Oldalképek
PDF
ePub

He, who from zone to zone Guides through the boundless sky thy certain flight, In the long way that I must tread alone, Will lead my steps aright.

W. C. BRYANT.

So, We'll Go no More a Roving

I

So, we'll go no more a roving

So late into the night,
Though the heart be still as loving,
And the moon be still as bright.

II

For the sword outwears its sheath,

And the soul wears out the breast,
And the heart must pause to breathe,

And love itself have rest.

III

Though the night was made for loving,

And the day returns too soon,
Yet we'll go no more a roving
By the light of the moon.

BYRON.

Song
WHERE the bee sucks, there suck I :
In a cowslip's bell I lie ;
There I couch, when owls do cry :
On the bat's back I do fly
After summer merrily.

Merrily, merrily, shall I live now,

Under the blossom that hangs on the bough! Come unto these yellow sands,

And then take hands :
Courtsied when you have and kiss'd

The wild waves whist,

Foot it featly here and there ;
And, sweet Sprites, the burthen bear.

Hark, hark !

Bow-wow.
The watch-dogs bark :

Bow-wow.

Hark, hark! I hear
The strain of strutting chanticleer
Cry, Cock-a-diddle-dow !

SHAKESPEARE.

The Land o' the Leal

I'M wearin' awa', Jean,
Like snaw-wreaths in thaw, Jean,
I'm wearin' awa'

To the land o’the leal.
There's nae sorrow there, Jean,
There's neither cauld nor care, Jean,
The day is aye

fair
In the land o' the leal.

Ye were aye leal and true, Jean,
Your task's ended noo, Jean,
And I'll welcome you

To the land o' the leal.
Our bonnie bairn's there, Jcan,
She was baith guid and fair, Jean ;
O we grudged her right sair

To the land o' the leal.
Then dry that tearfu' e'e, Jean,
My soul langs to be free, Jean,
And angels wait on me

To the land o' the leal.
Now fare ye weel, my ain Jean,
This warld's care is vain, Jean ;
We'll meet and aye be fain
In the land o' the leal.

LADY NAIRNE.

Song of the Emigrants in Bermuda

WHERE the remote Bermudas ride
In the ocean's bosom unespied,
From a small boat that row'd along
The listening winds received this song :
“What should we do but sing His praise
That led us through the watery maze
Where He the huge sea-monsters wracks
That lift the deep upon their backs,
Unto an isle so long unknown,
And yet far kinder than our own ?
He lands us on a grassy stage,
Safe from the storms, and prelate's rage :
He gave us this eternal spring
Which here enamels everything,
And sends the fowls to us in care
On daily visits through the air.
He hangs in shades the orange bright
Like golden lamps in a green night,
And does in the pomegranates close
Jewels more rich than Ormus shows :
He makes the figs our mouths to meet,
And throws the melons at our feet ;
But apples plants of such a price,
No tree could ever bear them twice!
With cedars chosen by his hand
From Lebanon he stores the land ;
And makes the hollow seas that roar
Proclaim the ambergris on shore.
He cast (of which we rather boast)
The Gospel's pearl upon our coast ;
And in these rocks for us did frame
A temple where to sound His name.
O let our voice His praise exalt
Till it arrive at Heaven's vault,
Which then perhaps rebounding may
Echo beyond the Mexique bay!'
-Thus sung they in the English boat
A holy and a cheerful note :
And all the way, to guide their chime,
With falling oars they kept the time.

A. MARVELL.

The Light of Other Days
OFT in the stilly night

Ere slumber's chain has bound me,
Fond Memory brings the light
Of other days around me :

The smiles, the tears

Of boyhood's years,
The words of love then spoken ;

The eyes that shone,

Now dimmed and gone,
The cheerful hearts now broken !
Thus in the stilly night

Ere slumber's chain has bound me,
Sad Memory brings the light

Of other days around me.
When I remember all

The friends so link'd together
I've seen around me fall
Like leaves in wintry weather,

I feel like one

Who treads alone
Some banquet-hall deserted,

Whose lights are fled,

Whose garlands dead,
And all but he departed!
Thus in the stilly night

Ere slumber's chain has bound me,
Sad Memory brings the light
Of other days around me.

T. MOORE.

The Fire of Drift-Wood WE sat within the farm-house old,

Whose windows, looking o'er the bay, Gave to the sea-breeze, damp and cold,

An easy entrance, night and day. Not far away we saw the port,

The strange, old-fashioned, silent town, The light-house, the dismantled fort,

The wooden houses, quaint and brown. We sat and talked until the night,

Descending, filled the little room ; Our faces faded from the sight,

Our voices only broke the gloom. We spake of many a vanished scene,

Of what we once had thought and said, Of what had been, and might have been,

Anil who was changed, and who was dead; And all that fills the hearts of friends,

When first they feel, with secret pain,
Their lives thenceforth have separate ends,

And never can be one again.
The first light swerving of the heart,

That words are powerless to express,
And leave it still unsaid in part,

Or say it in too great excess. The very tones in which we spake

Had something strange, I could but mark; The leaves of memory seemed to make

A mournful rustling in the dark. Oft died the words upon our lips,

As suddenly, from out the fire Built of the wreck of stranded ships,

The flames would leap and then expire. And, as their splendour flashed and failed,

We thought of wrecks upon the main,Of ships dismasted, that were hailed

And sent no answer back again. The windows, rattling in their frames,

The ocean, roaring up the beach, The gusty blast, the bickering flames,

All mingled vaguely in our speech ; Until they made themselves a part

Of fancies floating through the brain, The long-lost ventures of the heart,

That send no answers back again.

« ElőzőTovább »