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THE CORRECT SOLUTION WILL BE PRINTED IN OUR ISSUE

OF MAY 9, 1925.

THE LIVING AGE, 8 Arlington Street, Boston

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THE ASCENDING LIFE. RICHARD ROBERTS, D.D.

75 cents Like a breath from the hills is this call to look up, and climb still higher.

Books

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SAINTS AND LADIES. CLARISSA SPENCER.

$1.50 A backward look at what "those blessed women'' of the centuries did, in and for the Church, with a glimpse of what possibilities lie before them

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this exquisite book for Easter giving. A STRING OF CHINESE PEARLS. WELTHY HONSINGER FISHER. $1.00

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THE $2000 HAWES PRIZE STORY

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The SCARLET COCKEREL

By CLIFFORD M. SUBLETTE This book has won the $2000 prize offered in memory of Charles Boardman Hawes, for an adventure tale of the same general character as the splendid stories of Mr. Hawes, author of The Mutineers, The Great Quest and The Dark Frigate. This sixteenth-century novel of lively adventure in France and the New World is indeed a worthy successor to the work of Mr. Hawes.

Frontispiece. $2.00

Among the scores of manuscripts submitted in the Hawes Prize Contest, two were of such outstanding merit that they were retained

for publication. These are
OLD BRIG'S

THE CLUTCH
CARGO

OF THE CORSICAN
By Dr. Honry A. Pulaford

By Alfrod H, Bill A New England lad goes treasure hunting for the old A stirring tale of the adventures of a group of Ameribrig's cargo in the brave days of sailing vessels eighty cans caught in France at the time of the Napoleonic wars. years ago. A real sea thriller. Illustrated. $2.00

Illustrated. $2.00

8 Arlington St.

THE ATLANTIC MONTHLY BOOK SHOP BOSTON April 4, 1925

Vol. 325

CONTENTS

No. 4213

1

7

11

17

22

.

28

38

Around the World in March
Chile and Her President

President Alessandri's Speech at a Paris Banquet, Preceded by an Explanation

of His Political Vicissitudes, by a Chilean Professor What I Learned in Germany

LUDOVIC NAUDEAU
A Leader of the French Press-World Revisits Germany on a Fog-Clearing

Mission
Without Prejudice

MARGOT ASQUITH
Mrs. Asquith Discourses of Herself and Her Acquaintances, with a Few Anec-

dotes for Good Measure Nordic or Not?

Hilaire Belloc and a Leading Medical Journalist, Writing Anonymously, Dis

cuss a Moot Question from Varying Angles From the Sahara to the Sea. III

HENRI DE KERILLIS
By Motor and Rail through a Black Voodoo Empire
Recollections of Tennyson WILLINGHAM FRANKLIN RAWNSLEY

Personal Memories of the Poet Laureate by a Survivor of His Larger Family

Circle
The Hopi Snake-Dance

. D. H. LAWRENCE
An English Poet Observes Americans, White and Red
Totota

MANUEL UGARTE
A Story of Old Buenos Aires, by an Argentine Poet and Publicist
The Spoon-Fed Age

THE VERY REVEREND W. R. INGE
A Modern Jeremiah Upbraids His Generation

for Its Lazy Minds and Bodies A Bedouin Raid

GRETE DIEL
Desert Skirmishes Midway between the Palestine Armies
Pantheism

WILFRID THORLEY
A Poem
Life, Letters, and the Arts

Warming Over Strindberg World Trade in the Bronze Age - The
Story of a Mill Boiler - Epitaphs on the Prehistoric - The Oldest

Opera - Dickens and the Gnats
The Book of the Month.

47

.

57

63

67

73

74

78

.

THIS WEEK

From now on this page is going to be re- thing in the end. This vigorous republic is spectable. No more puns, no more cheap inhabited by Latins and exploited by flippancy, no more competition with the Nordics

