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And where is that band who so vauntingly swore

That the havoc of war and the battle's confusion A home and a country should leave us no more? Their blood has washed out their foul footsteps' pol

lution. 5 No refuge could save the hireling and slave From the terror of flight, or the gloom of the grave; And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave O'er the land of the free, and the home of the brave.

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Oh, thus be it ever, when freemen shall stand

Between their loved homes and the war's desolation ! Blest with vict'ry and peace, may the heaven-rescued

land Praise the Pow'r that hath made and preserved us a

nation. Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just,

And this be our motto In God is our trust": 15 And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave

O'er the land of the free, and the home of the brave.

THE AMERICAN FLAG (1819)

BY JOSEPH RODMAN DRAKE °
WHEN Freedom from her mountain height,
Unfurled her standard to the air,
She tore the azure robe of night,
And set the stars of glory there.
She mingled with its gorgeous dyes
The milky baldric of the skies,
And striped its pure, celestial white
With streakings of the morning light;
Then from his mansion in the sun

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She called her eagle-bearer down,
And gave into his mighty hand
The symbol of her chosen land.
Majestic monarch of the cloud,
Who rear'st aloft thy regal form,
To hear the tempest-trumpings loud,
And see the lightning lances driven,
When strive the warriors of the storm,
And rolls the thunder drum of heaven,
Child of the sun! to thee 'tis given
To guard the banner of the free,
To hover in the sulphur smoke,
To ward away the battle stroke,
And bid its blendings shine afar,
Like rainbows on the cloud of war,

The harbingers of victory!
Flag of the brave! Thy folds shall fly,
The sign of hope and triumph high!
When speaks the signal trumpet tone,
And the long line comes gleaming on.
Ere yet the life-blood, warm and wet,
Has dimmed the glistening bayonet,
Each soldier eye shall brightly turn
To where thy sky-born glories burn,
And, as his springing steps advance,
Catch war and vengeance from the glance.
And when the cannon-mouthings loud
Heave in wild wreaths the battle shroud,
And gory sabres rise and fall
Like sheets of flame on midnight's pall,
Then shall thy meteor glances glow,
And cowering foes shall sink beneath
Each gallant arm that strikes below
That lovely messenger of death.

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Flag of the seas! On ocean wave
Thy stars shall glitter o'er the brave;
When death, careering on the gale,
Sweeps darkly round the bellied sail,
And frighted waves rush wildly back
Before the broadside's reeling rack,
Each dying wanderer of the sea
Shall look at once to heaven and thee,
And smile to see thy splendors fly
In triumph o'er his closing eye.

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Flag of the free heart's hope and home!

By angel hands to valor given;
Thy stars have lit the welkin dome,

And all thy hues were born in heaven.
And fixed as yonder orb divine,

That saw thy bannered blaze unfurled,
Shall thy proud stars resplendent shine,

The guard and glory of the world.
Forever float that standard sheet!

Where breathes the foe but falls before us,
With Freedom's soil beneath our feet,

And Freedom's banner streaming o'er us?

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AMERICA (1832)
By SAMUEL FRANCIS SMITH
My country, 'tis of thee,
Sweet land of liberty,

Of thee I sing;
Land where my fathers died,
Land of the pilgrims' pride,
From every mountain-side

Let freedom ring.

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By RALPH WALDO EMERSON ° By the rude bridge that arched the flood,

Their flag to April's breeze unfurled, Here once the embattled farmers stood,

And fired the shot heard round the world.

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The foe long since in silence slept;

Alike the conqueror silent sleeps;

And Time the ruined bridge has swept

Down the dark stream which seaward creeps.

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On this green bank, by this soft stream,

We set to-day a votive stone;
That memory may their dead redeem,

When, like our sires, our sons are gone.
Spirit, that made those heroes dare

To die, and leave their children free,
Bid Time and Nature gently spare

The shaft we raise to them and thee.

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THE BATTLE-FIELD .(1837)

BY WILLIAM CULLEN BRYANT°

ONCE this soft turf, this rivulet's sands,

Were trampled by a hurrying crowd,
And fiery hearts and armed hands

Encountered in the battle-cloud.

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Ah! never shall the land forget

How gushed the life-blood of her brave
Gushed, warm with hope and courage yet,

Upon the soil they fought to save.
Now all is calm, and fresh, and still ;

Alone the chirp of flitting bird,
And talk of children on the hill,

And bell of wandering kine are heard.
No solemn host goes trailing by

The black-mouthed gun and staggering wain;
Men start not at the battle-cry,

Oh, be it never heard again!

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