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attend strictly to the Rules of the Bank to which they belong, as to the time and place of payment, and the person to whom the deposits are paid." It may be perhaps some trouble for å poor man to go himself to the Bank just at the time when it is open; but it must be much more satisfactory to him, and much more safe, to see the money paid into the hands of the managers, and to have their receipt for it, than to trust it to the secretary or any body else, out of Banking hours.

In some villages indeed, at a distance from a Saving Bank, a respectable person is appointed to receive deposits, and a proper receipt is signed at the next meeting; and this becomes a regular way of doing business, in which we consider all to be safe; but this is different from trusting money into the hands of those who have no authority to receive it. The bad conduct of one or two individuals, ought not however to bring a suspicion on secretaries in general, who, for the most part, have conducted the affairs of these banks with great diligence and exactness. We do not indeed, see exactly how a fraud can be committed, if all parties are watchful. These occasional misfortunes may however in the end be of use,

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On the Advantages of Industry. 311,

JH.
So longs the weary, fainting mind,

Opprest with sins and woes, .
Some soul-reviving spring to find,
Whence heav'nly comfort flows.

IV.
· Grateful those consolations are,

Thy promises impart:
There, flowing streanis of life appear,
To cheer the fainting heart.

Mks. SteeLE.
May 22nd, 1825.

P. P. G.

On the Advantages and Necessity of a habit of per

severing Industry in all human Studies and Pur

suits. It was the unalterable decree of the Almighty, that whatever is necessary and useful for life, should be obtained by labour; and, that without it, we should not reap any of those benefits which our condition requires. Almost every circumstance of life shews this. It is indeed reasonable to suppose, that we were not created to continue in a state of inactivity. Nature has assigned to each his peculiar talent, which ought to be exerted in that occupation to which it is adapted, and if difficulties may sometimes oppose his course, they are only intended to rouse the mind and body into action. We are all like the children in the Balearic Islands, who were not permitted to have their meal, till their skilfulness in slinging could bring it from the tree in which it was placed. We are indebted for the bread we eat to the baker, the miller, the reaper, the sower, and the plough-boy; and those utensils of husbandry necessary to prepare the earth for the reception of the seed, have derived their present

utility from the labour and the ingenuity of the smith. The commonest things are perfected by · labour; even a pin passes through a great variety

of hands before it is completed. The constitution both of our minds and bodies, requires exertion to keep them in order: this exertion produces the most beneficial effects. The conveniences of life are enlarged, the arts are improved. The uncultivated mind is like a waste, which bears no other fruit than wild berries, whilst the cultivated mind resembles the fertility and variety of our productive gardens. The youth cannot expect to make any progress in knowledge without diligence. If his profession is to be that of a scholar, he must be laborious, steadily pursuing one single point.

It is the same with the youthful female, she has her attainments to pursue, they are of a less active kind, but not less necessary to her own comfort, and the comfort and happiness of others. By a continual hạbit of persevering in whatever we undertake, we shall be able to overcome great difficulties. Like the constant drops of water, which wears a hole in the hard rock, perseverance makes impression on the hardest substances. : .

... .

"Many strokes, tho' with a little axe.
“Hew down and fell the hardest timbered óak."

I

Industry. may have something humble in the ...sound, but it is more certain in its success, than all

the sudden efforts of a lively and presuming genius. The one is like the tortoise, the other like the hare mentioned in the fable. : Though their powers of swiftness are different, the heavier animal proceeds on without loitering, he thinks of nothing but the end, he loses not one moment allotted to the race, while the fleet creature is confident and idle, plays aud frolics in the way, forgets that he has a race to run, that the time is passing on,-till the opportunity is lost. ...

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: ON “NO. How many of our nuisfortunes might be prevented if we could each of us learn to say that little word, “No!"

I remember, when I was a boy, an incident took place which I have remembered ever since, and which serves to shew the importance of the above little word. .

In our village, there lived a very fine young fellow named Jones. He was one of those who could never say “ No." It happened that a recruiting sergeant came there, to enlist soldiers ; and heing pleased with the appearance of young Jones, be asked him into the public house where he was drinking. Jones did not say “ No," but entered in. Being a sober lad, but not able to say “ No," he soon got tipsy. He then enlisted. He went abroad, and not knowing how to say “No;" got into bad company. The last I heard of him was, that he was in gaol, under sentence of death, for sheep-stealing. I have since heard that, through the influence of his friends, his sentence was mitigated to transportation for life. Before his reprieve arrived, he spoke to some friends who came to see him in prison, to the following effect: . .

"My ruin has been, that I never took resolution enough to say No. All my.crimes might have been avoided, could the word 'No' have been pronounced. But not being able to say 'No' to a merry companion, (even when he invited me to commit a crime), I thus became his accomplice." .. : Reader, think on the fate of Jones, and doubt not the truth of it. . · Take courage to say "No."......... inter

.. . G. U. B. No. 55. VOL. V. P

utility from the labour and the ingenuity of the smith. The commonest things are perfected by · labour; even a pin passes through a great variety

of hands before it is completed. The constitution both of our minds and bodies, requires exertion to keep them in order: this exertion produces the most beneficial effects. The conveniences of life are enlarged, the arts are improved. The uncultivated mind is like a waste, which bears no other fruit than wild berries, whilst the cultivated mind resembles the fertility and variety of our productive gardens. The youth cannot expect to make any progress in knowledge without diligence. If his profession is to be that of a scholar, he must be laborious, steadily pursuing one single point.

It is the same with the youthful female, she has her attainments to pursue, they are of a less active kind, but not less necessary to ber own comfort, and the comfort and happiness of others. By a continual habit of persevering in whatever we undertake, we shall be able to overcome great difficulties. Like the constant drops of water, which wears a hole in the hard rock, perseverance makes impression on the hardest substances. ; :“Many strokes, tho' with a little axe, " .

“Hew down and fell the hardest timbered óak." Industry may have something humble in the sound, but it is more certain in its success, than all the sudden efforts of a lively and presuming genius. The one is like the tortoise, the other like the hare mentioned in the fable. : Though their powers of swiftness are different, the heavier animal proceeds on without loitering, he thinks of nothing but the end, he loses not one moment allotted to the race, while the fleet creature is confident and idle, plays and frolics in the way, forgets that he has a race to run, that the time is passing on, -till the opportunity is lost..oni.

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