Nordics — though the Latins are beginning witty gentleman from Scribner's on the to wake up. They started to express their back cover. Here we are in the magazine, disgust in the conventional South Ameriand here we mean to stay, even if we have can way and held a successful Revolution. to be refined to achieve our purpose. Soon after, President Alessandri was off on

a speaking-tour in Europe. Glancing through this issue - and it's a good one, if we do say so - the alert Ludovic Naudeau is another anxious reader will find his attention attracted by Latin. He was led around behind the scenes such words as 'Nordic,''Race,' and 'Spoon- in Germany, and has a startling tale to tell. Fed Age.' The plump Mr. Belloc does not By establishing the Rentenmark the hungry care for Nordics, with their blond, long, haggard Teuton of 1923 is transformed empty heads. Dean Inge, the Jeremiah of into the hustling healthy German of 1925. London who will soon be bringing his He has factories, ships, a big export-busiMessage of Gloom over to the States, ness, and a high birth-rate - all of which evidently thinks we are not Nordic enough. reminds Frenchmen unpleasantly of 1914. D. H. Lawrence, himself a Nordic gone Latin, as you might say, finds diversion and literary inspiration among the Hopi Indians Tennyson and Margot Asquitb her of Arizona, who dance about with rattle- new name of Lady Oxford sticks in one's snakes clenched between their teeth.

throat

are a strange pair, and it is a Well, they 're not spoon-fed, at all events.

wonder that the magazine does not fall
apart with such a clash of personalities

going on between its modest covers. Henri de Kerillis, the direct opposite of Margot is her old self, as full of entertaining Mr. Lawrence and a Latin gone Nordic, gossip as a small-town postmistress, as well has been visiting savage tribes too, only posted on the affairs of the day as the his were in the Sahara, where men are British Foreign Secretary. Tennyson's sheiks and women live in harems. M. de charm is of a different order. He seems Kerillis regards these people with mixed somehow a trifle out of date to this

generaemotions, but with approval on the whole, tion of Lytton Stracheys and F. Scott for who is a Frenchman to object to polyg- Fitzgeralds; but Willingham Franklin amy? And, besides, they provide a novel Rawnsley, an old friend and cousin-in-law, sort of spectacle. Grete Diel you can tells stories of the late laureate, starting make your own pun on that name

has in 1850, when Tennyson was munching sage nothing at all to say in extenuation of the at the Rawnsleys' after breakfast, and atrocious behavior of the Bedouins, who going right down to 1892, when Mrs. conducted such a fierce raid on the wounded Rawnsley laid a single wreath on the poet's Germans whom she was nursing in Pales- tomb in Westminster Abbey. tine that even the English forgot the war for a few hours and helped out their fellow Nordics in distress.

All of which is somewhat removed from the Nordics. But then we have the word of

A Leading British Authority' that anyBut to change the subject to non-Nordics, body who presumes to talk about race is look at Chile or rather look at the two talking through his hat — and who are we articles on Chile, for it amounts to the same

to deny it?

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RATHER notably, three of the four He seems to have caught the idea that prominent men who passed off the China's national problem is social as stage of public life abroad last month well as political; and this is a fruitful were Socialists. President Ebert's death thought likely to seem more important removes a moderator of the Republic to-morrow than it does to-day. whose loss is felt by practically all Foreign comment upon President Parties in Germany. Seldom has a Coolidge's inaugural address dwelt man occupying a high post involving chiefly upon the religious tone of his so many contentious possibilities won message. The Radical New Statesman such general esteem. Hjalmar Brant- waxes sarcastic: ing, like Ebert, was a man whom post

'Almost Puritan uprightness' is a good war problems brought to the fore. It does not minimize his distinguished tion of the more exalted passages of the

phrase; but it is a very inadequate descripcareer in Sweden to credit his inter- speech. ‘America,' said the President, national reputation chiefly to his serv- 'seeks no earthly empire built on blood and ices at Geneva. He too was a mod- force. No ambition, no temptation, lures erating influence, an exponent of her to the thought of foreign dominions. sanity and balance in the feverish trib- The legions she sends forth are armed, not ulations of war-torn Europe. Lord

with the sword, but with the Cross. She Curzon's death removes a pillar of the

cherishes no purpose save to merit the favor old diplomacy, a defender of the tradi

of Almighty God.' We do not think we

have heard anything quite like that since tional conception of empire, who dis

the war days when Horatio Bottomley and trusted to the last the internationalist

the German Kaiser were in full throat. tendencies of the present age. Sun Yat-sen's name will be permanently

The Manchester Guardian is more identified with the history of China, appreciative: although he may be finally rated the

In his concluding passage, Mr. Coolidge Thomas Paine rather than the Alexan

strikes a note that will be heard with deep der Hamilton — and certainly not the feeling in countless American homes. His George Washington — of the Republic. country, he declares, ‘cherishes no purpose

Copyright 1925, by the Living Age Co.

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