavens together roll;
When louder yet, and yet more dread,
Swells the high trump that wakes the dead !
Oh! on that day, that wrathful day,
When man to judgment wakes from clay,
Be Thou the trembling sinner's stay,
Though heaven and earth shall pass away!

SIR W. SCOTT.

The Poplar Field
THE poplars are felld; farewell to the shade,
And the whispering sound of the cool colonnade !
The winds play no longer and sing in the leaves,
Nor Ouse on his bosom their image receives.

Twelve years have elapsed since I last took a view
Of my favourite field, and the bank where they grew ;
And now in the grass behold they are laid,
And the tree is my seat that once lent me a shade!

The blackbird has fled to another retreat,
Where the hazels afford him a screen from the heat,
And the scene where his melody charm'd me before
Resounds with his sweet flowing ditty no more.
My fugitive years are all hasting away,
And I must ere long lie as lowly as they,
With a turf on my breast, and a stone at my head,
Ere another such grove shall arise in its stead.
'Tis a sight to engage me, if anything can,
To muse on the perishing pleasures of man;
Short-lived as we are, our pleasures, I see
Have a still shorter date, and die sooner than we.

W. COWPER.

Winter

When icicles hang by the wall,

And Dick the shepherd blows his nail,
And Tom bears logs into the hall,

And milk comes frozen home in pail,
When blood is nipt, and ways be foul,
Then nightly sings the staring owl,

Tuwhoo!
Tuwhit ! tuwhoo! A merry note !
While greasy Joan doth keel the pot.
When all around the wind doth blow,

And coughing drowns the parson's saw,
And birds sit brooding in the snow,

And Marian's nose looks red and raw,
When roasted crabs hiss in the bowl,
Then nightly sings the staring owl,

Tuwhoo!
Tuwhit! tuwhoo! A merry note !
While greasy Joan doth keel the pot.

SHAKESPEARE.

a

Annabel Lee
It was many and many a year ago,

In a kingdom by the sea,
That a maiden there lived whom you may know

By the name of Annabel Lee;
And this maiden she lived with no other thought

Than to love and be loved by me.
I was a child, and she was a child,

In this kingdom by the sea ;
But we loved with a love that was more than love,

I and my Annabel Lee ;
With a love that the winged seraphs of heaven

Coveted her and me.
And this was the reason that, long ago,

In this kingdom by the sea,
A wind blew out of a cloud, chilling

My beautiful Annabel Lee;
So that her high-born kinsmen came

And bore her away from me,
To shut her up in a sepulchre

In this kingdom by the sea.
The angels, not half so happy in heaven,

Went envying her and me;
Yes !-that was the reason (as all men know,

In this kingdom by the sea)
That the wind came out of the cloud by night,

Chilling and killing my Annabel Lee.
But our love it was stronger by far than the love

Of those who were older than we

Of many far wiser than we;
And neither the angels in heaven above,

Nor the demons down under the sea,
Can ever dissever my soul from the soul

Of the beautiful Annabel Lee.
For the moon never beams, without bringing me dreams

Of the beautiful Annabel Lee;
And the stars never rise, but I see the bright eyes

Of the beautiful Annabel Lee;

F

And so, all the night-tide, I lie down by the side
Of my darling--my darling-my life and my bride

In her sepulchre there by the sea,
In her tomb by the sounding sea.

PoE.

To Mary

IF I had thought thou couldst have died,

I might not weep for thee;
But I forgot, when by thy side,

That thou couldst mortal be :
It never through my mind had past

The time would e'er be o'er,
And I on thee should look my last,

And thou shouldst smile no more !
And still upon that face I look,

And think 'twill smile again;
And still the thought I will not brook

That I must look in vain !
But when I speak—thou dost not say,

What thou ne'er left'st unsaid ;
And now I feel, as well I may,

Sweet Mary! thou art dead.
If thou wouldst stay, e'en as thou art,

All cold and all serene-
I still might press thy silent heart,

And where thy smiles have been !
While e'en thy chill, bleak corse I have,

Thou seemest still mine own;
But there I lay thee in thy grave-

And I am now alone!
I do not think, where'er thou art,

Thou hast forgotten me ;
And I, perhaps, may soothe this heart,

In thinking too of thee :
Yet there was round thee such a dawn

Of light ne'er seen before,
As fancy never could have drawn,
And never can restore !

C. Wolfe.

Twist ye, Twine ye

Twist ye, twine ye ! even so,
Mingle shades of joy and woe,
Hope, and fear, and peace, and strife,
In the thread of human life.

While the mystic twist is spinning,
And the infant's life beginning,
Dimly seen through twilight bending,
Lo, what varied shapes attending !
Passions wild, and follies vain,
Pleasures soon exchanged for pain ;
Doubt, and jealousy, and fear,
In the magic dance appear.
Now they wax, and now they dwindle,
Whirling with the whirling spindle.
Twist ye, twine ye ! even so,
Mingle human bliss and woe.

Scott.

To Lucasta, on going to the Wars

TELL me not (sweet) I am unkind,

That from the nunnery
Of thy chaste breast and quiet mind,

To war and arms I fly.

True : a new mistress now I chase,

The first foe in the field ;
And with a stronger faith embrace

A sword, a horse, a shield.

Yet this inconstancy is such,

As you too shall adore ;
I could not love thee, Dear, so much,
Lov'd I not onour more.

COLONEL LOVELACE.

« ElőzőTovább »